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Summer Heat and Quads

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    #16
    I love the sun. I have found keeping my head wet and drinking water makes biggest difference. C4/5 inc i dont sweat unless i have ad
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
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      #17
      Gatorade G2 really helps me in the summer to stay Hydrated from getting overheated

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        #18
        Last summer I used Cool Wraps, those bandana looking thingies you soak and wrap on your neck, head, whatever you can on your body. Those combined with mega h2o and loose, natural fiber clothing helped. Cool wraps come in a variety of colors, but even so they'll not win any fashion awards.

        I also wet my head when necessary.

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          #19
          Thanks for the link SCI nurse. This will be our first real summer as Dave was in the hospital most of the first one after SCI.

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            #20
            I'm C5 incomplete for nearly 40 yrs. and live in Florida year round.
            Summer heat is a big issue, and some meds, like Ditropan, can inhibit
            temperature regulation even further and make the heat more dangerous, so read up on that and be aware of meds + heat reactions.
            Wearing a brimmed hat with a cool pack in the crown helps me,
            plus those cool-gel bandanas, or even a regular cotton scarf or bandana dipped/wrung with cold water and tied around the neck can really help keep body temp. stay normal.
            A paper fan in hand is helpful, it could even be a fashion accessory.
            Stay under an umbrella, avoid being in direct sun or hot cars, and be sure to stay hydrated.
            It's very dangerous and unpleasant to find out too late that you're overheated.
            Coconut water is good for rehydrating.
            Stay cool!

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              #21
              I find that drinking does not cool me down like it would someone who is not paralyzed. The reason someone is supposed to drink lots when they are in the heat is too replace the water they sweat out and to have enough water in their body to make that sweat. Since I don’t sweat, all that drinking tons of water would do is make my feet swell up is it pools down in my legs.

              If I have to be outside on a hot day the most effective way for me to stay cool, besides staying out of the sun, is to take a bunch of washcloths, wet them and ring them out a bit, roll them up individually and put them in a Ziploc bag in the freezer. I take these with me in a cooler and when I get too hot I take one out, unroll it and place it on the back of my neck, where major blood vessels are close to the surface, to cool down my body. Running your wrists under cold water can also help cool down quickly.

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                #22
                CrashBang-
                Coconut water? Why does that seem to work better? My little chick would love this because it is on the exotic side. She is thirteen-year old "foodie" that would chat up the doctors and nurses about food/restaurants when she was in rehab.

                After reading the posts I know now that she has to be dressed like the rest of us when the hot stuff hits. So nice to see her without her winter trademark scarf and knit hat.

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                  #23
                  Weird question: Do you bring a thermometer along on hot days?
                  Even though it is supposed to be in the upper 70's today Dave still wants his sweatshirt and stocking cap. He has not been as terribly cold lately. We have not had to put blankets in the dryer etc.
                  How will I know if he is too hot?

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by LindaT View Post
                    Weird question: Do you bring a thermometer along on hot days?
                    Even though it is supposed to be in the upper 70's today Dave still wants his sweatshirt and stocking cap. He has not been as terribly cold lately. We have not had to put blankets in the dryer etc.
                    How will I know if he is too hot?
                    Hi Linda,
                    For me a sort of lethargy sets in, along with a feeling of mild nausea. It is my biggest warning sign to get someplace cool or drag out the blue ice for a little cooling down by putting it over a major artery, usually my neck. I think there is reason for concern, but don't let this thread scare you too much, as most of it is common sense stuff about not sitting in ungodly hot places, being in direct sun, and being underhydrated. Blue ice is my miracle product for summer, along with a good floppy brim hat to keep the sun off my face, which everyone should do anyway to avoid skin cancer.

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                      #25
                      yes, when u can't sweat u lose the ability to thermo-regulate, but it isn't quite as dangerous as it sounds. she can definitely get out and enjoy the sun & hot weather. drinking ice water & either misting the body with water or wiping with a wet towel (to simulate sweat) can cool the body down. i live in texas and been through many hot summers and never had a heatstroke. if ur prepared and know what ur doing, u need not worry. she'll know when she's gettn too hot.

                      in the winter, u get colder faster and then it's harder to warm back up. such is a quad's life.
                      http://www.dsportsman.com

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by betheny View Post
                        My rehab doctor said I'm now a cold-blooded animal, like a snake. We take on the ambient temperature, which is rarely perfect. In the summer we get hotter, it is the pits. We are in serious danger of heatstroke. Also, once we get overheated it takes ages to cool off.

                        Shade-umbrellas-squirt bottles-cooling vests-fans-wet towels-wet bandanas for the neck. If it's over 95, stay in the AC!
                        I've always loved the hot sun, whether pre-SCI or now. As others brought up though, it's a wrestling match for me as to enjoy as much wonderful hot sun as possible without suffering potential heat stroke.

                        It was in the high 80's today and being a Wisconsin resident who suffers through 6-7 months a year of miserable winter/fall, i felt like a drug addict soaking in the hot sun. It felt so good feeling that sun while walking my dog. After about 35-45 minutes though, i could feel myself really starting to overheat. To help with that, i bring a water bottle filled with ice water which i squirt on my head, face, and neck. Unfortunately it was a bit muggy also today, so even with the water bottle, i could only last about an hour before having to come back in the house and it took another 15-20 minutes to recover once inside.

                        I so much hate this aspect of my injury because i love the sun and heat so much to the point i almost crave it. I really miss the days of being able to be outside in the sun on a hot day for 4-5-6 hours straight.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by LindaT View Post
                          Weird question: Do you bring a thermometer along on hot days?
                          Even though it is supposed to be in the upper 70's today Dave still wants his sweatshirt and stocking cap. He has not been as terribly cold lately. We have not had to put blankets in the dryer etc.
                          How will I know if he is too hot?
                          He should know himself. When i start getting overheated, i'll feel weaker, sometimes lightheaded, and just a natural instinct feeling of i'm burning up inside to where i really should do things to cool off. Of course that's not a concrete thing, but generally the human body will tell you when something is wrong and you should listen to the warning sign/signs.

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                            #28
                            My wife uses damp washclothes and the cool gel tubes mentioned abpve. She also uses a mister - Misty Mate works very well, although they're not cheap and break easily. I'm told Walmart has a cheaper equivalent.
                            -Richard

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                              #29
                              It was hot and muggy in Minnesota today so I got a chance to put some of good advice to work. My girl craved the heat and sun and lapped it up for awhile and then came in to cool off after about a half hour. I had a gel pack in the freezer that we wrapped in a dish towel and I put it on the back of her neck/shoulders and she headed out again. Tonight though she got a little too warm when we were grilling out on the deck enjoying a late evening dinner. Just soooo muggy and no breeze. Again, she could tell she was getting hot and since it was shower night it was an easy cool down.

                              Today was a good little "test run" for all of us. I'm glad she is aware of when enough is enough and I'm glad I have some great tips up my sleeve for other hot days thanks to this site!

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                                #30
                                yesterday was the first time I was in the heat for the first time and we used the blue ice packs on my neck and shoulders, I don't sweat so my mother thought if I drank cold water it would help, nope, like Jeff B said it made me just retain water and get all swelled up. The ice packs worked well to cool me down.
                                the future takes a second to be...
                                so close your eyes..
                                and feel what is happening.

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