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Running Icy Cold Saline Shown To Prevent Paralysis Among Spinal Cord Injuries

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    Running Icy Cold Saline Shown To Prevent Paralysis Among Spinal Cord Injuries

    Running Icy Cold Saline Shown To Prevent Paralysis Among Spinal Cord Injuries
    Lowering Body's Temperature Protects Against Damage


    According to the Spinal Cord Injury Information Network, there are about 11,000 new cases of spinal cord injuries each year in the United States. As of June 2006, there were about 253,000 people living with a spinal cord injury.

    When a spinal cord injury occurs, there is the primary insult -- the impact -- which neither doctors nor patients can do anything about. But there are also secondary injuries -- the damage that happens in the minutes, hours, days and weeks after the primary injury.

    continue....

    http://www.thedenverchannel.com/heal...den&psp=health

    #2
    Sad but this is another potential treatment for acute injuries that will never be in wide use. Drug companies make nothing out of it therefore it will never be accepted or practised by the majority of the medical profession.

    Comment


      #3
      cool & simple
      This signature left intentionally blank.

      Comment


        #4
        This is a disturbing find. After all this time, all it takes is a cold squirt of saline to deter a SCI in the initial stages. WTF. In the report of the football player it read he had suffered a "severe spinal injury" in the Cervical region. Severe sounds like the worst it can get, and this guy is walking like normal from a shot of saline? Gee, better take it to trials to see if its safe. F'n retarded.
        I am not your rolling wheels
        I am the highway
        I am not your carpet ride
        I am the sky
        I am not your blowing wind
        I am the lightning
        I am not your autumn moon
        I am the night, the night..

        Comment


          #5
          they were saying the saline did nothing to help kevin everrett. the more i read the less I believe they know about what really works and what doesn't. this whole situation appears to be a mess, I dont see how anything will ever get done..

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Eric.S
            they were saying the saline did nothing to help kevin everrett. the more i read the less I believe they know about what really works and what doesn't. this whole situation appears to be a mess, I dont see how anything will ever get done..
            this is to true .
            "ELE" ~ Jackie Moon

            Comment


              #7
              Well what was it cause he has lots of $$ to finagle his way out of it with a current treatment that none of us has access to just celebrities if they get presented with this situation?
              I am not your rolling wheels
              I am the highway
              I am not your carpet ride
              I am the sky
              I am not your blowing wind
              I am the lightning
              I am not your autumn moon
              I am the night, the night..

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Eric.S
                they were saying the saline did nothing to help kevin everrett. the more i read the less I believe they know about what really works and what doesn't. this whole situation appears to be a mess, I dont see how anything will ever get done..
                This post is the most truth I have seen come out of this whole debacle.
                No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

                Comment


                  #9
                  This same thing has been used as a "treatment" for brain injury, supposedly to prevent secondary damage (same theory going on w/ SCI treatments). In trials, it was supposedly proven to have little to no effect on the outcome of the patient, but some doctors refuse to accept that. That's why we're seeing high profile survivors getting these treatments (look up the story of Emilio Navaira). I assume these docs just want more funding...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Jason C
                    This same thing has been used as a "treatment" for brain injury, supposedly to prevent secondary damage (same theory going on w/ SCI treatments). In trials, it was supposedly proven to have little to no effect on the outcome of the patient, but some doctors refuse to accept that. That's why we're seeing high profile survivors getting these treatments (look up the story of Emilio Navaira). I assume these docs just want more funding...

                    thats the whole point of my original statement. we dont really know the motivation of any of the people we depend on to find the cure. they may not truly have any hostile or self-ish reasons for there work but you gotta believe its hard to accept years of work being dismissed. you combine ego, career, and money and there's bound to be discent among peers.

                    A while ago I read an essay about a study done that showed clinical trial results can in certain ways be skewed and that the process is alot more subjective and less scientific than we think.

                    I'd bet money that there has been an effective treatment somewhere at sometime for some ailment that has failed the clinical trial. think about sci and the amount of rehab it would take to show improvement after many years in a wheelchair not to mention the differences between patients and work ethics, I could definitely see that causing a therapy to fail a trial.

                    theres been things that doctors have been using for years and then they turn around and tell you it has no effect. I've had doctors tell me about things like that.

                    in quantum physics they have shown that consciousness can effect outcome which may add to the questionable results we get. ever been in a situation where your sure of something and then someone of a different or opposite perspective comes in and dismisses all your certainties. this seems to happen in sci research... maybe its about funding or maybe its perspective or even attitude...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Eric.S
                      they were saying the saline did nothing to help kevin everrett. the more i read the less I believe they know about what really works and what doesn't. this whole situation appears to be a mess, I dont see how anything will ever get done..
                      Eric, I disagree. Hypothermia has been long studied. The reason why Kevin Everett recovered is clear. Let me deal with each in turn.

