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    How many people employ live-in aides

    I'm wondering how many of youemploy live in aides or at least aides that maybe lived in your house temporarily? How did you find them? It seems like it would take and appropriate blend of personalities etc.. And also alot of rules and regulations regarding who's allowed in the house, their (the aides comings and goings etc.)
    thanks

    #2
    My mother has 4 PCAs total. One, who has been with her for 10 years now, lives in. She initially met her during a short (and AWFUL) nursing home stay when the PCA was working there as a CNA. She worked living out for nearly a year, then broke up with her boyfriend and needed a place to live. Since my parents lived in a big house, we offered for her to live-in temporarily, and she has been with her ever since. She has become a part of our family and like a sister to me. She went through the death of my father with us several years ago, and has stayed on and helped with the difficult transition of my mother's widowhood as well.

    She has another full time job (at a hospital) 2:30-10:30PM daily, and we give her the mornings and afternoons off on the weekend, so we have other part-time PCAs who take those shifts who do not live in. Normally she gets my mother up and does all her AM care M-F and puts her to bed 7 days/week. We pay her a monthly salary (figuring in her board and room into the amount she gets), and she has her own room, and uses the guest bathroom. She shares some meals and also cooks for herself so has use of the kitchen. She has her own TV and computer so does not have the use of my mother's except when doing things together with her (like watching a movie and fixing the popcorn). She does the laundry for both of them. She is the only PCA of the 4 that we allow to drive the van, so she is responsible for taking my mother to the store, most of the grocery shopping, out to restaurants (lunch mostly) and doctors' appointments. She of course also has her own car.

    Her mother also cleans house for my mother and we have had her family (brothers, sisters-in-laws, and nieces) over for special dinners, and they can visit with her in her room. She has her own phone line in addition to a cell so does not tie up my mother's phone.

    It is not easy to find live-in people, as most people do have their own lives and families and want to live with them. We lucked out and found this wonderful PCA after trying a couple of others part-time, and it has worked for us. Our other part-time PCAs have changed over the years but she has stayed with us.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      Canada has an amazing resource for qualified live-in people called the Canada Foreign Live-in Caregiver Program. The workers I've met, mostly from the Philippines, are amazing. I am employing one part-time right now and if I could clone her, our caregiving problems would be over. They all need to have a care aide course under their belts as well as being fluent in English to qualify.

      This afternoon I'm interviewing an RN from the Philippines who has taken the local vent training, on her own! It is for a friend of mine who's client support group I'm on. They are paid $8-$10 per hour for a 40 hour week. They kick back $350 for room and board. They must be provided a private room with a lock.

      If such a program is available in the US, I would look into it. But somehow I think it is uniquely Canadian.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Van Quad View Post
        If such a program is available in the US, I would look into it. But somehow I think it is uniquely Canadian.

        somehow I'd b et its uniquely Canadian also, but worth checking, maybe the program originates in the Philippines

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          #5
          aside from the part about your father (ssorry about that), this is a really nice story, I'm happy you found her.

          I've been hiring nursing students at the local University. They're quite young obviously, but also really surprisingly responsible. I've only had a problems once & that developed more from "youthful insensitivity". A couple have lasted their entire junior & senior years, before graduating and getting jobs at hospitals etc..and the ones who leave almost always find me new ones. I've played with the idea of hiring 2 or 3 of them every year or two. Offering free place to stay + some amount of $$ or perhaps pay part of their tuition or something.

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            #6
            Craig's List and a lotta luck

            Originally posted by wchair View Post
            I'm wondering how many of youemploy live in aides or at least aides that maybe lived in your house temporarily? How did you find them? It seems like it would take and appropriate blend of personalities etc.. And also alot of rules and regulations regarding who's allowed in the house, their (the aides comings and goings etc.)
            thanks
            Keep a single 24/7 caregiver. Two weekends/ month try to keep steady replacement. It's a tough go.

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              #7
              We have over the years, we find them on craigslist, and it usually is a short lived arrangement because I get too annoyed with someone living in my space, and they tend to get lazy quickly.
              Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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                #8
                How much do you guys/gals pay per month?

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by wchair View Post
                  somehow I'd b et its uniquely Canadian also, but worth checking, maybe the program originates in the Philippines
                  Most of the workers come from the Philippines and the vast majority of them are skilled and keen. Many come here as nannies but have care aide or even RN backgrounds. When offered the chance to work in their field of choice they will leave the nanny job.

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                    #10
                    $12/hour with rent being equal to the first $400 in wages.
                    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by zillazangel View Post
                      $12/hour with rent being equal to the first $400 in wages.
                      huh? (i'm math deprieved)
                      Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

                      I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

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                        #12
                        We pay $12/hour, so if the attendant works 60 hours a month, they get compensated $12 * 60 = $720, but we only give them $320 in cash and we keep back $400 as rent.
                        Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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                          #13
                          Thanks!
                          Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

                          I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Is that 12/hr for 8 hr/day or are they literally on call 24/7, in which case it's not an hourly wage?

                            If they have to respond, they are working. Are they in the house? Can they leave?

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                              #15
                              Oh definitely not 24/7 on call. In our situation, I am here all the time, with only brief forays here and there for errands. We negotiate specific hours for our PCA, even when they live-in, and the rest of the time they are off duty. So I never say, just because they are walking through the kitchen, "hey, could you cath Chad?". Typical hours would be 10-3 pm M, W, Friday. Outside of those very specific hours (or whatever they are), we do not ask the PCA to work at all. We just use rent as a way to lower our costs out of pocket (since we get no aid financially for his care), and to benefit the caregiver with low cost in a very nice home with alot of nice amenities. When its a good person, its a good deal all around. When its not a good person ...... it really really sucks. I've thrown out at least 4 live-ins because well, it sucks to have a live in person.
                              Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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