Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ever sit in the chair?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    One night I made our entire dinner from my husband's chair while he was sitting at his desk on the computer. I did it to get a better perspective on where he's stuck everyday. I have to say it was very difficult for me being at that totally different place since I'm very tall. Plus my arms hurt for two days, that's a workout!

    I think it's a good thing for people close to you to "roll a mile in your chair". It helped me alot in realizing what he goes through being stuck there ALL THE TIME.
    Do not live your life in fear of your own government because the moment that you do, is the moment they rule you.

    Me

    Comment


    • #32
      I'd be afraid my chair would be wrecked!! Wrecking a $12,000 or more power chair someone relies on for their livelyhood would stress me out.

      I let someone "professional" move my adapted van which is thousands of dollars and here I sit, four weeks later, with a pending neglegance lawsuit, and a van "still" getting fixed.

      A manual chair, (maybe), but a power chair (no way!) I can't afford to "play around" with my independence.

      "I guess pain is a great motivator."- Yanni

      Comment


      • #33
        My husban was admitted to the hospital from the ER, and I had to take his permobil up to the 10th floor to where he was. I could not get off the elevater!! It is harder to drive than what you think it would be. Especially when you watch him drive it with perfection.

        Comment


        • #34
          Beckyb- your post made me laugh. I can totally see myself in that situation and not being able to move the chair without running into everything. I would be terrified to drive it on an elevator. My husband's chair is hard enough for me to get loaded into the van (like when we go to a relative's house with no accessible entrance and someoen carries him in, I will put the power chair back in the van to keep it secure and dry- there have been a few times I knew the chair and I both were going to hit the ground.

          Diamond Downs- Once when my husbands power chair was out of commission and he was in his push chair for a few days (complete, higher level quad with limited hand and arm function), he was complaining and constantly wanting his shoulders rubbed. After he got into bed, then I used the push chair for everything I had to do the rest of the night. Put a new perspective on a lot of things. I know if we ever build a house that there will be alot of things that I will think to modify to make his life easier.

          Comment


          • #35
            If I am not in my chair, one of my two teenage sons is in it popping wheelies and doing daredevil tricks in it. It makes me crazy, but we all get a good laugh out of it.

            Comment


            • #36
              I have had the same thing happen, not exactly this way but close. My friend liked it when we played around in his chair, he always told me to sit in it and try it out and his brother was always trying to learn how to pop up. I was kind of hesitant to get in and try it. I did it first in the morning when he was in the shower just to see what it felt like before I actually did it with him watching(shyness). The first time I was going around in the kitched and tried to back it back in like it was when i got in it beside the bed. I couldnt do it. I tried and tried and finally had to get out and put it back. Not so good. I did not have a dream that night or even within the next week. This has been 2 months ago and a few nights ago I had a dream that I was in a chair. It was not a scary dream but one that opened my eyes. During the dream I did stuff that I know most people dont do in chairs, I easily got out of the chair by sliding and eventually in the end of my dream I stood up and walked. My friend on the other hand did not. When I woke up right after this I was sweating and wanted to cry. That was my dream.

              Comment


              • #37
                My 3 boys play around in my chair whenever I'm not in it!! I don't so much mind them playing in it as I do the fact that they move it out of my reach when I am ready to get back into it!!

                But what annoys me to all ends is when I'm sitting in my chair doing something and someone walks up behind me and moves my chair!!! I feel like my personal space is being invaded!! They would never move a normal chair with an AB in it, but they feel since your chair rolls they have the right to move it!! AAAAARRRGGGHHHHH!!!
                Tina
                C5-C7 Walking Quad - Very Incomplete
                Aug '03

                Comment


                • #38
                  Guess I"m a little late on this topic, but it amused me to read the responses, so I"m chiming in now. I have sat in and used my partner's wheelchair - sometimes it's necessary, especially if she's in the hospital. We realized it was essential for me to be able to learn how to drive her Jazzy so if I had to I wouldn't wreck it. She doesn't have a problem with me in it, but while others are invited to just sit in it if we need an extra chair at home, they are cordially uninvited to actually use it. As someone said, those things cost a FORTUNE! She gets very twitchy if her chair is moved away from her when she's in the hospital - as she says, that chair is her legs and how would they like it if someone moved took their legs away?

