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    Windows 10 problem

    I knew things were going too smoothly with my new computer running Windows 10. I have not had any software problems so far. But it is time to make a recovery disk and I encountered a brick wall. I followed all the directions for making a recovery USB flash drive. When it comes to the point of "backing up system files" progress continues until the progress line appears to be at about the half way point. Then suddenly the popup window changes to an error message:

    Unable to create a recovery drive

    A PROBLEM HAS OCCURRED WHILE CREATING THE RECOVERY DRIVE


    No details or error code that can be looked up. I tried making the recovery drive 2 times on 2 different 32 Gb drives that exceeded the size requirements. I have not been able to find a solution online. However it does appear that others are experiencing the same thing. Any of you windows experts have a suggestion? I am very concerned because the hard drive does not appear to be partitioned with a recovery file on it. The computer came with Windows 10 installed.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

    #2
    Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    ...clip... I tried making the recovery drive 2 times on 2 different 32 Gb drives that exceeded the size requirements. ...clip...
    Thumbs have gotten cheap. Try a bigger one, although just this morning my wife created the rescue disk for her brand new win 8.1 laptop using one 16GB thumbdrive.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

    Comment


      #3
      I used my SanDisk 32GB to create a recovery drive for Win 10 without problems. It's formatted with FAT32 and the total space used is only 9.53GB. FAT32 is good and actually has transfer rates high than NTFS, but FAT32 has a 4GB limit on single file size. All the files copied to my SanDisk are under that 4GB limit (I checked). I guess you could try again with a USB flashdrive formatted with NTFS. I don't understand why Windows would screw this up during the recovery disk process, but it's worth a try.

      If you bought a new computer, I'm sure there is a recovery partition. It's hidden. Use "Disk Management" to see it. It should show. You might be surprised how many other partitions there can be hidden on a computer. I've seen laptops with 5 or more of these partitions (usually quite small) from the factory.

      I also make a backup image for any new computer once I uninstall all that extra crap they install. I used to use Norton Ghost. Lately I've been using the free version of Macrium Reflect. It can mirror all partitions or a single one on a drive. You can select all partitions or any one partition during recovery.

      Comment


        #4
        Here is what I have on the hard drive (C). If I am reading it csorrectly theredoes appear to be a recovery disk. The D drive is my 32 Gb Sandisk usb drive that I made my last attempt at making the recovery.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	c drive.jpg
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        You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
        http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

        See my personal webpage @
        http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

        Comment


          #5
          Are you plugging it in to a USB 2.0 or 3.0? Some USB flash drives work best with USB 2.0. You could also try backing up with your DVD drive. If nothing else, it would rule out weather or not it is the flash drive that is causing the problem.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by ala View Post
            I used my SanDisk 32GB to create a recovery drive for Win 10 without problems. It's formatted with FAT32 and the total space used is only 9.53GB. FAT32 is good and actually has transfer rates high than NTFS, but FAT32 has a 4GB limit on single file size. All the files copied to my SanDisk are under that 4GB limit (I checked). I guess you could try again with a USB flashdrive formatted with NTFS. I don't understand why Windows would screw this up during the recovery disk process, but it's worth a try.

            If you bought a new computer, I'm sure there is a recovery partition. It's hidden. Use "Disk Management" to see it. It should show. You might be surprised how many other partitions there can be hidden on a computer. I've seen laptops with 5 or more of these partitions (usually quite small) from the factory.

            I also make a backup image for any new computer once I uninstall all that extra crap they install. I used to use Norton Ghost. Lately I've been using the free version of Macrium Reflect. It can mirror all partitions or a single one on a drive. You can select all partitions or any one partition during recovery.
            Here is what's happening. I managed to make a "system repair disk" on a DVD. I then tried to make a "system image backup." I got a message saying that I need at least a 55Gb NTFS formatted drive. The biggest USB flash drive I have is 32Gb so that is out of the picture for now. That gave me the idea that maybe the NTSF formatted drive might solve the recovery disk problem as you suggested. So I formatted the drive and started through the recovery disk creation process. The first thing that happens is that it reformats the disk with FAT and there is no way to change that. At this point I am left with the alternative of buying a 72Gb flash drive and trying it. However that may just lead to another "unable to create recovery disk" message. Surely there is an explanation for what is happening but apparently Microsoft is not talking about it yet. Arrrgh!
            You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
            http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

            See my personal webpage @
            http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

            Comment


              #7
              I have tried updates before like this....never works out....Just buy a new puter with 10 on it.
              Art

              Comment


                #8
                Imaging a drive will take up a lot of space. Even before you install any of your own programs, the backup image size will be quite large. But of course a good imaging program will typically use compression by default. Uncompressed, your backup will be huge, even for just the C partition with the OS. (Is this what you are trying to do?) Also, it isn't always necessary to image the entire drive (all partitions). That's only necessary if your hard drive fails entirely. That doesn't usually happen. It's more likely your OS partition will become corrupted.

