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Yes, Santa, We Just Want your spinal cord injury cure in 2010

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    Yes, Santa, We Just Want your spinal cord injury cure in 2010

    Yes, Santa, We Just Want our spinal cord injury cure in 2010

    AM I ASKING FOR TOO MUCH?

    Dr. Young, you still my Santa year after year because I know you will deliver.


    MERRY CHRISTMAS

    HAPPY HOLIDAYS

    HAPPY NEW YEAR

    TO ALL GUYS AND GIRLS HERE.

    #2
    number 1 on my christmas wish list: a cure!!

    Merry christmas everyone.

    Comment


      #3
      merry christmas manouli, thank you for posting all those interestig articles and thanks for being santa's litlle helper!
      merry x-mas ppl!
      http://www.facebook.com/ivicamaotze.rod

      Comment


        #4
        That's right Santa, thx guys.
        coolbreeze c6/7

        Keep on moving don't stop!

        Comment


          #5
          Could it be in 2009?

          Comment


            #6
            Am i asking for too much?

            Originally posted by manouli View Post
            Yes, Santa, We Just Want our spinal cord injury cure in 2010

            AM I ASKING FOR TOO MUCH?

            Dr. Young, you still my Santa year after year because I know you will deliver.


            MERRY CHRISTMAS

            HAPPY HOLIDAYS

            HAPPY NEW YEAR

            TO ALL GUYS AND GIRLS HERE.
            Not asking too much, just a bit unrealistic,
            for some reason we keep getting coal in our Teds.
            We're in the Land of Misfit Toys, I think.

            Comment


              #7
              Dr. Young, we're counting on you and others; please allow 2010 to be the year of human trials with successes that many of us may be able to share.
              Good luck to all and may 2010 bring renewed hope to all.

              T.J.

              Comment


                #8
                Ho, ho, ho. Go Dasher, Prancer, and Dancer...

                Wise.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Dr. Young, thank you so much for your efforts; you alone offer hope for improvement for so many. I wish you and all luck with the upcoming trials. Many of us belive that something is going to happen in the near future. It is people like you that have made a difference in history and I congratulate you for being the person you are.

                  Above all, may you and your family have a Joyous and Merry Christmas.

                  Thank you and know that many of us are at your command if there is anything we can do.

                  T.J.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Merry Christmas to all.

                    The futures so bright WE gotta wear shades!
                    http://justadollarplease.org/

                    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member

                    "You kids and your cures, why back when I was injured they gave us a wheelchair and that's the way it was and we liked it!" Grumpy Old Man

                    .."i used to be able to goof around so much because i knew Superman had my back. now all i've got is his example -- and that's gonna have to be enough."

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I don't know who Ohwise is but I agree with him or her in some ways (and strongly disagree in other ways). First, I am acutely aware of the slow pace of spinal cord injury research, how much it costs, and the fact that we have not yet contributed a treatment that has been shown to improve function in people with chronic spinal cord injury. Second, Ohwise is trying to stick a blade into something that matters a lot to me. I feel a deep commitment to make every dollar that people donate to my research count. I feel like Warren Buffet who took other people's money and have a strong obligation to provide the best return to the investors. So from these two prospectives, I agree that we have not made sufficient progress. On the other hand, Ohwise is inexcusably ignorant on methylprednisolone, fampridine, and umbilical cord blood cells and lithium for spinal cord injury. The fact that that Ohwise has attacked these therapies suggests that he or she is either Bigbob or Faye, both of whom have irresponsibly attacked these therapies. Let me comment on these three therapies.

