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    #91
    Originally posted by zoki83 View Post
    I have tried to donate on Facebook over the past few weeks but have not been able to as I cannot find the donate button anymore. Is this just me not seeing it or has something changed on there? Could someone please help me out with this? Thanks...
    Zoki,

    I'm trying to figure out what is wrong.
    You can also donate here-http://www.justadollarplease.org/

    Comment


      #92
      Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
      After finishing his PhD with me, Kai Liu joined a group at Harvard, headed by Zhigang He. They discovered that a gene called PTEN controls the ability of corticospinal neurons in the cortex to regenerate. If PTEN is knocked out or inactivated by other messengers such as mTOR, corticospinal tracts undergo robust regeneration. PTEN itself acts through other messenger systems such as GSK-3b. He's group has been working on manipualting mTOR. Our group has been working on GSK-3b which is inhibited by lithium (which also stimulates regeneration).
      Dr.Wise,what kind of spinal cord damage will need such therapy as the only chance to restore its nerve conduction? Thanks a lot.

      Comment


        #93
        Dr.Wise,don't consider my question as kind of irony or something,-all this subject is too "nervous" and dramatic and in this case any irony is biting irony.What I ask is what I want will be cleared up.Because you say that"At the present, we do not have any plans to apply this therapy because it involves insertion of a gene with viruses and much work still remains to be done to ensure the safety of this procedure",I wonder whether this technique that to me looks highly promising and even revolutionary is crucial for curing all SCI types or will target some specific spinal damage more than others.If you don't have plans to try it in upcoming human trials which substituted method you'll use for corticospinal neurons substitution? The sooner you'll demonstrate substantial improvement in patients' condition the faster many lives,ruined by this ugly SCI,will get their second birth.Make SCI a history and thus go down in history.

        Comment


          #94
          Dr.Wise,this ominous silence is frightening,say something.

          Comment


            #95
            Dr.Wise,if you do not have any plans to go down in history,I do not insist.But don't create this needless suspense,-you undertook to play rather difficult and imposing high responsibility role,so play it with dignity,don't pose as outraged innocence.Have no wish to give a reply-say that,without performing melodramatic pauses;it also is not such a big pleasure almost every time having by forse to draw out your revelations.Ah!I have nothing against Methylprednizolone,I even like him.

            Comment


              #96
              Kivi...not sure about the others but I feel Dr Young's time is better spent in the lab and collaborating with other scientists than on this site.

              If you have an urgent need I have found it helpful to communicate with Jim, he works with Wise and can usually tell you when Wise is traveling, available, etc..

              Comment


                #97
                Originally posted by SharonD View Post
                I feel Dr Young's time is better spent in the lab and collaborating with other scientists than on this site.
                Completely agree on this.

                Comment


                  #98
                  kivi66, you "even like him", but keep bugging him anyway. "Bugging" -- because you can easily find answers to many of your questions if you keep up with/search the forum. Search for adinovirus, for example to see why gene insertion technology is not ready. Then, you give give him a lecture about how he could go down in history... Such likeness/love would be very annoying to most people.

                  Comment


                    #99
                    Quad62 ,there is an argumentation in my posts for my statements,I weigh what I say.And I do not actually ask him questions...

                    Comment


                      Below is a link to a medical research company's website.
                      They're holding a "best idea" contest in which the top five vote getters are flown to California to present their idea to a board of people who can make it happen.

                      This idea was submitted by Steven Edwards, the administrator of Care Cure, and we all need to vote on it because it concerns us and many others in similar situations.

                      All you have to do is click the link, read the idea, then click "I like this".
                      And it would be cool if you forwarded this e-mail or just send the link to everyone you can.
                      Voting ends September 23 and there are already a few ideas with hundreds of votes, so cast yours now!
                      Thanks.

