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    Windows Help!

    Please help save the life of a new HP desktop. I need some help trying to figure out how to type on a PDF file. I cant write so I wanted to type on the computer. Scanned the form and sent it as a PDF to the computer. Wont let me type on it. Why? How do I fix it?

    #2
    Others are better at this than me, but I think .pdf files are locked. Try sending as .txt or another.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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      #3
      Do you have Word?
      If so right-click on the file and open with Word.

      If not then install internet explorer 11 and Adobe Acrobat reader then right-click and open with internet explorer
      T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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        #4
        I have word and tried that. It wouldnt allow me to type on it still. And the format was all jacked up too. I couldnt tell what line with what question. I will try and download Acrobat. Thanks mize!

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          #5
          I will try as a txt nonoise. Thanks!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by #LHB# View Post
            I have word and tried that. It wouldnt allow me to type on it still. And the format was all jacked up too. I couldnt tell what line with what question. I will try and download Acrobat. Thanks mize!
            Unfortunately there are no perfect options that are free. We use sobering called Nitro Pro at work but it's $$$
            T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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              #7
              Dag! Thanks. Mize I need a program to help me create a label for a food product that I am doing. Something like Adobe illustraitor except free. Any suggestions?

              Comment


                #8
                Inkscape is free and full featured.
                T3 complete since Sept 2015.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by #LHB# View Post
                  Please help save the life of a new HP desktop. I need some help trying to figure out how to type on a PDF file. I cant write so I wanted to type on the computer. Scanned the form and sent it as a PDF to the computer. Wont let me type on it. Why? How do I fix it?
                  You don't say how you "scanned" the form.

                  In general, a "scan" is essentially a "photograph". The "text" that you see is, as far as the scan is concerned, just a picture that happens to resemble letters and words.

                  If you had scanned a photo of your house, where do you think you should be able to type??

                  PDF's that are designed to be "filled in" actually define regions in the "image" where text will be accepted. You click on a "field" and can type into that area -- before moving on to another "field". (You can also define things like check boxes that can be "checked" by the user).

                  With this in mind, think of your document as a photograph that you want to scribble on.

                  So, save it in a photo format (PNG, GIF, BMP, TIF, JPG, etc.). Then, use a photo editor ("Paint" is part of all Windows releases) to open the file. Click on the "Text" tool (looks like an uppercase 'A' on the toolbar at the top ~center). Drag a box on the image to indicate where you want to type. Select an appropriate font, font size, style, color, etc. Then, type what you want into the box.

                  What you will quickly discover is that you can't EDIT -- or MOVE after you've left "text mode"! -- what you have typed! You are, in effect, just scribbling directly onto the image (programs like Illustrator and Photoshop treat the text as if it was a separate "object" that could be manipulated independent of the underlying image). If you want to make changes, you have to "scribble OVER" what you already wrote!

                  So, with this in mind, type what you want on a blank portion of the screen (something that is a solid color identical to the background in the area that you want to type; typically, this would be white). Get the text, size, font, etc. right. Then, "select" that area (use the "Select" tool to draw a box that JUST contains the text of interest. Then, drag the box to the place on the image where you want the text to be.

                  The area where the text had been originally will be replaced with an empty "white" (or, whatever "color 2" happens to be -- look at the toolbar) box.

                  Lather, rinse, repeat. Attached a screen capture (equivalent of a "scan" -- it's just a "picture"!) of what I've typed and steps to manipulate it using Paint.

                  (sorry the images kinda ran together like that...)

                  This is far from an ideal solution. But, works without having to install any other software.
                  Last edited by automation; 15 Jun 2018, 5:22 PM. Reason: added caveats

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by automation View Post
                    You don't say how you "scanned" the form.

                    In general, a "scan" is essentially a "photograph". The "text" that you see is, as far as the scan is concerned, just a picture that happens to resemble letters and words.

                    If you had scanned a photo of your house, where do you think you should be able to type??

                    PDF's that are designed to be "filled in" actually define regions in the "image" where text will be accepted. You click on a "field" and can type into that area -- before moving on to another "field". (You can also define things like check boxes that can be "checked" by the user).

                    With this in mind, think of your document as a photograph that you want to scribble on.

                    So, save it in a photo format (PNG, GIF, BMP, TIF, JPG, etc.). Then, use a photo editor ("Paint" is part of all Windows releases) to open the file. Click on the "Text" tool (looks like an uppercase 'A' on the toolbar at the top ~center). Drag a box on the image to indicate where you want to type. Select an appropriate font, font size, style, color, etc. Then, type what you want into the box.

