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  • Why do some of some of the dumbest people chose

    Why do some of some of the dumbest people chose the caregiving profession?
    I mean if breathing required thought, these poor people....

  • #2
    Money is in the medicine field.

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    • #3
      Caregivers

      A recent ad in Newsday for a home care agency offered 10$ an hour-own transportation. Try living on LI on10$ an hour.
      Finbar

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      • #4
        I did it. I had a brain. I remember going tharn a few times when it became servitude, or slavery. I think people get burned out, and leave their mind in the back closet somewhere.

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        • #5
          A lot of people in non-professional caregiving (PCAs, for example) are working poor who have a limited education or limited intellect and cannot get other jobs that pay better. Asking good questions during your interview that require some thinking can help to weed them out. One of the reasons we also used to look for college students when interviewing for my mother's needs (not that you can't get into college as one of the less sharp blades in the drawer now days).

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          • #6
            Caregivers

            To expect to get competent, intelligent, responsible care from someone who is on the books for 10$ /hr is to be totally disassociated from economic reality. In addition to whatever personal limitations they might have they are living on the edge personally. The Boston bombers wife worked 80 hrs/week.
            To get quality care you have to pay. One way is to advertise, negotiate a fair wage, send the person through an agency and top off the salary. I work on LI but don't live there. I guess you could get what you need for 17-18$/hr.
            Quite obviously care giving and caregivers are not highly valued in our society.
            Finbar

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            • #7
              I agree with what the others are saying Tim, but I totally understand your question.
              You can't make up some of the things that happen.
              One of Dave's best aides has been here 3 years. She can't remember how to make a pitcher of Crystal Lite or find a jar of peanut butter that is always in the same spot. She freaks out over spiders to the point I must go in and remove them. She forgets to fill out her time sheet and says in inappropriate things we overlook.
              Her good points far outweigh the silliness though.
              Last edited by LindaT; 05-23-2013, 10:32 AM. Reason: spell

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              • #8
                Because they are paid like teachers. Without the benefits.

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                • #9
                  It just doesn't require a "teacher's" level intellect to do this.

                  Originally posted by LindaT View Post
                  I agree with what the others are saying Tim, but I totally understand your question.
                  You can't make up some of the things that happen.
                  One of Dave's best aides has been here 3 years. She can't remember how to make a pitcher of Crystal Lite or find a jar of peanut butter that is always in the same spot. She freaks out over spiders to the point I must go in and remove them. She forgets to fill out her time sheet and says in inappropriate things we overlook.
                  Her good points far outweigh the silliness though.
                  My remarks were in context of a rhetorical rant, sorry, no offense intended, however my caregivers get at least $150/ day cash and given a room + utilities as a live-in.
                  In return I only ask for "do unto me as you would want done unto you" nothing more, nothing less, and oh yes;
                  be able to differentiate between monkey chow, and people chow. I mean I'm crazy about my monkey, but her food...not so much.

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                  • #10
                    I also in general think, that caregivers should get paid well, but Tim's seem to get fair pay, and I don't think that this has to do with the question of their intelligence or the lack of it.

                    Just this morning I had a tiny little incident that reminded me of this thread. One caregiver, Miss Bott, was here to get me out of bed as usual. She was accompanied by an apprentice, Saskia. Miss Bott only works part time because she goes to college in order to get a bachelor and master in the pedagogic of preventative care. She is always having problems with her job here but refuses to have some of the more experienced caregivers show her how she would have less problems. It has happened repeatedly that after she left I needed to call friends because I was sitting weird in my chair or something else wasn't right.

                    This morning she had me sitting on my bed when I realized that she had forgotten to put my shoes on. Well, then Saskia did that, and when I said with a smile, it was good to have the apprentice, this apprentice got all excited that poor Miss Bott had such a terribly hard time to do the care for me usually ALL ALONE, and how difficult that was, bla bla bla. I was really surprised about that strong reaction, because - honestly - I didn't think that to remember to put shoes on a quad before you put her in her wheelchair wasn't such a huge challenge that required great admiration.

                    I made the observation that there is more like a connection between personality and competence, and it is more a question of willingness to learn how to do a good job versus the arrogance of overestimating one's capabilities plus the ignorance of how the customer feels when the caregiver leaves (like: do I sit well in my wheelchair, is the catheter o.k. etc.).

                    I know that they don't have an easy job, and I do thank them oftentimes and tell them as often as I can, that they are doing a great job, and make little birthday and christmas gifts. But some of them I will just never get along with because of their carelessness (instead of true care).

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                    • #11
                      I just realized that it was me who wrote the last post here in February. Now I need to vent again and maybe get some help how to deal with a situation from last night.
                      The caregiver who gets me into bed oftentimes brings a smell of not well aired clothes. I had pointed that out in a nice way several times. The smell is so unpleasant because it stays in my room for at least half an hour, not to speak of the contact during transfer. Last night it was very bad again, and I said, that his sweater smells like it had not dried properly. His response got very mean: that my urine (I have a catheter and a leg and night bag) stinks and he had to endure that and my home smells bad and I wouldn't even realize any more in what a stinking place I lived.
                      It particularly hurt because I really try hard to keep the place nice and myself clean - like I always have flowers, clean up, open the doors to the patio, empty my legbag very carefully into the toilett, use deodorant etc. and to my usually sensitice nose and to others I ask it smells good in here.
                      The reason I put my question into this thread is, that the guy is not very psychologicly balanced. He is over 40 and still lives in his parents' house, and he told me that his father is emotionally abusive to the point where he would literally spit on his children. One of his brothers had comitted suicide a few years ago. But he himself has no desire to move out of there.
                      I know I shouldn't be upset, but being handicapped with no controll over bladder and bowels I am sensitive towards such statements; of course it's no fun to be helped with the procedure around the catheter.
                      Complaining to his boss wouldn't help: he always sides with his employees; and changing agencies is not easy, because most of the other caregivers I now have are very nice, and we developed a good routine over the years. It would take monthes to get to this point with a new agency.
                      Any help would be appreciated to get this stupid issue out of my head!

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                      • #12
                        That sounds like a really unpleasant experience. The caregiver lashed back, and that was out of line.

                        Is there any way you could ask to replace this one caregiver?

                        Honestly, I hate working with caregivers, and wish I had better advice to offer.

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                        • #13
                          thanks for understanding. It is a very small agency, no chance to replace him. My plan now is to de-escalade, hope to stay in controll in about an hour when he will be here.

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                          • #14
                            Regine, is it normal for agencies there to send male caregivers for personal care? That would make me profoundly uncomfortable, even if they were nice.

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                            • #15
                              This does not sound like a safe situation. His comments can be considered abusive and suggest you make plans to replace him soon.

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