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Summer Heat and Quads

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    Summer Heat and Quads

    Hi All-

    This is the first summer we face with my daughter's sci. She is currently at c6 level and I know I need to keep an eye out for overheating this summer.
    All winter she was running a little chillier than everyone else. Does this change in the summer? In other words, will she be cooler on an 80-degree day than the rest of us, the same, warmer? Is everyone different on this too?

    People mention squirt bottles to help mimick a "sweat." Do you spray where ever there is exposed skin or what?

    Thanks!

    #2
    with myself a c6/7 quad. i freeze and cant function all winter primarily. the spring is good except allergies. and the summer i usually stay out until i cant bare it, drink, go in AC room, pool, or just constantly need to pour water on my head and such if im out all day or its just getting too hot. splash some water. good luck hope i helped enjoy the summer.

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      #3
      I have a much harder time regulating temperature in the summer than I do the winter. I stay in shade and never travel without a thermos full of ice water. If it is ungodly hot I also take a couple of blue ice packs in a small insulated lunch carrier that can hang from the chair so that I can put them on my neck, chest, wherever it might help to cool me down.

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        #4
        if she cant sweat, she will be hotter...not cooler...be careful out in the heat for long period....experiment..if shes out for say 1 hr in the heat-- go in side and take her temperture...see how her body is handling it....gotta learn what she can tolerate
        - Rolling Thru Life -

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          #5
          Good suggestions. Whenever I get seriously over heated I have someone place a wet towel in the freezer for 10 - 15minutes and then have it placed on my bare torso. I used this technique last summer when Seattle was 103, works great!

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            #6
            My rehab doctor said I'm now a cold-blooded animal, like a snake. We take on the ambient temperature, which is rarely perfect. In the summer we get hotter, it is the pits. We are in serious danger of heatstroke. Also, once we get overheated it takes ages to cool off.

            Shade-umbrellas-squirt bottles-cooling vests-fans-wet towels-wet bandanas for the neck. If it's over 95, stay in the AC!
            Blog:
            Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

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              #7
              yes somewhat cold blooded animals now, thats what i say too

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                #8
                I find it really varies depending on the temperature and wind. If it's below 75, I usually wear a sweater or light jacket. 75-80 I can be outside doing pretty much as I want in short sleeves. 80-85 I can still be outside, but I try to stick to the shade. 85-90 I can be outside in the shade for a while, but need AC to cool off after. Above 90 and I go out as little as possible. Curiously, I can tell how I'm doing by touching my ears. They feel warm or cool to the touch long before I am otherwise aware of it.
                Tom

                "Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups." Exasperated 20:12

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                  #9
                  This is all very helpful, thanks all.

                  I'll just figure on a 85+ day to keep her in AC or in the pool, river or lake. (This is what she did pre-sci anyway, ha!) I'll also keep a washcloth in her bag so I can wet it when we get caught out in the heat waiting for a train or something. I just bought her a sunhat today too but she just entered her teen years so it may not be in her taste.

                  I worry about her having too many layers on...she has become attached to her binder as her belly starts to creep out, she loves to layer her tops, wear skater shoes, etc. so we have to work on that too.

                  Friday night we head to a Twins game and I think the temp is set to be around 80 but by gametime that will have cooled down a bit. BTW, they did an awesome job with the accessible seating at the new Twins ballpark...the sightlines are crazy good, easy to get to and plenty of spots. For more info, story here: http://www.startribune.com/local/914...oDEy3LGDiO7aiU

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                    #10
                    Hello! We are from MN too, 200 miles north of your area. The new ball park looks beautiful. I get the Mpls paper and read the article. I hope they win when you go.
                    I am confused about summer heat too. My husband was so cold all winter. It has finally warmed up the last few days and he still wants his sweatshirt and wool Carhartt hat on. He says he is not cold now, but wants his head gets cold since he is bald.

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                      #11
                      Thermoregulation is just as much a problem in the summer as in the winter for many people with SCI (esp. if your SCI is above about T6). Your body cannot vasodilate or sweat properly to cool your core in the summer in hot environments, and in the winter, it cannot vasoconstrict or shiver normally either. This causes a condition called poikilothermia.

                      Here is a handout you may find helpful on how to manage this, esp. how to avoid the dangers of heat stroke, which are very real for people with SCI. I have seen a number of deaths in people with SCI caused by heat stroke, and it can happen very easily.

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                        #12
                        i used to have super issues with the heat as a kid and pass out (we lived in cali) and now being in the land of perpetual winter (it SNOWED last week) winters are gross. i have gotten better at tolerating the extremes. can now go 6hrs but i just remember to drink LOTS of H2O/ find shade if need be and when i get home the first thing i do is wet a towel, put it on my head, take off my clothes and blast the fan on me for 10 min. i don't tolerate AC at all and i get very ill when in it for too long so i am not indoors much in the summer. so if u use AC try to keep it around 72 - 75 degrees as it can have the opposite effect of cooling down too much (which is why i avoid it as most places have it set too cold). i also have a shaved head, this really helps in the summer as with my thick dark hair it'd get hot way too quickly. dont forget ur sunscreen! also remember that H2O is reflective, so can actually increase the effects of the sun, so even if she is in a pool/river/lake/etc make sure u use suncreen and see if u can get those battery operated fans
                        "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
                        http://www.elportavoz.com/

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                          #13
                          Living in Arizona it commonly gets over 100° in the summertime, starting in June and lasting all the way through mid-September, with July and August being monsoon season so we get moisture in the air to. I keep a spray bottle on my chair and use it all the time, especially when getting in my van after it sat in a parking lot for a little bit. When I'm at home, I try to turn on for 10 minutes before a go anywhere and run the AC so the AC is nice and cool by the time you get in there. I've gotten too hot a couple of times where it's left me lightheaded as really nauseous causing me to have to get in bed, undressed and sprayed down really well to help cool me off. It can be scary and always make sure you have something to drink with you. Good luck getting it figured out in your state.
                          C-5/6, 7-9-2000
                          Scottsdale, AZ

                          Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

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                            #14
                            In my town they found a local quad baked/dead in the sun.
                            I'm not sure if he did it on purpose or if it was accidental though.
                            Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know that, so it goes on flying anyways--Mary Kay Ash

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                              #15
                              You have to be most careful in the sun because of radiant heating. Heat can become a life threat. I had my temp run up to nearly 106 3 times by the heat and had to be packed in ice. Once was when I was being filmed for a medical education film and was under the really hot lights. So much for the docs standing by. lol

                              Be careful of vehicles in the summer sun, especially if they and the upholstery are dark colors. I keep a thermometer in my van window. Here in South Carolina, the inside temp gets up to 140 F on sunny days with the van in the middle of an asphalt parking lot. Also, it is easy to get hands burned from trying to slow down or stop the wheelchair with coated rims. The heat from the sun + friction runs the temp up.
                              You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                              http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                              See my personal webpage @
                              http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

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