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Do you take your caregiver to work with you?

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    Do you take your caregiver to work with you?

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm new here and wanted to say hello. C4-6 complete quad.

    I've recently began looking into getting a job outside of the house and was wondering how the caregiver situation would work.

    Do you guys have any stories, suggestions or any general advice on how to handle the issue? Questions that quickly come to mind: does your caregiver stay with you all day at work? who pays for the assistance during work hours? do you get colleagues to help out instead of caregivers? etc. I'm sure there are many issues I haven't even thought of yet.

    Any and all information would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks

    (I originally posted this in the work forum, but got no response so I thought I would try it here)

    #2
    My husband, when he worked, had his caregiver take him to work in the morning and get him all situated (get his mouthstick set up, water, make sure his phone was in reach etc), then the caregiver would go home. Then the caregiver would come back at lunch and feed him lunch, cath him, do anything else he needed, and go back home. THen the caregiver would come back and pick him up at the end of the day. He rarely needed anything from coworkers other than to open the door to go outside if he wanted to get some fresh air.
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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      #3
      Originally posted by zillazangel View Post
      My husband, when he worked, had his caregiver take him to work in the morning and get him all situated (get his mouthstick set up, water, make sure his phone was in reach etc), then the caregiver would go home. Then the caregiver would come back at lunch and feed him lunch, cath him, do anything else he needed, and go back home. THen the caregiver would come back and pick him up at the end of the day. He rarely needed anything from coworkers other than to open the door to go outside if he wanted to get some fresh air.
      that's how my friend with severe cp has his set up. but most times for lunch, we just end up helping him eat. it really made no sense for someone else to drive over to help him if we were right there and would be together
      "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
      http://www.elportavoz.com/

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        #4
        Taking a caregiver to work is within reasonable boundaries. Make sure it is cleared with supervisor and human resources (HR). HR departments should have clear guidelines for people with disabilities.

        pbr
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #5
          I've been a caregiver for the past two years. I've never gone to work with any of my patients, but I would not see any problem with it. I agree with SCI Nurse in that it should be cleared first.

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            #6
            Prior to telecommuting I had my cargivers drop me off at the door and pick me up at the door. I would get meeting notes from a colleague in the meeting. Colleages would get a cup of tea when requested or printouts, copies, etc. For lunch colleages would volunteer and be placed in a monthly rotation. I would only ask close colleages to give a hand emptying my legbag when needed. Those I would ask I had a conversation with prior to ever having the need to insure they were comfotable enough and so as not to put them on the spot.

            If your job require you to have a lot of manuel assistance then speak with your supervisor and HR rep.

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              #7
              I'm C4/5 complete. When I began working FT 9 years ago, my intent was to have an attendant come in to help with lunch. But my co-workers would have none of that, and offered to help with me with lunch instead. Some have even been so kind as to bring in home-cooked meals!

              Comment


                #8
                Do you have a suprapubic cath? If so, mI'd recommend an auto-leg bag emptier, which is what I initially used going back to work. Gave me more independence and privacy. What kind of help do you foresee needing? You may want Voc Rehab on board once you start a job, to pay for an adaptive worksite assessment. That can result in many helpful modifications and/or equipment purchases that give you more independence.

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                  #9
                  i'm sorry, but hr is not your friend. they are there to protect bosses. talk to your medical ppl at work, not hr. have your doc in contact with work medical.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Was the attendant who went to work with a few people here paid through the Medicaid Buy-In program or another source?

                    If I were to work I'd use the Medicaid Buy-In program...working for the state would be ideal but there isn't much hiring at NYS.
                    C4/5 incomplete, 17 years since injury

                    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” - Carlos Castaneda

                    "We live not alone but chained to a creature of a different kingdom: our body." - Marcel Proust

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                      #11
                      Whether you bring a caregiver to work really does depend on your level of function. I am a C4/5 complete quad, and I have enough arm function to independently use a keyboard with a trackball (thankfully). I can get around to do most things on my own at work, but I do get help from coworkers with a few things (getting out my lunch so I can pick it up, getting out my 1 midday baclofen tablet, and occasional able-body-required housekeeping tasks around the office).

                      I did have to work with my employer to make sure that everything was set up for me to be this independent. They made sure that I had the type of trackball mouse that I like and am used to, they installed Dragon NaturallySpeaking and provided the microphone I wanted, and they installed automatic doors in areas that I needed to access. I also have to agree with the following:

                      Originally posted by anban View Post
                      I'd recommend an auto-leg bag emptier, which is what I initially used going back to work. Gave me more independence and privacy.
                      Having to rely on others to show up and cath or empty a catheter bag is stressful and reduces independence.

                      Anyway, I just wanted to give my thoughts from the perspective of AC for quad with a little recovery.
                      Last edited by EyesOfTexas; 7 Apr 2013, 2:20 PM. Reason: Dragon fail

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                        #12
                        Hi EyesOfTexas - Can I ask what sort of work you do? Do you have someone driving you to & from work?
                        C4/5 incomplete, 17 years since injury

                        "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” - Carlos Castaneda

                        "We live not alone but chained to a creature of a different kingdom: our body." - Marcel Proust

                        Comment

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