                Using medium compression (of just the Win 10 installed stuff) might give you a more manageable image size if you're really hard-up for external disk real estate, when imaging a drive or partition. Medium compression is a standard. I personally would not use a USB Flash drive for this purpose. They're too unreliable. Get your self an external USB drive for images. A 1TB drive costs around $60 or so. They're just a case with a laptop size drive in them. You can image everything with that and still have room for regular file backups. A 128GB flash drive will cost $35-$45.

                Nowadays, OS, applications, and saved files are so large that you need a lot of room for backups. Using a DVD as a boot drive for recovery programs is fine. But the days of using DVDs for backing up everything else are over. Even single layer Blu-rays only hold 23GB.

                I guess I'm not surprised that the recovery disk process would reformat to FAT32. That is the standard file system for a flash drive.

                Note: a "system recovery disk" is just a boot disk with the DOS applications necessary to backup your system from another source, like your recovery partition. It's not very large. Like I said, in my case it was only 9.53GB. In Macrium Reflect that size is only 203MB. A "system image" backup can be dozens or hundreds of Gigabytes.

                I have recovered many hard drives from image backups successfully. Sometimes it's the easiest way to recover from a nasty virus.
                Last edited by ala; 20 Aug 2015, 9:08 PM.

                Comment


                  #9
                  [QUOTE=Art454;1776256]I have tried updates before like this....never works out....Just buy a new puter with 10 on it.[/QUOTE

                  That's what I am dealing with: A new Dell computer with factory installed Windows 10.
                  You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                  http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                  See my personal webpage @
                  http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                  Comment


                    #10
                    ala, what my objective is is to make a bootable recovery disk like Microsoft advises. Hard drive failures have occurred with all seven of my computers over the past 30 years or so except the first one. It got fried from a lightning strike.

                    Your suggestion about getting a USB hard drive is a good idea. But dammit, I just want to do what Microsoft and Windows instructions say users are supposed to do using the provided tool.
                    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                    See my personal webpage @
                    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                    Comment


                      #11
                      [QUOTE=SCIfor55yrs.;1776292]
                      Originally posted by Art454 View Post
                      I have tried updates before like this....never works out....Just buy a new puter with 10 on it.[/QUOTE

                      That's what I am dealing with: A new Dell computer with factory installed Windows 10.
                      Sorry 55 didn't read it all the way though. Did you buy it with windows 8.1 then install the 10?. Call dell and see if they can find the fix for it.
                      Why I always wait about 6 months after a new os before I buy one.
                      Art

                      Comment


                        #12
                        You should be able to make a copy of it since they don't give you cd's anymore you have to make them yourself.
                        Since 10 is so new dell probably don't know the answers yet either......lol
                        GL 55 and let us know what happens.
                        Art

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
                          ala, what my objective is is to make a bootable recovery disk like Microsoft advises. Hard drive failures have occurred with all seven of my computers over the past 30 years or so except the first one. It got fried from a lightning strike.

                          Your suggestion about getting a USB hard drive is a good idea. But dammit, I just want to do what Microsoft and Windows instructions say users are supposed to do using the provided tool.
                          You should be able to make one easy if you have a cd buner with your puter....I did with my windows 8.1 and it took 3 disk just name them 1 2 3 and so on. I think my windows 8.1 took 3 disk. You may ask dell to make them for you....as I did and they sent them to me free.
                          Art

                          Comment


                            #14
                            If it came with windows 10 on it....I bet dell just upgraded it to 10 with 8.1 on it since they have so many 8.1 left over.
                            That my be your real problem. I would be mad to if I had to buy usb stick just for that and can't use it anymore because you got windows 10 on it. CD,S disk are cheap compared to a big stick......lol
                            Art

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I am running virtually the same system as you are (Dell with Win10), except my hard drive has one extra partition to allow for to dual booting with Linux.

                              The recovery drive can be USB. Mine recommended at least 16 gb of space, but only used 8.2. I used a Sandisc Cruzer Glide 16 gb for this task. This took about 45 minutes to create using a USB 2.0 to create it with no problems.

                              If you want to create a System Image, the information in your post sounds about right. My Image was estimated to be about 120 gb. It turned out to be 102. I used Dvds for the Disk Image because it was the cheapest option. It took 12 discs (8.5 gb capacity each disc) to complete and it was literally a day long project. The costs of the discs in total was about $16.

                              I also created a System Repair Disc on DVD. It only took about an half hour to create and used 402 MB of space.


                              I hope this helps.

                              I just tested the recovery USB drive and the repair disc. They both have identical options to choose from and are bootable drives. The only difference that I can see is that the USB recovery drive stores more information than the repair disk. So, that would probably be the best one to start with if you ever have problems. I don't see any need for the repair disc, if you have the USB recovery drive, but if you can not get the usb to work for whatever reason the repair disc would work but it has less information stored on it.
                              Last edited by Sugarcube; 22 Aug 2015, 5:40 AM. Reason: Added some information

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