Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

good interview questions for a live in caregiver

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • good interview questions for a live in caregiver

    What questions outside of the obvious should I ask a possible live in caregiver. Its tough trying to determine a person you will be living with and depending on by a formal interview.

  • #2
    Just a few (we use these for live-in or out equally):

    Why do you want to do this kind of work?
    Tell me about your work habits.
    Tell me about a time when you needed to do something at work that was unpleasant.
    Are you a morning or evening person?
    What kind of music do you like? TV programs?
    Do you smoke? Drink? Use recreational drugs?
    What would your friends tell me about you?
    Tell me about a time you made a mistake and how you corrected it.
    Will I find anything unexpected if I get a background check done on you?

    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 06-06-2010, 04:37 PM.
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


    • #3
      Where are you currently living?
      If you are not hired, where will you be living?
      The biggest problem I had w/live-in attendants was they were more interested in a place to flop for a while rather than actually working. When they found another place to flop they would leave. Often w/o saying a word.

      Comment


      • #4
        What to ask for

        A. References
        B. Experience in related care
        C. Criminal Hx - for your safety

        DO HOT hire a CG if there cute and sexy!!! Mistake. Been there and done that.

        Originally posted by Eric.S View Post
        What questions outside of the obvious should I ask a possible live in caregiver. Its tough trying to determine a person you will be living with and depending on by a formal interview.
        Lynarrd Skynyrd Lives

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm a little bitter from my first live-in experience so these actually would not be a good idea, but I'd like to vent just a little.

          My instinct for questions at the moment would be:
          -- would you recognize this as a job where you are an employee rather than just a friend helping me out of the goodness of your heart when it is convenient?
          -- Do you think that just because something is difficult or distasteful it doesn't need to be done?
          --Do you think I am dumb because maybe you’re used to dealing with people who have Alzheimer's and don’t get out of bed?
          --How many hours a day do you need to spend on your cell phone?
          --Do you really think your two weeks of training lets you know more about my body and my needs that I do?
          -- Is it that inconsiderate of me to ask to live my life? Would you prefer I just never got out of bed so I don't need transferring help?
          --Do you think 9 PM is a reasonable time to expect me to go to bed, despite the fact that I last did so probably at age 8?
          -- Will you say "hmph” when I have the nerve to ask to go to the bathroom and then can't, as if the problems of my body are all just a ruse on my part to torment you?
          --Do you think it's reasonable to ask a live-in to work six hours per day over the course of the 16 not sleeping?
          --Do you think it would be polite and professional to call me selfish and stupid and mean just for asking for help with a few things?
          --Would you recognize that I still can feel them and intend to need them someday, and try to be careful therefore not to bang my ankles at every opportunity?
          -- How much do you usually spend on groceries, and will that change now that I am buying them?

          I realize this might make me sound like the witch. But I really did try to be as considerate as I could, as easy and low maintenance as possible. She was just unbearable.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by FreeBird View Post
            DO HOT hire a CG if there cute and sexy!!! Mistake. Been there and done that.
            There is one heck of a story in that pearl of wisdom isn't there, FreeBird?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by FreeBird View Post
              DO HOT hire a CG if there cute and sexy!!! Mistake. Been there and done that.
              You can do it if you don't desire to own them. Much better to have a beautiful lady around than the alternative.

              Comment


              • #8
                I had bad experience with helper too when I first had mobility difficulties and my flat wasn't adapted for wheelchair. I got helper 16 hours a week, it cost more than I was getting in DLA (my contribution - social services paid some of her wage).

                She didn't do what she said she would do in interview. ie I asked her work a sunday morning, she wouldn't do it but claimed the hours (get double pay on sundays and bank hols in UK).

                If I was stupid enough to mention I just needed housework doing next time she often would phone in sick but be back for next day when I needed to go shopping and I had to cover her petrol and food.

                I just went over her head to agency that found her and complained how you expect me to get ready to move house if helper wont turn up when I need any housework doing! Needless to say she turned up everyday for last few weeks before I moved and I fired her as soon as I got into a place where I could manage the kitchen and bathroom on my own!

                I'm managing as long as I can without help so can save up equipment, have started having more difficulty with speaking and now need communciation aid with strangers so it worries me that if I got another 'helper' like her they wouldn't take any notice of me cos I couldn't speak , shout or verbally complain at them!

                I haven't had a holiday since 2000 as I couldn't afford to pay someone to come with me and pay for my holiday and there's too!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ask if they drive. Most of the good questions are already posted above.
                  The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
                  --General George Patton

                  Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
                  ––Paul Nussbaum
                  usc87.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Not a question but I would include:

                    --Be cognizant of how important you are to my daily life. Call in sick with enough time for me to call in backup.

                    Originally posted by Random View Post
                    I'm a little bitter from my first live-in experience so these actually would not be a good idea, but I'd like to vent just a little.