                      • Cooling reduces energy use by cells and preserves ATP in the cells. Reduction of temperature to even 32˚C allows the brain and spinal cord to withstand loss of blood flow for 10-20 minutes rather than the usual 6 minutes. Demonstrating the beneficial effects of hypothermia on people, however, has proven to be difficult for several reasons. First, when you cool the body, you activate temperature-maintaining mechanisms, such as shivering and increased metabolism, intended to warm up the body. These mechanisms are harmful. So, most scientists try to create a hypothermia state called poikilothermia. By giving certain drugs that block the body's ability to warm itself up, it is possible to cool the body without activating the shivering mechanisms. Second, while moderate hypothermia (32˚C) is useful, it is not miraculous. To achieve truly truly protective effects, it is necessary to cool the body to 15˚C. This kind of hypothermia prevents its own problems. If the body is kept at 15˚C for more than a couple of hours, the cells lose their ionic gradients and become inexcitable. The heart slows down and stops. It is often hard to restart the heart. Third, local cooling can do a lot of the work but one needs to expose the brain or the spinal cord in order to cool the tissue directly. You can't maintain the cooling for long. While this is often done in surgery, the beneficial effects of short-term local cooling just have not yet been demonstrated. Finally, hypothermia is commonly used by surgeons, particularly in kids. Many kids become naturally hypothermic when they are anesthetized. So, doctors would let their temperatures drop to 32˚C . There is a need for more and better clinical trials to test hypothermia treatments of spinal cord injury. Many factors must be determined, including the optimal temperature, duration, and timing.

                      • I was interviewed by a journalist concerning Kevin Everett (NY Times) and the journalist told me (and later published) that Everett had movement in his legs before his surgery. Whille there has not been any reports concerning his anal sensation and sphincter function, I assume that he was an ASIA C before his surgery. That fact alone would account for Everett walking. Dobkins, et al. and other studies have shown that 90% of people with ASIA C recover walking. Unfortunately, the senior attending physician announced shortly after the surgery that the prognosis for recovering is dismal. Thus, when Kevin Everett did recover walking, everybody then attributed it to the hypothermia and conveniently forgot that he was ASIA C and probably would have walked anyway.

                      Wise.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Wise Young
                        Eric, I disagree. Hypothermia has been long studied. The reason why Kevin Everett recovered is clear. Let me deal with each in turn.

                        • Cooling reduces energy use by cells and preserves ATP in the cells. Reduction of temperature to even 32˚C allows the brain and spinal cord to withstand loss of blood flow for 10-20 minutes rather than the usual 6 minutes. Demonstrating the beneficial effects of hypothermia on people, however, has proven to be difficult for several reasons. First, when you cool the body, you activate temperature-maintaining mechanisms, such as shivering and increased metabolism, intended to warm up the body. These mechanisms are harmful. So, most scientists try to create a hypothermia state called poikilothermia. By giving certain drugs that block the body's ability to warm itself up, it is possible to cool the body without activating the shivering mechanisms. Second, while moderate hypothermia (32˚C) is useful, it is not miraculous. To achieve truly truly protective effects, it is necessary to cool the body to 15˚C. This kind of hypothermia prevents its own problems. If the body is kept at 15˚C for more than a couple of hours, the cells lose their ionic gradients and become inexcitable. The heart slows down and stops. It is often hard to restart the heart. Third, local cooling can do a lot of the work but one needs to expose the brain or the spinal cord in order to cool the tissue directly. You can't maintain the cooling for long. While this is often done in surgery, the beneficial effects of short-term local cooling just have not yet been demonstrated. Finally, hypothermia is commonly used by surgeons, particularly in kids. Many kids become naturally hypothermic when they are anesthetized. So, doctors would let their temperatures drop to 32˚C . There is a need for more and better clinical trials to test hypothermia treatments of spinal cord injury. Many factors must be determined, including the optimal temperature, duration, and timing.

                        • I was interviewed by a journalist concerning Kevin Everett (NY Times) and the journalist told me (and later published) that Everett had movement in his legs before his surgery. Whille there has not been any reports concerning his anal sensation and sphincter function, I assume that he was an ASIA C before his surgery. That fact alone would account for Everett walking. Dobkins, et al. and other studies have shown that 90% of people with ASIA C recover walking. Unfortunately, the senior attending physician announced shortly after the surgery that the prognosis for recovering is dismal. Thus, when Kevin Everett did recover walking, everybody then attributed it to the hypothermia and conveniently forgot that he was ASIA C and probably would have walked anyway.

                        Wise.
                        your clearlying more informed on the subject than i am so who am i to argue but I still feel frustrated by the opposing views and comments you hear coming from researchers...

                        another question is why ddidn't the senior physician understand what you just explained about everrett's situation?

                        Comment

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