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What can aides legally do? (MD in my case.)

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  • What can aides legally do? (MD in my case.)

    Last night, the local news had a report on home health care, and what they can and can't do legally. Unfortunately, I could only watch part, as my aide was coming into my room for night care, and I didn't want her to see, in case she's doing something she shouldn't be legally.

    One thing that I did hear was caring for colostomies has to be done by a CNA or above.

    The web site is wbaltv.com. Click on I-Team to find the report. Also, I would check in your location for what is legal, though I know we need things done (bowel care, cathing for those who need it, care of suprapubics, Mitrofanoffs, colostomies, range of motion, wound care on early wounds to try to prevent them from getting to the point of needing wound care nurses, etc.)

    I will need at least one aide soon, to replace one of the evening aides (I get three hours in the afternoon weekdays, and 44 hours a week used for evenings from Jewish Community Services - they know about each other. I really need more care - thanks to upper back pains, shoulder blade issues, and balance problems, which have limited my function, and continue to further limit them as time goes on and the issues worsen, I was never able to be as independent as I wanted to be - I admit I don't have the driving personality to be as independent as some C-5s here are, but I wanted to take care of myself to the extent of my ability, and my ability never was C-5 due to the other issues, no matter how hard I tried. I hate being dependent, and unable to be as independent as I could be at my level. It's depressing, on top of the pains, financial worries, and worries about my Mom, as you all know or can imagine if you're independent.

    Thanks,
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  • #2
    If it isn't trouble, could some quads of C-5 or above post their list of job requirements for aides here? I might as well take advantage of the experience here when I continue to update mine.

    Thank you,
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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    • #3
      I'm in Canada, and get my workers through an agency, so it'll be different.

      Mine do:
      IC and bowls, track lift transfers.. No manual lifting, and pretty much what I ask. I'm givin some slack in my care plan as the office trusts my judgement and common sense, SUCKERSS!

      They CAN'T do dressings... Even bandaids technically, nail triming, windows, I kid you not, and BBQs.

      However, EVERYTHING they do has to be okayed/taught by a Registered Nurse andd/or Theropist.

      At C5 I get 27hrs a week with 3 visits a day

      Comment


      • #4
        Are you private hiring or hiring through an agency? This makes a BIG difference.

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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        • #5
          Private hiring, one aide paid by county, other by a religious family service organization.

          I really need more care, but can't find how to get it.
          Alan

          Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

          Comment


          • #6
            In most states, if your hire a PCA privately, they don't even need to be a CNA or HHA. You can hire anyone who is willing to learn to do the work, and who is dependable and shows up. It is the agency or state licensure boards that limit what they are allowed to do.

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you for that.

              I am trying to find a way to get more funding for a few more hours.
              Alan

              Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'v been trying to make a list of duties, but I need almost everything done for me (so embarassing to say, on a site where so many live independently or nearly so, but that's my reality, thanks to pain, scapula problems, and a relatively inaccessible house.) What a fiasco.
                Alan

                Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Alan, this is a stretch, but have you considered contacting local TV/Newspapers with your plight? This is a much bigger story than just yourself
                  and the media would definitely want to be involved if it meant bringing caregivers and those in need together.

                  From a purely PR standpoint, this is gold.
                  And the truth shall set you free.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My morning person has told me she can't do anything she isn't licensed for, including bowel care, and she isn't licensed for much. With what the County pays, I'm not going to get CNAs.
                    Alan

                    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm still not getting very far.
                      Alan

                      Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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                      • #12
                        After my last surgery, my Mom, who was my caretaker at the time, had to go to classes to get training to do certain things like dressing changes, diaper changes, pressure sore checking, ect. After she completed several classes, she got certified and was able to do all of this. She get's paid through the state and comes over in the morning and at night. After surgery, I wasn't able to move around easily, due to the incision spot on my abdomen, so after I was discharged from the nursing home I recovered at for a little bit after surgery, Mom took over the caretaking stuff. She basically changed diapers, emptied my ostomy appliance (while I was learning to do all that ostomy stuff), got me dressed, and did chores like washing dishes and washing clothes. Mom also would fill up several water bottles in the morning, so I'd remember to drink enough during the day.

                        There are several agnecies that might be able to help you. When I was in the nursing home, they had a state worker interview me and ask what I could do and couldn't do on my own, so she'd know what type of caretaker to assign. Eventually, she asked Mom if she'd like to do it if she took the necessary classes for it.

                        Jessie

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