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  • The Miracle Worker

    http://www.spinalcure.org.au/a/123.html

    Take a look at this link. Interesting reading if you want to understand what sort of people the top researchers are.

    I must admit I have had a catharsis. I have let go of the idea of my ever being cured although I am in no way dismissing the cure as a possibility and am still very interested in the research, more objectively interested. It took 24 years to reach this view point and the cure sure was a useful way of getting through life while I really thought it could still happen to me. Then it started to seem as if too much time had passed and the research was moving too slowly. Doubt and depression took over. Now I have shed the idea I am strangely happy and optimistic about the future.

    Don't get me wrong - I am not a satisfied cripple, proudly disabled. I just completely ignore the fact that I'm any different from other people and am extremely irritated when people point out the fact that I am different.........lol! (You know, they come up and talk to you like a 2 year old and say in a mincing voice "do you need any help?") I'm sure they mean well but it is just a reminder that you stick out like a sore thumb just when you'd forgotten you were any different. lol again. And why is it always frail looking people who ask if you need help and the big weightlifter types seem to look the other way? I sometimes feel like saying "ok, just lift me out of the car." I'm rambling - how did I change the subject like that?...............

  • #2
    I think you rock!!! :-)
    1FineSpineRN

    Comment


    • #3
      That was a excellent read. Thank you for posting it. Could any one tell me when this interview was conducted/ How old is this artical? Is there anywhere that I could keep up with what Prof.Raisman is currently doing? Thanks again!

      Comment


      • #4
        What an extraordinary article. it makes me optimistic about the future! thank you for posting.
        "It's not the despair, I can handle the despair! It's the hope!" - John Cleese

        Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials. (Ox)
        Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kickingber
          That was a excellent read. Thank you for posting it. Could any one tell me when this interview was conducted/ How old is this artical? Is there anywhere that I could keep up with what Prof.Raisman is currently doing? Thanks again!
          Beginning of the article says "The Sunday Times Magazine 9/4/2006".I did a quick google search on his name but couldn't find anything recent.
          I'd also be interested to learn more.

          Comment


          • #6
            I must have missed the date, sorry for that. thanks for the info.

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's a link to an earlier posting & discussion on Raisman and this article...
              /forum/showthread.php?t=61447

              And here's a link to Raisman's department at University College of London
              http://www.ion.ucl.ac.uk/research/hb...epair_unit.htm

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Christopher Paddon
                http://www.spinalcure.org.au/a/123.html

                Take a look at this link. Interesting reading if you want to understand what sort of people the top researchers are.

                I must admit I have had a catharsis. I have let go of the idea of my ever being cured although I am in no way dismissing the cure as a possibility and am still very interested in the research, more objectively interested. It took 24 years to reach this view point and the cure sure was a useful way of getting through life while I really thought it could still happen to me. Then it started to seem as if too much time had passed and the research was moving too slowly. Doubt and depression took over. Now I have shed the idea I am strangely happy and optimistic about the future.

                Don't get me wrong - I am not a satisfied cripple, proudly disabled. I just completely ignore the fact that I'm any different from other people and am extremely irritated when people point out the fact that I am different.........lol! (You know, they come up and talk to you like a 2 year old and say in a mincing voice "do you need any help?") I'm sure they mean well but it is just a reminder that you stick out like a sore thumb just when you'd forgotten you were any different. lol again. And why is it always frail looking people who ask if you need help and the big weightlifter types seem to look the other way? I sometimes feel like saying "ok, just lift me out of the car." I'm rambling - how did I change the subject like that?...............
                Hello, Christopher. I am so glad to see you posting again. Wise.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Wise Young
                  Hello, Christopher. I am so glad to see you posting again. Wise.
                  Thanks Wise!

                  You know one thing that blows my mind is the following bit of information from the article "There are more combinations of signals in the massed neuronal undergrowth than there are particles in the known universe."

                  Something that should be considered whenever there are claims that humans can make an artifical human brain - yeah, right!

                  http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc.../chem00963.htm

                  This states that there are 7.2 x 10 to the power of 19 atoms in a grain of sand. 72,000,000,000,000,000,000 I think is the rather large number.

                  Of course each atom is made up of many particles, more than originally thought, certainly more than just the number of neutrons, electrons and protons as these are made up of many particles.

                  So, how many grains of sand on an average beach? How many beaches in the world? How many particles in all the other objects on earth besides the beaches?

                  We must be getting to quite a big number by now.

                  How many planets round the sun, and moons and other debris?

                  How many stars in our galaxy? How many particles hidden in dark matter and black holes, in which matter is considerably compressed?

                  Beginning to freak out yet?

                  http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/as...s/021127a.html

                  Apparantly there maybe 125 billion galaxies in the universe.

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe

                  Anyway, "There are more combinations of signals in the massed neuronal undergrowth than there are particles in the known universe."

                  Wise Young please sort out my broken connections for me - it can't be too difficult.....................................

                  Of course I am being whimsical. I know the goal is to find a way for the central nervous system to reorganize itself.

                  Still, it makes you think, whatever that means.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Beginning to freak out yet?
                    yup - a whole lotta zero's starting to pile up in my brain, in more than one way :-)
                    "It's not the despair, I can handle the despair! It's the hope!" - John Cleese

                    Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials. (Ox)
                    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Christopher Paddon
                      Thanks Wise!

                      You know one thing that blows my mind is the following bit of information from the article "There are more combinations of signals in the massed neuronal undergrowth than there are particles in the known universe."

                      Something that should be considered whenever there are claims that humans can make an artifical human brain - yeah, right!

                      http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc.../chem00963.htm

                      This states that there are 7.2 x 10 to the power of 19 atoms in a grain of sand. 72,000,000,000,000,000,000 I think is the rather large number.

                      Of course each atom is made up of many particles, more than originally thought, certainly more than just the number of neutrons, electrons and protons as these are made up of many particles.

                      So, how many grains of sand on an average beach? How many beaches in the world? How many particles in all the other objects on earth besides the beaches?

                      We must be getting to quite a big number by now.

                      How many planets round the sun, and moons and other debris?

                      How many stars in our galaxy? How many particles hidden in dark matter and black holes, in which matter is considerably compressed?

                      Beginning to freak out yet?

                      http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/as...s/021127a.html

                      Apparantly there maybe 125 billion galaxies in the universe.

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe

                      Anyway, "There are more combinations of signals in the massed neuronal undergrowth than there are particles in the known universe."

                      Wise Young please sort out my broken connections for me - it can't be too difficult.....................................

                      Of course I am being whimsical. I know the goal is to find a way for the central nervous system to reorganize itself.

                      Still, it makes you think, whatever that means.
                      Christopher,

                      Let me give you my favorite example of the common housefly, which has probably no more than a thousand neurons but can perform tasks such as fly and land upside down, walk with six legs, and complex aerobatics that we cannot even dream of. We don't really need that many neurons in order to perform the basic functions.

                      Wise.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wise Young
                        Christopher,

                        Let me give you my favorite example of the common housefly, which has probably no more than a thousand neurons but can perform tasks such as fly and land upside down, walk with six legs, and complex aerobatics that we cannot even dream of. We don't really need that many neurons in order to perform the basic functions.

                        Wise.
                        Yeah, with all that spare neuronal capacity we humans have, most of us (not you Wise) should feel guilty about not reading and learning more..........still I guess it's our brain to do with (or not) what we like

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