                      http://bodyshockthefuture.org/ideas.php?st=veterans&reset_pe=1

                      Comment


                        Hi, Just looking for a bit more clarification on the use of umbilical cord blood cells. Finally became a member of the just a dollar please support squad and received 100 bracelets today with their very informative postcards and also today found out that my sister is pregnant again so this leads to the question:
                        Should i consider asking her to store her child's umbilical cord-surely a closer match would have better results or less chance of mutations?. My husband's sister is also pregnant.
                        If this is advisable i would need to get the ball rolling now as not sure how the law lies her in the republic of Ireland but there are banks in Northern Ireland.
                        Also in relation to the us 102c Phase 2 trial, Noirin is a patient of shriner's, will be 7 in Dec but even if she was 8 when the trials are due to start i feel she would not be eligible as Dr. Betz said that she would be one of the last to avail of the treatment when it happpens. I think it was due to the extent of her injury-complete transection and little cord to be seen C6 to T3.Her functional level is T1 AsiaA.
                        If you-jim benn or Dr. Wise can throw any light on this it would be greatly appreciated. thankyou for your continued good work and interest, Sonia.
                        Last edited by noirin's mum; 23 Aug 2010, 3:23 PM. Reason: name wrong

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by noirin's mum View Post
                          Hi, Just looking for a bit more clarification on the use of umbilical cord blood cells. Finally became a member of the just a dollar please support squad and received 100 bracelets today with their very informative postcards and also today found out that my sister is pregnant again so this leads to the question:
                          Should i consider asking her to store her child's umbilical cord-surely a closer match would have better results or less chance of mutations?. My husband's sister is also pregnant.
                          If this is advisable i would need to get the ball rolling now as not sure how the law lies her in the republic of Ireland but there are banks in Northern Ireland.
                          Also in relation to the us 102c Phase 2 trial, Noirin is a patient of shriner's, will be 7 in Dec but even if she was 8 when the trials are due to start i feel she would not be eligible as Dr. Betz said that she would be one of the last to avail of the treatment when it happpens. I think it was due to the extent of her injury-complete transection and little cord to be seen C6 to T3.Her functional level is T1 AsiaA.
                          If you-jim benn or Dr. Wise can throw any light on this it would be greatly appreciated. thankyou for your continued good work and interest, Sonia.
                          Sonia,

                          Umbilical cord that is collected from a relative may or may not match Noirin. As you may know, cells express human leukocyte antigens (HLA) that tell white blood cells who is native or foreign. In particular 3 HLAs determine whether a transplanted cell or tissue is rejected by the immune system: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1. A person possess one set for HLA-A, -B, and -DR from the father and one set from the mother for a total of 6 genes that must be matched. A "perfect" match is when somebody has 6:6 match. In many cases, units that are even 4:6 match will be engrafted for bone marrow replacement.

                          We don't have enough experience to know how well HLA-matching of umbilical cord blood cells must be to survive long term when they are transplanted into the spinal cord. Some people claim that umbilical cord blood cells do not have to be matched when transplanted into the spinal cord. For example, Beike Biotech uses non-HLA matched cells, infusing them intravenously (into blood) or intrathecally (into the CSF) to treat people with spinal cord injury and other neurological conditions.

                          I don't believe that these claims because they present no data of cell survival. Animal studies indicate that neonatal rat blood cells of outbred rats (such as Sprague Dawley or Long-Evans hooded rats) will be rejected within 3-4 weeks when transplanted into the spinal cord. Treatment with immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin or tacrolimus, prevents the loss of cells. If cells were isogenic (inbred) lines are used, the rejection does not occur (in mice or in the Fischer rat strain).

                          The likelihood that Noirin will have a perfect 6:6 HLA match with a relative is highest with a sibling, since a sibling has the genes from the same father and mother. But, even that probability of a perfect match is relatively low. Let us assume that the parents do not share any HLA genes. In such a case, there are four different HLA-A from the mother and father. Likewise, the child receive two of four different HLA-B and HLA-DrB1 genes.

                          Father Mother
                          A1, A2 / A3, A4
                          B1, B2 / B3, B4
                          D1, D2 / D3, D4

                          A sibling of Noirin from such two parents will have a 1:4 chance of matching Noirin exactly for HLA-A, i.e. A1/A3, A1/A4, A2/A3, A2/A4. If one multiplied each of the three HLA antigens (4 x 4 x 4), one obtains an odds ratio of 1:64, the worst case scenario.

