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    #46
    ouch crags, that is an issue. one reason i'm considering moving to a somewhat more 'cheaper' region. it's never been easy to get and keep good help and it's even more troublesome when in an already costly area.
    i currently live in the PNW and have had quite a bit of difficulty getting decent quality help though it seems a bit easier in more rural towns.

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      #47
      hmm...NO ONE should ever work for poor wages.

      It's all down to what's fair, say this woman is a very good carer but she cant make her services bills what do you kind of expect?. let's add to that she might have a mortgage or ever increasing rent on her apartment?, she needs to run a car and eat, then lets add in she could have kids?.

      Yep, that's not your problem, you are paying the going rate and that's basically all you need to know about. but she has her own set of problems and who will she look out for as first priority?...herself and her family.

      I think, you should fairly expect to pay up to $25 per hour.

      Sorry, $25 per hour sounds just insane, but come on would you do it for fucking $15 per hour??. To wipe my ass and listen to my "sage" musings on everything from "the shit on tv" to "these underpants itch". i'd be expecting to pay some poor sod like $100 bucks per hour!.

      p.s. dollar for dollar the US is roughly the same and it appears from these postings on this thread that private carers look to be paid as shittily as here in australia. Come on have some sympathy this lady you have working for you she might be just worth curtailing your life to have her 'round the clock excellent care.
      "The problem with self improvement is knowing when to quit." "Diamond" David Lee Roth.

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        #48
        Originally posted by WahWah View Post
        hmm...NO ONE should ever work for poor wages.

        It's all down to what's fair, say this woman is a very good carer but she cant make her services bills what do you kind of expect?. let's add to that she might have a mortgage or ever increasing rent on her apartment?, she needs to run a car and eat, then lets add in she could have kids?.

        Yep, that's not your problem, you are paying the going rate and that's basically all you need to know about. but she has her own set of problems and who will she look out for as first priority?...herself and her family.

        I think, you should fairly expect to pay up to $25 per hour.

        Sorry, $25 per hour sounds just insane, but come on would you do it for fucking $15 per hour??. To wipe my ass and listen to my "sage" musings on everything from "the shit on tv" to "these underpants itch". i'd be expecting to pay some poor sod like $100 bucks per hour!.

        p.s. dollar for dollar the US is roughly the same and it appears from these postings on this thread that private carers look to be paid as shittily as here in australia. Come on have some sympathy this lady you have working for you she might be just worth curtailing your life to have her 'round the clock excellent care.

        Yes, in an ideal world. But unfortunately many do not have the money. I suspect the safety net in Australia is a bit better, but I may be wrong.

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          #49
          I agree. Nice if you can pay your caregivers more, but for my mother, having to pay more would either have meant having to go with less hours of care (which she needed for safety) or instead having to go to a nursing home. Not many people with serious disabilities have unlimited funds to pay for PCA care, even if able to do private pay instead of agency. Those who have too much savings or income to qualify for Medicaid may find it even more difficult to manage the money needed to hire PCAs without any outside $$ assistance.

          And yes, we did provide significant amounts of other perks: birthday presents, Christmas presents, meals out at restaurants, and even a cruise (for the live-in PCA) to the PCAs we hired over the years.

          I was VERY explicit in my ads about the care involved for the wage we were paying, and still had no problem garnering 20 applicants every time I ran an ad in Craigs' List for PCAs. This was in a huge urban area (Los Angeles) with a fairly high cost of living.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            #50
            Getting "full-spectrum" care, from bowel care to dressing, just ain't going to happen around here for $15 an hour. People may take it without knowing what they're getting into, but odds are 50/50 they may not last. Those that do this type of work know how much it's worth monetarily. They may not be classified professionally to do it and therefore cannot charge the going LPN rate, but most are not going to do more skilled work at "companion" rates.

            When you're talking about simple "cup of tea", laundry, and meal prep for an elderly person who is a little unsteady on their feet and needs a companion for escorting to appointments then I would say that $15 an hour is possible around here. These people are dime a dozen and represent the largest pool of applicants that you need to choose from and hopefully can train to take their skills to the next level necessary.

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              #51
              hmm...the carer system in Australia isn't bad, you could probably read up on it somewhere, if you are interested.

              All i'm saying is loyalty only goes so far, if a person is offered more money somewhere else you gotta expect they might want to take it. I figure a person is loyal if they give you a chance to renegotiate if you want to retain their services. If they disrespectfully give you a stupid figure, tell them to go jump, but if they give you a carefully considered figure that maybe a bit over the standard you have to at least consider if its worth paying...and if you can afford it, if not you just have to say sorry I can't pay you that.

              Question might be, do i need full time care or just care at a few key times of the day?.

              If so could my spouse, friends or family step into the breach. If no, you do need a carer and i know it's VERY tough finding a good carer at a cheap and cheerful rate. I had a few ladies clean my house prior to my being in a chair, they were mostly hopeless, one was very nice to look at, one was very dumb and one was very good. It's, as you yanks say "A crap shoot".
              "The problem with self improvement is knowing when to quit." "Diamond" David Lee Roth.

