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    New thread: how to be smart as caregivers

    Carry on.
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

    #2
    LOLoudest Ami!!!

    **Hugs** and here's to a new day.

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      #3
      Understand the need to protect your own health as well as the one you care for.

      Don't take foolish risks, punch a pillow every now and then, drink lots of water.
      "Leela, you look beautiful. Incidentally, my favorite artist is Picasso."

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        #4
        Allow the person being cared for as much independence as possible. Don't do things for them they can do themselves, even if its easier for you to do it.
        BeeBee

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          #5
          Take a yearly cruise and have a massage every day of the cruise...
          T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

          My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

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            #6
            Get help (ie, a PCA or other family member) if at all possible. There is no way someone can do this 24/7 and not crack up or become physically ill themselves.

            Get respite care if possible.

            Get appropriate lifting and movement equipment. You don't have to do this all manually.

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              #7
              take notes, even if they are scribbled on the backs of envelopes, especially if you're new to this.

              when you look through them after a little time, you'll have the satisfaction of seeing that what you were stressing about is no longer a problem

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                #8
                Keep lists and some sort of journal. That way you know what doctor was seen when, his name, where his office was. I have trouble keeping track of things, age just makes it worse as the variety of doctors keeps expanding.
                Blog:
                Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

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                  #9
                  Keep your computer backed up. All hard drives fail eventually.
                  Blog:
                  Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

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                    #10
                    Keep your sense of humor. It may save your azz when nothing else will.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by BeeBee
                      Allow the person being cared for as much independence as possible. Don't do things for them they can do themselves, even if its easier for you to do it.
                      I wanted to double emphasize this. I don't care if they don't want to do it, or it takes a long time, or it's hard. If they're not children (or brain-injured), adults should be treated like adults.

                      If they have nothing else to do all day, and it takes 3 hours for them to dress themselves, let them. Nothing but good will come from a day spent that way.

                      I firmly believe any injury over c5 can fold kitchen towels and washcloths, usually bath towels too. I also firmly believe it is good for the fingers and the self-esteem to do so.
                      Blog:
                      Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

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                        #12
                        hang out with people who don't feel sorry for you. nothing kills the spirit like pity, and nothing lifts it up like respect. (cc is a great place for this!)

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                          #13
                          Early in my husband’s injury, I felt like I literally had no life. My entire life was all about his life and 100% consumed with SCI. That is all I thought about. My new strategy is to pretend I’m not a caregiver sometimes. I go to work 3 days a week with colleagues that I have known for 16 years. When I’m at work, I block out my job at home. Yes my colleagues know that my husband is paralyzed, but they have no idea what that means for me. I have come to work after changing a cath, cleaning a gallon of urine off the floor, or doing the bowel program. Nobody has a clue. Sometime I snicker to myself when I walk into my office; if my colleagues only knew what I was doing an hour ago. It’s kind of wacky, but it makes me feel like me again. I never really talk about the caregiving stuff at work. It’s my time to forget about my real job which is the one at home.

                          Trish

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                            #14
                            What I'm figuring out (yes, I'm slow) is that ... my coping method is to complain!

                            It really really really really helps me to yelp and gripe and complain and have someone who knows what it is like to just say "yeah man, that soooooooooo sux. yeah. whoa. it super super sux. (optional insertion of equally godawful story of their own here)". Then I can say, "yeah, SUX TO BE ME" and then I'm over it. And fairly soon after, I laugh at the absurdity of whatever it was, like the odds of giving myself a massive concussion from merely standing up.


                            -- Ami, a whiner to be reckoned with!! and who is posting her (apparently fairly unique) style of how to be smart as a caregiver
                            Last edited by zillazangel; 13 Jan 2007, 1:36 PM.
                            Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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                              #15
                              You just don't really "uderstand", until you meet Ami. or hang out.

                              LOL

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