                    What you will quickly discover is that you can't EDIT -- or MOVE after you've left "text mode"! -- what you have typed! You are, in effect, just scribbling directly onto the image (programs like Illustrator and Photoshop treat the text as if it was a separate "object" that could be manipulated independent of the underlying image). If you want to make changes, you have to "scribble OVER" what you already wrote!

                    So, with this in mind, type what you want on a blank portion of the screen (something that is a solid color identical to the background in the area that you want to type; typically, this would be white). Get the text, size, font, etc. right. Then, "select" that area (use the "Select" tool to draw a box that JUST contains the text of interest. Then, drag the box to the place on the image where you want the text to be.

                    The area where the text had been originally will be replaced with an empty "white" (or, whatever "color 2" happens to be -- look at the toolbar) box.

                    Lather, rinse, repeat. Attached a screen capture (equivalent of a "scan" -- it's just a "picture"!) of what I've typed and steps to manipulate it using Paint.

                    (sorry the images kinda ran together like that...)

                    This is far from an ideal solution. But, works without having to install any other software.
                    Good LAWD auto! Lol I will try and give it a shot. Thank y’all!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by #LHB# View Post
                      Good LAWD auto! Lol I will try and give it a shot. Thank y?all!
                      Sorry, that's the problem with trying to do something without a tool designed for that purpose. I don't like adding tools unless I really need them (to avoid the inevitable: "You need to reinstall windows" problem that seems to come when a machine gets too cluttered).

                      OTOH, this sort of "ability" can be helpful in other places where you want to alter something in a way that isn't directly supported by the tools you have at hand. E.g., you could manually place individual letters along a curve if you so desired, like creating a fancy logo (something that fancier tools will do automatically).

                      (If you intend on doing this often, then a better tool is advised)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I have to fill out a lot of forms for the farming operation so I was trying to find a way to put it on the computer to fill out. So I wouldn’t have to get others to fill it in.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by #LHB# View Post
                          I have to fill out a lot of forms for the farming operation so I was trying to find a way to put it on the computer to fill out. So I wouldn?t have to get others to fill it in.
                          Are the forms repeated periodically? Or, do you only encounter a particular form once?

                          E.g., a timesheet would be the sort of form that you keep reusing -- but filled in with different data each week.

                          OTOH, a will is the sort of form you'd typically only fill out once (or twice?).

                          If you are revisiting the same forms over and over again, it may be prudent to get a tool that will let you add "fields" to an existing "graphic" (i.e., scanned image of the form). Once the fields have been defined and positioned (e.g., drawing the outlines of boxes on the page where the information will be typed), you can save the "blank form". Then, each time you need to fill out a copy of that form, you'd click in each field, one at a time, and type in the pertinent information. Save the result (under a different name from the "blank" form) and/or print a copy of it "filled in".

                          I use Adobe Acrobat for this purpose ($$) but I think there are free tools that operate similarly (Foxit Reader?).

                          In my case, I usually have the "form" (image) on my computer -- typically something I've typed up in FrameMaker (a tool similar to MSWord). When I'm done with the basic form, I "print" it to a "PDF Printer" -- a program that automatically makes a PDF out of whatever gets sent to it. Then, I open that PDF in Acrobat and manually add in the fields.

                          I'll be doing that, this week, to make an inventory form for a DME lending library, here. I have to create the form, then make it usable ("fillable").

                          If you are handling lots of different forms -- never the same form twice -- then what you really want is just to be able to type text OVER an image. Unlike the ad hoc method I mentioned up-thread (hard to erase and replace and reposition text), you'd want the text to be treated as existing on a different "layer" above the scanned image. In that way, it doesn't become part of the image until printed on paper.

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                            #14
                            Windows 10 is the worse piece of crap ever so far. I won't even use it. Its that bad. Windows 7 works great so does my windows 8.1. But windows 10 is nothing but a nightmare to say the lease. Widows 10 may work better if you have a high speed connection. But were I live lucky you get 2 mg. Downloads when you want to use it....then you can't use it while it updates which is at least 4 hours at a time. Wish I could update when I wanted like all the other rather than this windows 10 crap.
                            Art

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                              #15
                              A little late to the party, but later versions of Adobe Reader (Version 11 and above) allows you to type on a document and save the changes.

                              On the toolbar, select Tools and on the next screen, select Fill & Sign. Once clicked, your document will be displayed and your mouse pointer will appear as '|Ab'.
                              When you click your mouse, it will open a text box where you clicked where you can type your text - this works on scanned document too. When you are done, save your document as usual.
                              Attached Files
                              T4 complete since 30 April 2012

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