                    My instinct for questions at the moment would be:
                    -- would you recognize this as a job where you are an employee rather than just a friend helping me out of the goodness of your heart when it is convenient?
                    -- Do you think that just because something is difficult or distasteful it doesn't need to be done?
                    --Do you think I am dumb because maybe you’re used to dealing with people who have Alzheimer's and don’t get out of bed?
                    --How many hours a day do you need to spend on your cell phone?
                    --Do you really think your two weeks of training lets you know more about my body and my needs that I do?
                    -- Is it that inconsiderate of me to ask to live my life? Would you prefer I just never got out of bed so I don't need transferring help?
                    --Do you think 9 PM is a reasonable time to expect me to go to bed, despite the fact that I last did so probably at age 8?
                    -- Will you say "hmph” when I have the nerve to ask to go to the bathroom and then can't, as if the problems of my body are all just a ruse on my part to torment you?
                    --Do you think it's reasonable to ask a live-in to work six hours per day over the course of the 16 not sleeping?
                    --Do you think it would be polite and professional to call me selfish and stupid and mean just for asking for help with a few things?
                    --Would you recognize that I still can feel them and intend to need them someday, and try to be careful therefore not to bang my ankles at every opportunity?
                    -- How much do you usually spend on groceries, and will that change now that I am buying them?

                    I realize this might make me sound like the witch. But I really did try to be as considerate as I could, as easy and low maintenance as possible. She was just unbearable.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      (DO HOT hire a CG if there cute and sexy!!! Mistake. Been there and done that.)

                      I am a young, attractive female caregiver. I have actually encountered problems in this area with the room mates of my clients. When with my client, I am at work and must maintain professional behavior. However, the room mates are in their home, often do not maintain professional behavior. On one occasion the male room mate of my client made inappropriate comments and advances over the course of six months. Upon discussion, the client brushed the incidents under the rug. The tension that built up caused me to leave the position even though I was otherwise very happy with the job and attached to my client, and the client was happy with me. Be aware that inasmuch as your caregiver's attitude and behavior affects your comfort, your attitude and behavior affect his or hers. If you find yourself attracted to a potential caregiver, or if you anticipate that another individual who will be present during "on-shift" times might develop an attraction to the caregiver, I strongly recommend that you not hire him/her UNLESS there are no qualified alternatives available.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        (I realize this might make me sound like the witch. But I really did try to be as considerate as I could, as easy and low maintenance as possible. She was just unbearable.)

                        Random - These concerns are in no way extreme and you don't sound like a witch. I am very sorry that you had such a bad experience.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The main fault here lies with client and his inability to control the situation vis-à-vis the out-of-control roommate. That roommate showed no concern for his disabled roommate's need to have dependable, skilled care and that when found, the utmost must be done to provide the correct working environment. By causing the caregiver to leave, the roommate caused undue hardship for his disabled roommate.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Since this old thread has popped up again...

                            Interviewing is a skill. Not all of us have a background that included making hiring decisions. Getting help is a good idea. There are plenty of online resources. You may be able to get advice from someone who has done it before.

                            First, identify and write down:
                            •what you need
                            •what you want
                            •what would be nice
                            •what isn't acceptable
                            Go over your list several times and at least once more with someone else.

                            When you do conduct an interview, it is a very nice thing to have someone there with you. Use a script if you need to. Try to get the person to open up to you instead of letting them try to show you what you want. Don't offer leading questions, instead imply with your attitude that it is ok to give a truthful answer that doesn't make them sound perfect.

                            Try to ask questions that allow open answers. For instance saying "Do you plan on taking Sunday off?" which sounds as if you insist that they don't if they want the job, say "It is important to me that you are able to maintain your own emotional and spiritual health. If you want to attend services, we will make sure you can." Shows them you care and provides them an opportunity to open up about a subject you are prohibited from asking about - their religion.

                            An icebreaker question is a good way of getting a person off the focus of selling you a prepared spiel. Remember, they want a job from you just as much as you want a helper. My favorite icebreaker was to sit them down and ask "tell me about the worst day you ever had." Let them talk for 3-5 minutes to get them calmed down and off guard.

                            I always did one thing a bit differently. Instead of interviewing in a conference room, I would use the break room. As they talked about their worst day, I would pour both of us a cup of coffee without asking (I had put cream and sugar on the table before they came in.) Once we were going, I had scripted at least two coworkers to come in, get a quick drink, wash their cup and set it in the drying rack. Partially, this was to see if the person handled interruptions well. The test was to see if at the end of the interview they would clean up their own cup. Someone who did was sharp enough to pick up on the clues and not so self centered as to expect someone else to clean up after them.

                            While it is totally not ok to manipulate, misdirect, or lie to an employee, you may want to do exactly those things to an interviewee. You need to know not only if they have the skills you need, but if they have the personality that you can live with.
                            Played with bombs- No SCI, Brain Damage enough that I require a chair and a caregiver.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X