                  I remember, many years ago, when she had a scooter in addition to her wheelchair. She'd rarely used it - turned out to be more of a hassle than a help. One day we were supposed to go to an arts and craft show down the street from our house. She was very tired and decided to stay home and sleep, but didn't want me to miss it and told me to go and let me use the scooter. Now I definitely did NOT go to this fair intending to pretend to be disabled, nor did I, but I found out very quickly that people were making that assumption cause I was in the scooter. At first I was embarrassed feeling like I"d played a trick without meaning to when folks started scrambling to help me. I didn't know what to say. Eventually I decided it was giving me a unique perspective on what life is like for my partner. Some people look away, some bash you in the head with their purses or bags, some go overboard to be helpful and kind. Yeah, it was only for an hour or so, but every little bit of insight I can gain into what my partner deals with 24/7 helps me know more about what life in a chair is like.

                  Interesting topic.
                  Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
                  - Albert Einstein

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Some interesting replies here.. thanks for giving me some insight. I still haven't sat in the chair. [img]/forum/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif[/img] But, I plan to one of these days... I bet I wreck it first thing (and it's a manual chair)... [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]
                    AB, Husband is c5-6 inc quad, 25 years post injury.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      nicci, i have sat in his chair a few times, it still feels very odd to me. i dont make a big deal of it, i just do it.

                      what i did do though was when we were at the medical supply place i got into a demo chair and fooled around, wow i never realized wheelies were so hard!

                      ****MORE OHIO CC RAGE INFO COMING SOON!****

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Don't do it! I was always leary to use others' crutches and etc throughout my life so naturally sitting in someone's wheelchair wasn't something I wanted to do. When I was in college I did landscaping and of everything I'd ever done in life I felt it was my calling. I could be my own boss, express my creativity, work outside, see my accomplishments at the end of each day.... I could go on, and on, but back to the subject. I took a job for an older gentleman who was confined to a wheelchair. I not only did the original job, but sort of became his handyman as I liked him and he liked my work-ethic and my cost, as I always charged him little. Anyway, even though his wife disliked it, he loved to be in his truck and ride through his fields which were now tended by his neighbor. I'd pick him up, put him in the seat and away he'd go. He used an old cane to push the accelerator and brake, but truly only idled around. One day it began pouring rain and he idled up to a stop near the barn, which was far from his powerchair. I thought little of it and began driving it over to the truck by walking beside it and using the control. He rolled down the window and basically barked at me to sit in it, put it in high gear and to hurry or his seat would be soaked. I didn't want to sit in the damn thing, but I didn't want his seat and etc being wet either so I did. I'll never forget the feeling that went through my body immediately upon sitting in that chair. Afterwards he reminded me, as he often did, how I should appreciate my legs because there was nothing like them, etc, etc. That was on a Friday afternoon around 3. I drove home that night, and had my accident Sunday at around 3. I've been in a chair every since. That old man, Mr Dewit, traveled with his wife the 6 hrs to visit me and could hardly even talk to me through his tears. I still think of the feeling I had when I sat in his chair.

                        Tim
                        "Don't Die Wondering" _ Alicia Molik

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          If I were an actor, I don't think I could lie in a casket. I dont care how big the paycheck. There must be a connection in this phobia somehow. Its a situation you don't want. Your options have a way of limiting themselves. Otherwise, I can't see either wheelchairs or caskets being big sellers.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            We used to let our kids drive the chair around all over the place. We were younger then! Our grandkids wheel around in the manual chair and have gone so far as to duck tape their fingers together and their legs as well to see what it feels like to be like their Bacca (grandpa). I don't know if that is healthy play or not [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img] On the positive side they are not intimidated or shy around other people in chairs because according to their world view it's just another kind of normal.

                            "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made of us."~~Sartre
                            "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made of us."~~Sartre

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              {{{{{BUMP}}}}}

                              Found this old thread and thought it would be interesting to give it another life for the newer members in case someone wanted to add their 2 cents. . We've discussed it all here haven't we !! This was a good discussion.

                              Obieone
                              ~ Be the change you wish to see in the world ~ Mahatma Gandi


                              " calling all Angels ...... calling all Angels ....walk me through this one .. don't leave me alone .... calling all Angels .... calling all Angels .... we're tryin' and we're hopin' cause we're not sure how ....... this .... goes ..."
                              Jane Siberry

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                An interesting subject that I never thought about, thanks, Obieone.
                                I sit in my wife's chair every evening, as we read to one another while doing her BP. I don't think anything of it, except that it's also a good way to keep a check on the Roho's inflation. Sitting in it is by far the easiest way to move it around the house when she's not in it.
                                It's a tool, nothing more.
                                - Richard

                                addendum:
                                When I was small in the early '50s, my mother had polio. I don't remember being actively discouraged from sitting her wheelchair, but I do have this vague memory of something akin to fear about being in that chair. I don't think we ever tried to sit in it.
                                Last edited by rfbdorf; 01-04-2009, 01:24 PM. Reason: added after reading hlh's post below

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X