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    physiatrist/sci physician

    [img]/forum/images/smilies/redface.gif[/img] perhaps a stupid question but is there a difference? [img]/forum/images/smilies/confused.gif[/img]
    "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

    #2
    A physiatrist is a doctor of 'Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation'; so yes, a physiatrist and 'SCI doc' are the same. The 'good' physiatrist will coordinate care between any specialists or family docs, with relation to SCI and body functions; give advice re rehab/function issues, as well as equipment prescriptions; sometimes physiatrists handle neuropathic pain problems; spasticity problems; and do a general 'check up' once a year on all SCI issues.

    Wise did a beautiful description of the different types of docs we may encounter along our SCI 'journey', and I couldn't find it in a search; maybe someone with a little more know-how searchwise, can find it and refer you to it.

    _____________
    If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other. - Mother Teresa
    _____________

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      #3
      would think they are different ,
      i have a physiatrist, a pain management. a urologist , and now a orthopedic for a foot injury. plus a podiatrist that i also tried, but treatment didnt work as well as i hoped, for this injury ,

      my biggest problem is none of them talk to one another, the physiatrist gives me the best info though, and is much more in tune with the problems i have now with a injury to the foot, that also is my foot drop , impaired function foot and lower leg. and of course where all my neuropathic pain is.
      cauda equina

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        #4
        [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img] TY. I feel much better now. A new physician with the physiatrist title came to the rehab. hospital when my son was inpatient. I didn't notice the other physicians being titled as such but my son's doc does all the things you listed.
        Granted he is a bit old school but he is open to anything we think of, want or need otherwise and I appreciate that very much. I wondered if this title carried something more with it that would benefit my son being a patient of otherwise.
        "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

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          #5
          Metro, they would have no need to talk with one another unless there was a situation which intertwined for them all.

          _____________
          If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other. - Mother Teresa
          _____________

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Marmalady:

            Metro, they would have no need to talk with one another unless there was a situation which intertwined for them all.
            in my case i have a situation that has been going on for 4 months, and i wish they would have talked, the physiatitrist specialized in back and neck, the orthopedist i went to due to a foot injury..the foot injury was and is compounded by my lack of calf muscle functions/dropfoot, toes not moving and getting impacted on a fall. the physiatrist recommends i see another orthopedist, however i good one takes another 6 weeks to get an appointment.
            i decided to go to the VA hospital, i think there is more of a chance of having a group of doctors all familiar with sci problems talking to each other and recommending treatment.
            i guess if you dont have a problem its ok, but once you develop problems that go out of their speciality its maddening [img]/forum/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif[/img]
            cauda equina

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              #7
              Metron~ I agree with you. My thoughts are that if it has something to do with something that has to do with the sci, then my son should be going to the physician that specializes with this first, not anyone else...THEN that Doc can refer him elsewhere and keep in constant contact. Figuring out the kids problem with his knee/hamstring has been quite the experience, felt for the most part that not one of them in any field really had the answer or even a good guess, except the X-rays were fine and the blood tests alright, I am the one who asked that someone check out the leg braces and after reading up and reading what all had to say around here...happy to say it has been better and better through some home pt and extra attention, still wonder what it was/is though. [img]/forum/images/smilies/confused.gif[/img]
              "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

              Comment


                #8
                in my last reply I meant it in this way:
                I agree that all of these other types of physicians/specialists should be familiar with sci when referred too.
                I cannot find a "general" physician within the clinic who they can tell me has some experience/background working with sci patients. I really don't want my son seeing someone not familiar even somewhat, with sci as his primary physician, etc.
                "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

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                  #9
                  I don't have a physiatrist, just my family Dr. No-one at the Rehab I was in ever said anything about it. See with not finding my burst fracture for almost 2 months, I'm not sure they even realize I have SCI Do I need one?
                  Thank's
                  Duge

                  T-12 incomplete 10-3-02

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Duge, it's always a good idea to be checked out by a physiatrist who is knowledgeable in SCI medicine. I would check the 'Doctors and Clinics' forum in the 'Exchange' section; I'd also post a question in Care to see if anyone in your area knows of a good physiatrist.


                    Teesie - Most 'general' docs don't have any training in dealing with SCI problems - that is the area of the physiatrist; the physiatrist may coordinate care - ie, refer specific bladder care to a urologist, and make recommendations to them as to treatment, etc.

                    _____________
                    If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other. - Mother Teresa
                    _____________

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Yep, I realize this Marmalday, I only wish it were different...some experience with sci patients or background/interest otherwise would be a benefit if one could find as such, in this clinic I haven't. But then I thought, now why the heck aren't I asking my friends with an sci who they go to as a primary ~ tah dah! What can I say, sometimes it takes me awhile... [img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img] [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]
                      "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        A physiatrist is a physician who has specialized residency training and board accreditation in physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). While all physiatrist will have some training in SCI, not all specialize in this or keep up to date. There are physiatrists who specialize in pediatrics or pain rehabilitation or brain injury or stroke for example, who may be fairly out of date on SCI care. Some may only do physical medicine (EMGs for example) or may do sports medicine or occupational health.

                        You may also run into physicians (physiatrists, urologists, neurologists, etc.) who have a board certification already in their own specialty, but who have also achieved board certification in Spinal Cord Medicine. This is a fairly new board certification, and requires additional experience and training (and knowledge) about SCI as well as a special written and oral exam. If you are looking for a physician who really knows SCI, I would lean toward a physiatrist who is also subspecialty boarded in SCI Medicine.

                        You can get some more information about this at this site:

                        http://www.aapmr.org/condtreat/what.htm

                        http://www.abpmr.org/certification/subspecialty.html

                        For a small fee, you can find a list of physicians in your area with additional quality information as well here:

                        Healthgrades.com

                        (KLD)
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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