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  • #16
    LaoziSailor-

    I take no offense...I do admit...that because I am not in the hardware part of the computer industry...I do not know as much about the hardware end as I do the software end. However...I do agree that Matt...you should do what will ultimately make you happy...and not deciding upon a career by how much money you make. Remember...you will be working for a while...you want to be able to wake up every morning and be able to say for the most part that you love going to work. I can honestly say that I do. That is what really matters.

    wheelie
    "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mr_coffee
      SOrry i should have read the post more. But what i'm saying is, CS arn't given the business behind it all, they teach them how to think logically, take alot of abstract math, and do alot of programming, no business at all unless you do a minor in business or a double major. Software Engineering will give you some business background but its hard to find a school that offers SE, on the east cost there are only 2 accredited colleges i know of, which is Mellon and RIT.
      Knowledge of the business comes from years of experience in the field. An entry level programmer shadows a senior programmer until they have a better understanding of aligning the business goals with IT. It’s standard practice.



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      • #18
        Either way you go, if you can get a job right out of college I think you'll be set. You need to get your foot in the door because if your graduating, there are going to be tons of people wanting your same job. I have a alot of nerdy friends, who are now seniors in CS/SE/CE, and they all say its been such a bitch to get an internship lately unless you have very good grades but then again i'm coming from a different school. Just don't stay static once you graduate.

        Question to the Software people out there. Do you find yourself constantly under pressure to learn the newest language out there to stay ahead of the game and marketable? Like on your free time do you sit down and learn up on the newest trends or what? I always thought that would be very stressful if you would always have to take your job home with you, thats another part that turned me offf from software. Don't get me wrong, I love to program especially with OO languages like C++/Java/C#, infact its my stronger point, i'm better at programming then I am at hardware at the moment but i'm only a sophmore and i've been doing programming alot longer then i have been working with hardware/circuit analysis/design. Also any hardware people out there that can give some insight on what their daily life is like:?
        Last edited by mr_coffee; 01-25-2006, 03:22 AM.
        Injured:10-16-04
        C7/C8, T1 incomplete;


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        • #19
          Mr. Coffee-

          From my experience...I would have to say that I am not really pressured to learn the newest and greatest language that is out there. There are many companies who invested a ton of money into their programs that use the older programs and who are not so willing to upgrade to the newest language just because it is out there. Many people are flocking to the newer languages, but there are many companies who are looking for those people who have a solid handle on those older languages that can support the technology they do have until they are ready to invest in something else. Then...usually...if you prove your worth to the company, you learn the language at the same time.

          For me personally though, I try to keep up to date on the newest and greatest things that are out there. Not because I have to or because I am pressured into doing so...but because it is fun for me to do so. When I have some free time (some months it is more than others), I will sit down and try to teach myself something new. It keeps me interested in the latest technology and it keeps me challenged.
          "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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          • #20
            I see, thanks for the info wheeliecoach, what type of software devlopment/what languages do you usually work with?
            Injured:10-16-04
            C7/C8, T1 incomplete;


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            • #21
              Let's see...I work with the following:

              C++
              VB
              JavaScript
              Java
              HTML
              LotusScript (like C++ but made to develop in Lotus notes)
              SAS
              COBOL

              Hmmm...I think that is it. Let me know if you have any questions concerning any of these and how/where I use them. It is good to get perspectives on all aspects. Then you can make an informed decision about what you want to do the rest of your life.
              "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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              • #22
                My work involves both hardware and software - my focus is on the entire systems for implantable pacemakers and defibrillators. I work with excellent hardware and with excellent software engineers. A few of them are knowledgeable about "the other side," although they don't do design outside their specialty. Those people are the most valuable for our kind of work, as they are able to make the most efficient use of what they have to work with. I expect that in the coming years there will be even more emphasis on small systems (autos, dishwashers, pacemakers, wheelchairs, streetlights, you name it), where the person with a broad knowledge of both HW and SW will have a lot of opportunities. So don’t completely freeze out either side, but get a broad education.
                - Richard

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by mr_coffee
                  Question to the Software people out there. Do you find yourself constantly under pressure to learn the newest language out there to stay ahead of the game and marketable? Like on your free time do you sit down and learn up on the newest trends or what?
                  No pressure at all. Companies don't invest in implementing a new language or technology just because it's the "newest greatest thing". Business needs are the driving force behind technology not the other way around. Most companies have absolutely NO problem sending programmers to training just as long as it can be justified. The only exception is contractors... there on their own.



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