                      Methylprednisolone is the first and still the only therapy that has been shown to improve recovery from spinal cord injury. All the critics of the therapy have not provided evidence that it does not work. I would be ecstatic if they spent their time finding a better therapy. This is a drug that I discovered to have beneficial effects on spinal cord injury in 1979. Never in my wildest dreams did I think that we would be discussing methylprednisolone 30 years later as still the first and only drug for acute spinal cord injury. The clinical trials that showed that methylprednisolone is safe and efficaceous in acute spinal cord were carried out between 1984-1997. These trials are still the best double-blind randomized clinical trials that tested therapies for acute spinal cord injury and showed an effective therapy. I have no quarrels with doctors who are not convinced by the data and therefore choose not to use the drug. That is their right. On the other hand, I challenge anybody who says that the drug does not work to provide data and to come out with a better treatment. What bothers me most is that Ohwise and other nihilists like him or her may deprive future victims of the spinal cord injury access to methylprdnisolone. I hope that he or she thinks about this.
                      Fampridine is on the verge of being approved by the FDA as the first drug that improves function in people with multiple sclerosis, a primary demyelinating condition. In the late 1980's, Andrew Blight and others showed that this drug improves conduction in demyelinated axons. At that time, we knew that some people with spinal cord injury have substantial numbers of demyelinated axons and may benefit from the treatment. In 1995, I helped Ron Cohen form a company to develop drugs for spinal cord injury and Acorda Therapeutics raised over $500 million to develop and test therapies for spinal cord injury. Fampridine was one of these drugs that Acorda licensed in 1997. Acorda invested a huge amount into developing Fampridine for spinal cord injury between 1997 and 2007. The clinical trials did not show significant beneficial effects in spinal cord injury. However, Fampridine markedly improved the walking ability of people with multiple sclerosis. While I believe that Fampridine still may benefit some people with spinal cord injury who have demyelination, the company must focus its attention on getting Fampridine on the market so that everybody can have access to the drug.
                      Lithium and umbilical cord blood. We are now doing clinical trials in China and soon in the U.S. to test this combination therapy. Umbilical cord blood cells are currently one of two HLA-matchable cell sources that are immune-compatable and available to treat spinal cord injury. The other one is bone marrow cells. We have found that lithium stimulate umbilical cord blood cell mononuclear cells to proliferate and to produce neurotrophins. Our colleagues at HKU have found that lithium stimulates neural stem cells in the spinal cord to proliferate and to produce neurons. Thus, we are interested to test umbilical cord and lithium alone and in combination on chronic spinal cord injury. I believed that this is a good therapy to start testing in clinical trials in China but I don't think that this is the one and only therapy of chronic spinal cord injury. Ohwise seems to think that this is "my" therapy. It is not. It just happens to the first therapy that we are trying in ChinaSCINet and SCINetUSA.

                      I do apologize for giving in to the Santa Claus spirit and joking about prancer, dancer, and dasher but I thought that people would appreciate the joke.

                      Wise.
                      Last edited by Wise Young; 25 Dec 2009, 6:28 PM.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Dr Young, what do you know what Dr Jack Kessler is doing at Northwestern University. Is there anything promising and what are the status of human trials?

                        Thanks in advance
                        T.J.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                          Lithium and umbilical cord blood. We are now doing clinical trials in China and soon in the U.S. to test this combination therapy. Umbilical cord blood cells are currently one of two HLA-matchable cell sources that are immune-compatable and available to treat spinal cord injury. The other one is bone marrow cells. We have found that lithium stimulate umbilical cord blood cell mononuclear cells to proliferate and to produce neurotrophins. Our colleagues at HKU have found that lithium stimulates neural stem cells in the spinal cord to proliferate and to produce neurons. Thus, we are interested to test umbilical cord and lithium alone and in combination on chronic spinal cord injury. I believed that this is a good therapy to start testing in clinical trials in China but I don't think that this is the one and only therapy of chronic spinal cord injury. Ohwise seems to think that this is "my" therapy. It is not. It just happens to the first therapy that we are trying in ChinaSCINet and SCINetUSA.

                          Wise.
                          i wish the bat was swung a little harder with a myelination therapy and a L1 type therapy added.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by keeping on View Post
                            Dr Young, what do you know what Dr Jack Kessler is doing at Northwestern University. Is there anything promising and what are the status of human trials?

                            Thanks in advance
                            T.J.
                            Keepin On,

                            I have not heard that Jack Kessler is starting any clinical trials at Northwestern. By the way, nobody could possibly question this man's motivation for a cure for spinal cord injury. He is working hard very hard for a cure for his daughter and all people with spinal cord injury. The situation illustrates how hard it is to get therapies into clinical trials in the United States. I have been deeply involved in clinical trials in the past five years, challenging the assumptions that it costs a billion dollars to get a therapy through the gauntlet for FDA approval. At every step along the way, scientists face seemingly insurmountable obstacles to getting their therapies into clinical trials. It takes an enormous amount of evidence, salesmanship, and funds. I hope that they will come up with something soon.

                            Wise.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by DA View Post
                              i wish the bat was swung a little harder with a myelination therapy and a L1 type therapy added.
                              Me, too. But, that will come. I was aiming to get on first base. Wise.

                              Comment

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