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Potential Treatment For Spinal Cord Injury Using Multiple Route Bone Marrow Stem Cell

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    Potential Treatment For Spinal Cord Injury Using Multiple Route Bone Marrow Stem Cell

    I don't recall if we post this article before, if we have forgive me.



    Potential Treatment For Spinal Cord Injury Using Multiple Route Bone Marrow Stem Cell Injections
    Main Category: Stem Cell Research
    Also Included In: Neurology / Neuroscience; Clinical Trials / Drug Trials
    Article Date: 13 Mar 2009 - 5:00 PDT

    Researchers from DaVinci Biosciences, Costa Mesa, California, in collaboration with Hospital Luis Vernaza in Ecuador, have determined that injecting a patient's own bone marrow-derived stem cells (autologous BMCs) directly into the spinal column using multiple routes can be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) that returns some quality of life for SCI patients without serious adverse events.
    Publishing in the current issue of Cell Transplantation (Vol. 17 No.12), the researchers reported on eight patients with SCI (four acute and four chronic) to whom they administered BMCs directly into the spinal column, spinal canal and intravenously for each patient and followed for two years using MRI imaging to assess morphological changes in the spinal cord.

    more...

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/142190.php

    #2
    what is the latest info on this?

    Comment


      #3
      hasn't this been done already?

      Comment


        #4
        I have done multiple reviews of bone marrow cell autografts into the spinal cord on this site. Please search for articles containing "bone marrow transplant" by Wise Young.

        There is general agreement that the best way of ensuring that the bone marrow cells get into the spinal cord is direct transplantation of the cells into the spinal cord. All this talk about injecting the cells into the "spinal column" is nonsense... they are probably referring to injecting it intrathecally, i.e. into the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord. Some places also inject it intravascularly, i.e. into the artery. In my opinion, all these methods will not get the cells into the injury site of a chronic injured spinal cord. You waste a lot of cells and a few, if any cell, gets into the spinal cord.

        The few clinical studies where the cells have been injected directly into the spinal cord have not shown significant motor improvement in patients who have chronic spinal cord injury. There have been some reports from a trial in Korea and in Czechoslovakia that direct transplants of bone marrow autografts into the spinal cord may improve sensory recovery when the treatment is given during the first two weeks after injury. These were, however, non-controlled studies. Most of the animal studies have transplanted the cells into the subacute phase and have reported improved recovery.

        I think that bone marrow cells may be beneficial for spinal cord injury and the treatment needs to be studied in a rigorously randomized clinical trial with direct transplantation of the cells into the spinal cord. It was too difficult and expensive to do it in ChinaSCINet, because it requires a GCP/GMP laboratory to prepare the cells at each center. At the time that we considered the therapy for ChinaSCINet, the technology is not yet available for freezing the bone marrow and sending it to a central processing center, isolating the stem cells, freezing them again, and sending the cells back to the hospital. So, all the cell processing would have to be done locally. We could not afford to do that.

        A lot of people have gone to X-cells in Cologne, Germany. They provide a service where they will harvest bone marrow cells that can then be injected. I think that most people have had their cells administered intravenously or intrathecally. I have not heard of any verified case of substantial recovery associated with such therapies. This is consistent with what I know about the low probability that bone marrow cells will enter the spinal cord.

        Normally, no peripheral blood or bone marrow cells enter the brain or spinal cord throughout the life of an animal. There is of course hemorrhage and invasion of inflammatory cells and stem cells into the acutely injured spinal cords but the likelihood that some intravascularly injected cells will enter the a chronic injury site of the spinal cord is low. This is also true of intrathecally injected cells.

        Wise.

        Comment


          #5
          Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplants into SCI

          Dr. Wise Young,
          I do not know if you have read the article published in Cell Transplantation (2008) entitled, "Administration of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells
          Into Spinal Cord Injury Patients Via Multiple Routes Is Safe
          and Improves Their Quality of Life: Comprehensive Case Studies". The cells are administered via several routes and one of them is directly into the spinal cord, in and around the injury epicenter. The study published above is the first demonstrating this method. In addition, there is evidence in the literature that these cells migrate into SCI sites. They contain the correct ligand/receptor combo for migration.

          If you would like a copy of this article, I can send you one.
          Rafael

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by antiquity View Post
            hasn't this been done already?
            yes, about 50,000 times.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by DA View Post
              yes, about 50,000 times.
              and it does not help chronic injuries...turns out nothing does!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by RafaelGonzalez View Post
                Dr. Wise Young,
                I do not know if you have read the article published in Cell Transplantation (2008) entitled, "Administration of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells
                Into Spinal Cord Injury Patients Via Multiple Routes Is Safe
                and Improves Their Quality of Life: Comprehensive Case Studies". The cells are administered via several routes and one of them is directly into the spinal cord, in and around the injury epicenter. The study published above is the first demonstrating this method. In addition, there is evidence in the literature that these cells migrate into SCI sites. They contain the correct ligand/receptor combo for migration.

                If you would like a copy of this article, I can send you one.
                Rafael
                Rafael, where is it published? I would like to see this. Wise.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Wise, what is the outlook for chronics? Is any of the topics being discussed have any potential for chronics? I ask this because many of these treatments say for acute cases, this treatment may improve the outlook for thoses patients; what is the outlook for chronics? I know your upcoming trials are for chrnoics. Please clear this up for us chronics.
                  Thanks on advance,
                  T.J.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by keeping on View Post
                    Wise, what is the outlook for chronics? Is any of the topics being discussed have any potential for chronics? I ask this because many of these treatments say for acute cases, this treatment may improve the outlook for thoses patients; what is the outlook for chronics? I know your upcoming trials are for chrnoics. Please clear this up for us chronics.
                    Thanks on advance,
                    T.J.
                    Keeping on,

                    Several groups have now published studies suggesting that bone marrow autografts are beneficial for spinal cord injury. I have revealed many of these studies in Czechoslovakia, Korea, China, and Ecuador (the study mentioned in this thread). I must say that I am skeptical of reports that intravenously infused bone marrow cells are beneficial for the following reasons:
                    1. The bone marrow is constantly releasing cells into the blood stream. I don't understand how taking cells from the bone marrow and infusing the cells into the blood stream is any different from giving the patient GCSF (a hormone that stimulates production of stem cells from bone marrow).
                    2. In the animal studies that I have seen, infused cells do not get into the spinal cord. I am not sure why others keep reporting that this happens. I have not seen it in our experiments and I know many laboratories that don't see the cells get into the spinal cord after intravenous infusion.
                    3. It is not clear what bone marrow cells do in the spinal cord after they get in. I know that lots of people think that they produce neurons or other neural cells, such as oligodendroglia. We have never seen labelled bone marrow cells produce any other cell besides mononuclear cells.


                    However, the human studies to date suggest that autologous transplants of bone marrow stem cells to the spinal cord are safe. I have not heard of anybody losing function or developing a tumor in the spinal cord. Several groups have reported beneficial effects but I would like to see a controlled study, i.e. one that is surgically controlled. This may be hard to achieve.

                    Wise.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                      Rafael, where is it published? I would like to see this. Wise.
                      Rafael, sorry. I just realized that you are referring to the paper published in Cell Transplantation. I have seen that.

                      wise.

                      Comment

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