                          There are several other considerations:
                          • Similarity of HLA antigen between mother and father. If the parents were to share HLA antigens (e.g. A1, A2 / A1, A3), the number of combinations declines to A1/A2, A1/A1, A1/A3. So the odds ratio would decline to 1:48.
                          • If Noirin is heterozygous for a given HLA-antigen, she will tolerate more types of antigens from a sibling donor. So, for example, if she is A1/A2, she will tolerate both A1/A1 and A1/A2. Toleration could be considered a match. So, the odd ratio of match is lower.
                          • If either parent is homozygous for one of the HLA genes (e.g. A1, A2 / A3, A3), this improves the odds by reducing the number of combinations (e.g. A1/A3 and A2/A3). The chances of a exact match has improve to 1:32. If either parent are homozygous for all three HLA genes, the odds improve to 1:8 for a sibling match.
                          • Matching of HLA-DrB1 appears to be more important than -A or -B. Between 80-90% of umbilical cord blood units will engraft even when 1 or 2 HLA-A or -B mismatches are present.
                          • Not all cells express HLA-antigens. For example, neurons and oligodendroglial precursor cells do not express HLA as strongly as white blood cells and other differentiatied cells.
                          • The immune system in the central nervous system is not as efficient as other tissues. In rats, it often takes 3-4 weeks before the central nervous system detects and rejects allografts from close relatives.


                          So, there is no guarantee that cord blood from Noirin's relatives will match her. For example, the highest likelihood of match is with a sibling, who would share the genes from the same mother and father. Depending on the similarity of HLA antigen from the two parents and whether or not they are homozygous, the odds of a 4:6 match may be as low as 50%. More distant relatives of course would be less likely to match.

                          In general, we expect that 90% of people in the United States will be able to find a match of 4:6 HLA-match from one of the public cord blood banks. Since a vast majority of cord blood collected in the United States are from caucasians, the likelihood of a match is higher for caucasians, probably on the order of 90%. The likelihood of a match for somebody who is Asian and African may be as low as 50% unless there is a race-specific cord blood bank.

                          In ChinaSCiNet, we are using cord blood from Stemcyte. This company has the world's largest collection of Chinese cord blood and we were gratified to find that all the Chinese patients that we screened in the Hong Kong clinical trial matched and 40% actually had perfect 6:6 matches. Stemcyte of course has substantially numbers of caucasian units as well and therefore we think that there almost everybody will be able to find at least a 4:6 HLA-matched unit.

                          In summary, you can ask relatives to collect umbilical cord blood of their babies for Noirin but please understand that, while cord blood from a relative is more likely, a 6:6 match cannot be guaranteed. Depending on the similarity of HLA genes carried by the parents, the likelihood of a match can range from 1:4 to 1:64 with a sibling. Note that HLA typing of the baby can be done in utero (from amniocentesis). But, I don't think that there is a need for such an extreme measure. There is a very high likelihood that Noirin will find matched cells from a public bank and there is no need for such extreme measures.

                          Regarding Noirin's eligibility for the trial at Shriner's, as you know, we had proposed the age range of 8-17 (because ASIA scores are most reliable between those ages). I hope that we get the Shriner's trial going before that time. By the time Noirin is 8, we may know more about the results of the transplants and I don't think that there should be any problem with her getting this treatment. The reason why we chose umbilical cord blood for the trial is that the cells will be available for people if the trial turns out to be positive.

                          Wise.
                          Last edited by Wise Young; 28 Aug 2010, 2:46 PM.

                          Comment


                            Thankyou Dr. Wise for your very detailed response. I just wish that i had listened a little more carefully in biology and physiology! All in all i am still encouraged and scapers bracelets are selling like hotcakes here-its amazing how more approachable people are when it is not embryonic stem cell being discussed.
                            I have looked into cord blood banks here and it is a minefield! Only happening in some private hospitals and stored abroad but there is alot of debate going on and i may as well add my voice.
                            An old irish saying came into my head and i wish it to you...
                            Go N-eirí an bóthar leat- may the road rise up to meet you.
                            I hope that all your hard work comes to fruition. Sonia.

                            Comment


                              I'm a software engineer and I'm open to do some voluntary work for this project. Please PM if you need my time

                              good luck and ty for all you did until now!
                              This signature left intentionally blank.

                              Comment


                                I've been wondering - are the results from the ChinasciNet positive enough to confidently do similar trials in the USA?

                                I guess my nightmare scenario is that the ChinaScINet trials really aren't showing much promise, yet we invest a ton of money to build upon unpromising technology here in the USA.

                                I want to say that I'm a supporter of US trials in any case, actually. Just to get stuff going.
                                Last edited by ip; 25 Sep 2010, 6:43 PM.

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