              Comment


                #52
                Yes I agree, loyalty only goes so far. If you're paying below market rates, you can expect little loyalty, not to mention some unsavory people who do not know the value of their work and are desperate for a job. If you're paying just about average, you can expect a modicum of loyalty, provided there is personal chemistry and you are able to provide additional compensation perks that go above an xmas gift certificate to an Outback Steakhouse. If you are paying above market rates to any degree you may be taken advantage of, as we probably all have been in the past. However, if you're paying better than most and there is personal chemistry then you have a combination that has the best chance for long-term stability. Unfortunately, what you can afford to pay often comes down to the financial resources you have at hand. Plus, if you have nonpaid help, such as spouse, friends, children, etc., that allows you to pay higher wages for your paid help than if you had to spread the same available money amongst more help.

                Additionally, I find one of the best indicators for long-term stability is when people know there is a replacement to fill in for them when they are sick, on vacation, etc..

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                  #53
                  paying above market is not a guarantee of better service unless it us fully understood by the party being paid above market that because of their higher rate the payer has more say in how things are done and that it will be far easier to be sacked if advantage is taken of the employer.

                  I had a boss once tell me that i was being paid higher than award and average for my good work, but, if my work went backwards that just made me easier to sack.

                  You have to take a fully professional approach to an employee once they begin being paid above and beyond the average. let them know they are doing a good job (if they are) if they aren't doing a good job on their higher wage...they need to know they are on thin ice.
                  "The problem with self improvement is knowing when to quit." "Diamond" David Lee Roth.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    While we're on the subject here, what is the general consensus for the amount of total paid time off that employees should get? This would include holidays, vacation, sick, and personal. What I'm talking about an equal unit of paid time off for an equal unit of work. Meaning if they are just a morning only position, how many paid mornings off per year? Ditto for evening only workers.

                    My experience has shown me that there are some workers who are responsible with their obligations to caring for someone who is disabled and that a more flexible approach will suffice. However, there are others who in the absence of a defined number, will always take advantage of the situation and expect to be paid.

                    Now that I have changed my situation to have more help and requiring more money, I have less flexibility being generous with the everyday problems that occurr in people's lives. For every paid time off you give, it cost you double including the replacement backup, unless you have unpaid help such as parents, spouse, friends, etc.. However, living independently and alone without these options requires one to always have a backup and to budget in contingency financing in such regard.

                    I have been closely keeping track of all time off (paid and unpaid) for my four part-time employees for several years now and have an accurate number as to how much additional costs it is on a yearly and therefore monthly basis. This amount then needs to be added in too any budgeting process.

                    Comment


                      #55
                      By law, in Canada, we have to pay 4% vacation pay, or 6% to any employee working 5 years or longer. That pretty much eliminates the need to do any additional math. We also require 6-weeks notice for when my staff book their holiday time.

                      Comment


                        #56
                        Originally posted by crags View Post
                        While we're on the subject here, what is the general consensus for the amount of total paid time off that employees should get? This would include holidays, vacation, sick, and personal. What I'm talking about an equal unit of paid time off for an equal unit of work. Meaning if they are just a morning only position, how many paid mornings off per year? Ditto for evening only workers.

                        My experience has shown me that there are some workers who are responsible with their obligations to caring for someone who is disabled and that a more flexible approach will suffice. However, there are others who in the absence of a defined number, will always take advantage of the situation and expect to be paid.

                        Now that I have changed my situation to have more help and requiring more money, I have less flexibility being generous with the everyday problems that occurr in people's lives. For every paid time off you give, it cost you double including the replacement backup, unless you have unpaid help such as parents, spouse, friends, etc.. However, living independently and alone without these options requires one to always have a backup and to budget in contingency financing in such regard.

                        I have been closely keeping track of all time off (paid and unpaid) for my four part-time employees for several years now and have an accurate number as to how much additional costs it is on a yearly and therefore monthly basis. This amount then needs to be added in too any budgeting process.
                        When we have hourly workers, we don't give paid time off. With our current live in situation (he is the only caregiver besides me), we give 2 weeks a year paid time off.
                        Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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                          #57
                          For my mother, we gave the live in a paid vacation like above annually. The part time people got paid a partial shift if they called in sick, and if I went up to stay for a family holiday and gave them time off when providing my mother's care myself, we also paid them a partial shift amount.

                          In CA, technically you can only have an employee work 6 days/week, but we did not go by that. All were private pay. We did not claim this expense on taxes so this was primarily under the table, although we did pay by check. We paid no benefits otherwise, and did no withholding (taxes, Social Security, Workers Comp, etc.), which was included in and explained in the interviews and in the contract. We spelled out that they were independent contractors. Most had another job already which provided them with benefits such as health insurance (including our live-in) or had them through a spouse.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Good question, personally i don't give paid sick days, i do try to give about 10 days paid/ year. Since I don't have real full time CPs it's never been a big issue.

                            I try to not rely upon friends and family for the day to day living stuff because it can get complicated. If such are around and don't mind helping in an emergency then for most things ok. I don't think I'd ask my kids for bowel care or dressing though. thankfully I've never had too.

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