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  • syringomyelia

    I am c4-c5 complete and i have syrongomyelia. In the future if i want to have a treatment(stem cells) it is influece the treatment? What i have to make?

  • #2
    Stem and syringo

    Have the cyst removed first then the stem cells injected. That is what Dr. Hwang and Kao do.

    Good luck;

    JJG
    Jake's Pop

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    • #3
      I once had a syrinx in the area of my injury and a neurosurgeon put in what was called a K-shunt. I never received any negative side effects from that. In fact my sensations seemed to improve afterwards. It is unknown how long I actually had the syrinx, when it developed, before it was discovered three years after injury.
      I'm not short im funsized!

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      • #4
        I had one too, and I used to get an unbelievably massive headache when I laid flat. I had to go to Miami where they did surgery on me. They placed a shunt on my spine that drains the fluid somewhere. (i think my stomach but don't quite recall ), nevertheless I don't have anymore symptoms
        "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

        "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


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        • #5
          Originally posted by petros5a
          I am c4-c5 complete and i have syrongomyelia. In the future if i want to have a treatment(stem cells) it is influece the treatment? What i have to make?
          A syringomyelic cyst is an enlargement of the central canal. In the past, surgeons use to believe that the cyst results from increased pressure within the central canal and therefore treated it by place a shunt into the cyst. The shunt is a tube connecting the cyst to the intrathecal space or to the pleural cavity (outside the lungs). While the shunt often reduced the size of the cyst, the shunt often would clog up about a year or two and the cyst will return.

          The cyst may not cause any symptoms or it may be associated with neuropathic pain and ascending loss of function. Most surgeons leave the cyst alone when there are not symptoms and the cyst does not seem to be enlarging over time. However, if there is pain or neurological loss associated with the syringomyelic cysts, surgeons may then recommend surgery.

          Modern surgical treatment of syringmyelic cysts is different from just shunting the cyst. The current theory is that the cyst does not arise from increase pressure but increased flow of cerebrospinal fluid through the central canal. What is the difference? The difference is the same as the difference between a lake and a river. The syringomyelic cyst is not a lake. It is like a river.

          Everyday, nearly a liter of cerebrospinal fluid goes from the brain down the spinal cord (mostly in the space between the spinal cord and arachnoid membrane). The fluid is absorbed by the arachnoid. When there has been injury and adhesions develop between the arachnoid and the spinal cord, cerebrospinal fluid can no longer flow as readily around the cord. Thus, some of the flow is diverted to the central canal, which gradually enlarges because of the increased flow.

          Most neurosurgeons today should be trying to remove the adhesions around the injury site and restore pulsatile flow around the spinal cord during the surgery. In a landmark series of studies, Barth Green and his colleaues at Miami showed removal of the adhesions and untethering of the spinal cord, restoring cerebrospinal fluid flow, will result in reduction of the syringomyelic cyst without need for a shunt. I would recommend that approach.

          I don't know about Carl Kao but i don't think that Hongyun Huang has been transplanting cells into the syringomyelic cyst. It doesn't make sense to do that, if the above is true. Why would you want to put cells into the cyst and maintain its size? The cells should be injected into the spinal cord itself. That is what Hongyun Huang does. He injects the OEG cells into the spinal cord above and below the injury site.

          Wise.

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          • #6
            syrinx

            you can not remove a syrinx ,sorry just put a shunt in it if needed .
            SM/ACM Surgery in 1999

            When the world says "give up"; hope whispers "try one more time"
            -anonymous

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Wise Young
              Most neurosurgeons today should be trying to remove the adhesions around the injury site and restore pulsatile flow around the spinal cord during the surgery. In a landmark series of studies, Barth Green and his colleaues at Miami showed removal of the adhesions and untethering of the spinal cord, restoring cerebrospinal fluid flow, will result in reduction of the syringomyelic cyst without need for a shunt. I would recommend that approach.
              Hello again Dr. Young :-)
              I guess adhesion is coming from some kind of scar tissue tethered around the cord to the arachnoid membrane. Am I correct?.. If so, do we know if DECORIN could be usefull to remove such adhesions around the injury site?.. May be we will have a chance to get faster a DECORIN clinical trial approved by FDA for syringo?.. This will be taking care of syrinx *without surgery*, untethering the cord, and may be reduce both spasticity and chronical pain?.. And may be more?..
              May be I'm dreaming but if DECORIN, naturally produced by the cord, could give a chance to avoid the surgery to remove the cyst by removing adhesion and untethering the cord, this could be great..
              What do you think?..
              Thanks
              George 78

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              • #8
                cyst and Dr. Hwang

                Dr. Young:

                Yes Dr. Hwuang removed the cyst first and then injected the cells above and below the injury;


                Regardsl

                Joe
                Jake's Pop

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by George78
                  Hello again Dr. Young :-)
                  I guess adhesion is coming from some kind of scar tissue tethered around the cord to the arachnoid membrane. Am I correct?.. If so, do we know if DECORIN could be usefull to remove such adhesions around the injury site?.. May be we will have a chance to get faster a DECORIN clinical trial approved by FDA for syringo?.. This will be taking care of syrinx *without surgery*, untethering the cord, and may be reduce both spasticity and chronical pain?.. And may be more?..
                  May be I'm dreaming but if DECORIN, naturally produced by the cord, could give a chance to avoid the surgery to remove the cyst by removing adhesion and untethering the cord, this could be great..
                  What do you think?..
                  Thanks
                  George 78
                  George,

                  Surgery today is curing 80% of syringomyelic cysts... Decorin has not been shown to prevent arachnoid adhesions yet. The 20% of cases where the syrinx recurs probably comes re-adhesion of the arachnoid. There is a treatment that has been available for over 10 years for preventing this readhesion. In fact, the treatment (called Adcon gel) was so good that it prevented dural healing in several cases, resulting in dural leaks. The FDA put a hold of the drug and the company went bankrupt (http://investing.businessweek.com/re...ivcapId=29017].

                  Wise.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by giambjj
                    Dr. Young:

                    Yes Dr. Hwuang removed the cyst first and then injected the cells above and below the injury;


                    Regardsl

                    Joe
                    Joe,

                    Hi. I have seen the surgery. He does not remove the cyst. In fact, he exposes the surrounding cord without exposing the injury site. He simply injects the cells into the surrounding cord.

                    wise.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by razzle51
                      you can not remove a syrinx ,sorry just put a shunt in it if needed .
                      That is correct. You cannot remove the cyst. You can shunt it. Alternatively, if you restore cerebrospinal fluid flow around the spinal cord (where it normally flows), the syrinx will go away without a shunt.

                      Wise.

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