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Best states to live in w/ a disability?

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    Best states to live in w/ a disability?

    Hi,

    I'm relatively new here, but not new to disability... c5 quad about 30 years post injury.

    I'm thinking about relocating to somewhere warmer, but I need to find a state that offers personal care helpers through state Medicaid. (Try as I might, I just can't go w/o some help each day.)

    Any info on where you live and what services your state provides will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

    #2
    Don't even think about California. They are cutting our IHSS (In Home Supportive Services) program right and left, with many recent reductions in services and hours. Many politicians are trying to eliminate the program all together. Waiting list for approval have grown spectacularly, and some counties are not even taking new applications. Medicaid (Medi-Cal in CA) is also being cut and what is covered being reduced.

    Here is a site that has some information about all state Medicaid programs: http://www.kff.org/medicaid/index.cfm

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


      #3
      new england

      Vermont and New Hampshire are pretty good in fdy opinion...but the winters are a challenge and the summers paradise!!

      Comment


        #4
        I'm also curious about this. We live in Europe, but if healthcare reforms really do happen in 2014 for insurance with pre-existing conditions, we may consider going back the the US.

        I've been doing some research, but it is difficult to find state by state comparisions for personal care help (I couldn't find it on the link SCI-Nurse gave).

        I would be interested in hearing about what coastal states, that are politically liberal and not too cold, have decent personal care help programs.

        I would also be interested in hearing from anyone who has gone through the immigration process with a disabled non-working partner -- perhaps that should be another post...
        Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by new dimension View Post
          Vermont and New Hampshire are pretty good in fdy opinion...but the winters are a challenge and the summers paradise!!
          I have to second New Hampshire. With that said, it's an old state with old state accessibility issues. I have a husband and I am small so he carries me if needed but otherwise we would be limited as many of the "small town" shops have no ramps.

          E
          There is no such thing as a stupid question but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots. -modified from despair.com

          Comment


            #6
            Florida -- Personal Attendant Care Program
            Dan Casady is the Admin and in a w/c
            http://www.doh.state.fl.us/workforce...CAbrochure.pdf

            Missouri -- ive heard from same level quads @ rugby tournaments that they get more services / financial help there opposed to here in fl.
            http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/C200-299/2080000903.HTM



            check out National Council on Independent Living (http://www.ncil.org/) for links to the state level Center for Independent Living in the warm weather states.

            good luck

            Comment


              #7
              Here is a site (Texas Council For Developmental Disabilities) for some good info on Texas. I live in San Antonio moved here from Chicago, access and getting around town is GREAT for anyone disabled. Being one of the largest military cities in the country with one of the largest rehab facilities make it a very comfortable environment with reasonable cost of living. Even one of my doctors is in a chair here.

              http://www.txddc.state.tx.us/index.asp

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Essie View Post
                I have to second New Hampshire. With that said, it's an old state with old state accessibility issues. I have a husband and I am small so he carries me if needed but otherwise we would be limited as many of the "small town" shops have no ramps.

                E
                Not sure where you are going but most old towns have some sort of ramp to get you in or maybe a back room door. North Conway is the only town that comes to mind but most are only 1-2 steps max.
                Tough Times Don't Last...Tough People Do!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks for the replies. Keep 'em coming!

                  I live in New England now, and although the services are there, the cold weather isn't cooperating with this quad. Housing here is expensive. Older cities and older buildings aren't always prime canidates for accessibility. But the big thing for me is the weather.

                  I'm looking for places that are warm and that have decent services (home health aides, etc) for PWD's.

                  I live alone, so stuff like food shopping is a real adventure in the winter. You can do it if you plan ahead and watch the weather forecasts (hoping they're accurate) but that's getting old. So am I, now that I think of it. Mainly, I'm tired of being cold half the year, tired of worrying about ice and snow, tired of wearing 3 shirts for 5 months, etc. Excessive heat's not tremendously better than excessive cold, but it is better.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Sorry, I was going to post a reply to rcechser but realized (after posting) that it served no benefit to the OP.

                    E
                    There is no such thing as a stupid question but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots. -modified from despair.com

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Florida has many great programs but be very careful about moving here if your paralysis is not the direct result of an injury. I have found no resources here for Transverse Myelitis. Same result -- different cause, does not matter.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        You might check Florida. There are many programs, but many waiting lists. However, there may be a waiver for some program you qualify for..... Also if you intend to go back to work in any capacity there is a great program through the Florida Association of CIL's called the JPASS program that serves most counties. There website is www.floridacils.org --Rules are very strict and for returning to work, but I THINK that can even be part time and a friend, family member, or spouse can be the PAID caregiver if needed. Just a thought.
                        Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I just know that a friend of mine with a traumatic SCI moved to Florida several years ago, and found the waiting list to get approved for PCA care to be months long. She ended up having to stay in a nursing home for over 5 months before she got approved, even though she was purchasing her own home (after selling hers in CA). Be VERY cautious about assuming that you will get benefits right away, even when they are present, esp. with the current economy and changes in state run programs.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                            I just know that a friend of mine with a traumatic SCI moved to Florida several years ago, and found the waiting list to get approved for PCA care to be months long. She ended up having to stay in a nursing home for over 5 months before she got approved, even though she was purchasing her own home (after selling hers in CA). Be VERY cautious about assuming that you will get benefits right away, even when they are present, esp. with the current economy and changes in state run programs.

                            (KLD)
                            This is my biggest concern, getting approval right away for PCA coverage as well as health insurance.

                            5 months in a nursing home isn't going to fly with me. If that's what's required to live there, then I'll look elsewhere, which might in fact be the reason why it takes so long to get approved. They don't WANT you there. 5 months is pretty good incentive to look elsewhere.

                            SCI is SCI, in Denver or San Diego or Miami. If your state says you need X services/help, then another state should automatically pop you into their program. You might not get the same exact services, but to wait 5 months and hope some nursing home doesn't kill you before then is inexcusable.

                            OK, so Florida's scratched off the list.

                            Anyone know anything about Arizona or New Mexico? I know that Nevada's terrible. (Actually, according to CIL's there, it's so bad that it would need to improve 10 fold to reach the level of "terrible." I was told a vent-dependent quad in Nevada typically gets ONE HOUR a day in coverage.)

                            Thanks!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I moved to Colorado in 1999 in large part due to accessibility and Medicaid home care coverage, while our system has issues like all states we have good advocacy organizations keeping the state honest. It does get cold here, but not like New England!
                              http://about.me/joshuawinkler

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