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    Ram... how much is enough?

    I bought an Acer laptop from Walmart.
    Acer Aspire E5-575-54E8 15.6" Laptop, Windows 10 Home, Intel Core i5-6200U Dual-Core Processor, 6GB Memory, 1TB Hard Drive

    It has a 2gb and 4gb memory module already installed.
    I had planned on taking out the 2gb and replacing it with a 16gb stick, but is that more than is needed if I'm not playing memory hungry games?
    Amazon has an 8gb stick for $31.99 and a 16gb stick for $51.99. If it were you, and you're not exactly swimming in disposable cash, which would you select?

    #2
    So 12GB (8 + 4) should be enough if you aren't gaming or working with large spreadsheets. If you had the extra cash, you can never have enough RAM but I have a Windows 10 laptop w/ 16gb of RAM and I never see it go above 12 unless I am running a VM w/ 8gb of RAM.

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      #3
      8GB of ram on a laptop is fine for the most users, 12GB is more then enough for that laptop, personally I would get this https://www.amazon.com/Acer-Aspire-N...k_ql_qh_dp_hza it drops bellow $500 once in a while.
      c6/7 incomplete 6/30/07

      whats that smell? its me, cause im the shit.


      если я сейчас умру то нахуй я родился

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        #4
        Oh, dear Lord, I think I made a mistake buying this laptop. I just looked on youtube about how to upgrade ram. You have to remove 18 screws, pop the keyboard top off and then take part of the motherboard apart to access the ram. This is the most idiotically built laptop I've ever owned. I really don't want to, but I might just return this thing. F'ing ridiculous...

        Wait, maybe not... I was watching a slightly different model. A model more like mine looks 10x easier. I'll check it in the morning. But still, terrible design for upgrading.
        Last edited by Scott C4/5; 3 Jul 2016, 10:34 PM.

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          #5
          Curious: Does Windows 10 still have the ability to utilize USB (or memory cards like SD cards) - as additional RAM? It's a bit slower than real RAM, but it makes a difference on a desktop when needed (like, on a work computer when budget specifically prohibits RAM upgrades to enough to get the job done).

          This would just mean reviewing materials (paperwork / online guides) to see what limitations a Windows 10 computer with your specs would have. Then (at least in the old days, a few years ago), this just means buying the right size memory chip for the RAM...I know it previously (in my experience) had a limitation where you could only use 4GB of your USB stick / SD card / etc. as additional RAM...so if you plugged in a 16GB stick, you'd only use 4GB of it for RAM, and then the system would see 12GB as available for your portable files.

          USB sticks are very cheap now, 8GB or 16GB for below $10, so if this was possible at speeds that were alright with you, it may fit in your budget better.

          For my desktop machines that utilized this, I just stuck the USB stick (in a direct port, not one from a hub) - and let it be. In the rare cases I needed that particular port for something, I just pulled it out for a little while until I was done.

          Good luck!
          Mystery

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            #6
            I would do this only if you needed more memory for a brief period of time. Not only will it slow down your computer, USB sticks have a limited number of writes and you will quickly destroy the USB drive. If you need more memory it is best just to buy it. RAM is not expensive.

            Originally posted by Mystery View Post
            Curious: Does Windows 10 still have the ability to utilize USB (or memory cards like SD cards) - as additional RAM? It's a bit slower than real RAM, but it makes a difference on a desktop when needed (like, on a work computer when budget specifically prohibits RAM upgrades to enough to get the job done).

            This would just mean reviewing materials (paperwork / online guides) to see what limitations a Windows 10 computer with your specs would have. Then (at least in the old days, a few years ago), this just means buying the right size memory chip for the RAM...I know it previously (in my experience) had a limitation where you could only use 4GB of your USB stick / SD card / etc. as additional RAM...so if you plugged in a 16GB stick, you'd only use 4GB of it for RAM, and then the system would see 12GB as available for your portable files.

            USB sticks are very cheap now, 8GB or 16GB for below $10, so if this was possible at speeds that were alright with you, it may fit in your budget better.

            For my desktop machines that utilized this, I just stuck the USB stick (in a direct port, not one from a hub) - and let it be. In the rare cases I needed that particular port for something, I just pulled it out for a little while until I was done.

            Good luck!
            Mystery

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              #7
              I discovered that changing ram in my laptop is very simple and decided to go with an 8gb for now. It should handle everything that I'm doing and if I need more in the future it'll cost less then anyway.

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                #8
                I am a firm believer in more RAM is better. Have 16 GB in my new laptop and 64 GB in my new desktop.

                one of the main reasons is I use voice recognition and the more RAM you have the better it will work.

                The reason voice-recognition works well today is because of the processing power and the cheap memory available.

                I was a beta tester For IBM Via Voice and another software recognition package I don't remember but it wasn't Dragon Naturally Speaking, this was in the early 90s an they just did not work.

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                  #9
                  Software is a gas. It will fill any container. I always max out memory when I order machine so that it is covered by warranty and gets a good burn in. This means that I am able to upgrade the software on the machine later.

                  GNU/Linux and userland optimised for ARM and G4 is compact. Going to move my G4 from Debian to Gentoo so I can run altivec builds. The SPARC will get v9 builds too.

                  Winblows is not compact so get as much as you fit. If its 32-bit physical then you are limited to 3GiByte as top GiByte is used by PCI. If its server class pro such as Xeon then you put lots of memory on. Lots of memory needs to be ECC as memory is error prone.
                  Last edited by zagam; 17 Aug 2016, 10:41 PM. Reason: More memory allows software upgrade
                  http://zagam.net/

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                    #10
                    USB is not RAM. You can swap to rotating disc, but as Cray said virtual memory is like virtual sex and is not as good as the real thing.

                    SDRAM is real memory. So are SRAM, MRAM and NOR FLASH. This is where you load things.

                    NAND FLASH, SD Cards, USB pen drives, SSDs, discs, etc. are not memory they are mass storage and always measured in SI in civilised metric countries. However, block size generally matches page size as you need to get it in to real memory to do anything with it. This is where you put files.

                    Even with lots of memory you also need lots of swap. Suspend will not work if you do not have enough. If you have a rotating disc then that is where you put swap as it is large and cheap. Having swap on flash is very bad. Having Microsoft file systems on flash is also very bad.
                    http://zagam.net/

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                      #11
                      Get as much RAM as you can. If you have enough, you can turn off the virtual memory so Windows stops using the hard drive for excessive stuff in your computer just goes faster. If you have a desktop, there's different speeds of RAM you can get. I used to overclock a lot so I get the fastest RAM I could. That was a long time ago and I don't use desktops very often anymore and I Don't think it's a good idea to overclock a laptop. The processor needs to be well cooled to do that because it takes extra energy to do it which can make your system get pretty hot Not to mention I don't think you can get into the BIOS to overclock a laptop Yep, I'm a geek. Ha ha. RAM is so cheap anymore and on most systems it's relatively simple to put it so if your fingers work, you can look up your system on YouTube on how to upgrade it on your own and save a penny or two.
                      C-5/6, 7-9-2000
                      Scottsdale, AZ

                      Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

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