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  • Easystand help bowel routine?

    Hi
    Does anyone know if the regular use of Easystand help with bowel routine problems? i.e. slugish or comsipation and such.

    Brian

  • #2
    I would say YES it helps or helped me anyway. It is still a bowel program but cut the reading time in half. I have just started with KAFO's and it seems to have made it even faster.

    Be warned it takes days if not a few weeks for the ol'pipes to get adjusted. So be ready when the demon comes knockin. Hope this helps and hope you get one soon.

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    • #3
      Thanks I'm looking into Easystand and welcome thoughts on it helping my bowel routine.

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      • #4
        regular standing definately helps w/ bowelsd

        "Man is bound to follow the adventurous promptings of his scientific and inventive mind and to admire himself for his splendid achievements" Carl Jung
        Bike-on.com rep
        John@bike-on.com
        c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
        sponsored handcycle racer

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        • #5
          Good question.
          Equipment reps suggest that regular use of a standing position with products like Easystand promote better bowel elimination by increasing circulation, reducing skin pressure, promoting gravity,etc. To date, however, there are no studies that
          validate this and so it becomes a personal choice. If you have the equipment available and there is not a lot of cost involved, you may want to try it. Like everything else, there is so much equipment out there that costs money and works for some and not for others.

          Do others have any personal experience with this?

          AAD
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse:

            Good question.
            Equipment reps suggest that regular use of a standing position with products like Easystand promote better bowel elimination by increasing circulation, reducing skin pressure, promoting gravity,etc. To date, however, there are no studies that
            validate this and so it becomes a personal choice. If you have the equipment available and there is not a lot of cost involved, you may want to try it. Like everything else, there is so much equipment out there that costs money and works for some and not for others.

            Do others have any personal experience with this?

            AAD
            aad, i really do believe its a huge help w/ bowels.......i have always stood since soon after my accident. when i go on vacation or something and cant stand i get bound up.....

            every sci should stand , it has huge benefits for your body

            "Man is bound to follow the adventurous promptings of his scientific and inventive mind and to admire himself for his splendid achievements" Carl Jung
            Bike-on.com rep
            John@bike-on.com
            c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
            sponsored handcycle racer

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            • #7
              Agreed with fuentejps about standing and its benefits.

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              • #8
                I have the Easystand 6000. I stand 30-60 minutes every day. I didn't get it until 2 years after my injury and it hasn't made any change with my BP.

                _____
                Learn from the mistakes of others, you won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.
                Learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jimnms:

                  I have the Easystand 6000. I stand 30-60 minutes every day. I didn't get it until 2 years after my injury and it hasn't made any change with my BP.

                  _____
                  Learn from the mistakes of others, you won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.
                  just out of curiosity, have u ever went a week w/out standing jim

                  "Man is bound to follow the adventurous promptings of his scientific and inventive mind and to admire himself for his splendid achievements" Carl Jung
                  Bike-on.com rep
                  John@bike-on.com
                  c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
                  sponsored handcycle racer

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fuentejps:

                    just out of curiosity, have u ever went a week w/out standing jim
                    Yes, I didn't stand while in DC, or for several days after while I recovered.

                    _____
                    Learn from the mistakes of others, you won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.
                    Learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree with AAD. There are very few studies that validate the effects of standing on bowel function and other health effects. I did a quick literature search and found the following papers and found some case reports.

                      Shields & Dudley-Javoroski (2005) described a device that logged the amount of time that a person with T10 complete paraplegia stood. He stood for short periods (average about 12 minutes) 3-4 days a week and reported improved spasticity and bowel motility.

                      Hoenig, et al. (2001) described a case of a 61-year old patient with a T12-L1 ASIA B paraplegia who was injured in 1965. The patient was on long term chronic narcotics and had impactions. They found that the standing significantly increased the frequency of bowel movements and a decrease in the bowel care time with the use of a standing table 5 times/week.

                      Eng, et al. (2001) surveyed perceived effects of prolonged standing on 152 adults with spinal cord injury. Of 126 people who responded and had sufficiently severe spinal cord injury with significant compromise of function, 38 said that they engaged in prolonged standing (average 40 minutes per session, 3-4 times a week). They reported improved feelings of well-being, circulation, skin integrity, reflex activity, bowel and bladder function, digestion, sleep, pain, and fatigue. Of course, these represent people who presumably are standing because they think that it helps them.

                      Walter, et al. (1999) described 99 patients who stood 30 minutes or longer each day. They reported improved quality of life, fewer bed scores, fewer bladder infections, improved bowel regularity, and improved ability to straighten their legs compared to those who stood less. An earlier study by the same group (Dunn, et al., 1998) studied people with spinal cord injury who had bought a standing device from one of two manufacturers. They found that 84% were using the devices, less than 10% had side effects from thes tanding, 21% reported being able to empty their bladders more completely. Some felt that it improved bowel regularity, reduced urinary tract infections, improved their leg spasticity, and prevented bed sores. Most (79%) recommended the devices to others.





                      REFERENCES

                      Shields RK and Dudley-Javoroski S (2005). Monitoring standing wheelchair use after spinal cord injury: a case report. Disabil Rehabil 27: 142-6. PURPOSE: An important issue in spinal cord injury (SCI) research is whether standing can yield positive health benefits. However, quantifying dose of standing and establishing subject compliance with a standing protocol is difficult. This case report describes a method to monitor dose of standing outside the laboratory, describes the standing patterns of one subject, and describes this subject's satisfaction with the standing protocol. METHOD: A man with T-10 complete paraplegia agreed to have his commercially available standing wheelchair instrumented with a custom-designed logging device for a 2-year period. The micro-controller-based logger, under custom software control, was mounted to the standing wheelchair. The logger recorded date, duration, angle of standing, and start/stop times. RESULTS: The client exceeded a suggested minimum dosage of standing per month (130.4% of goal), choosing to stand for short bouts (mean = 11.57 min) at an average angle of 61 degrees, on an average 3.86 days per calendar week. He was generally very satisfied with the standing device and provided subjective reports of improved spasticity and bowel motility. CONCLUSION: This case report describes a standing and surveillance system that allow quantification of standing dose. Future controlled studies are needed to evaluate whether standing can be beneficially affect secondary complications after SCI. Graduate Program in Physical Therapy and Physical Rehabilitation Science, Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. richard-shields@uiowa.edu http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15823996

                      Hoenig H, Murphy T, Galbraith J and Zolkewitz M (2001). Case study to evaluate a standing table for managing constipation. SCI Nurs 18: 74-7. Standing devices have been advocated as a potentially beneficial treatment for constipation in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI); however, definitive data are lacking. A case of a patient who requested a standing table to treat chronic constipation is presented as an illustration of a method to address this problem on an individual patient level. The patient was a 62-year-old male with T12-L1 ASIA B paraplegia who was injured in 1965. The patient was on chronic narcotics for severe, nonoperable shoulder pain. His bowel program had been inadequate to prevent impactions. A systematic approach was used to measure the effects of a standing table on frequency of bowel movements (BMs) and on length of bowel care episodes. There was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in frequency of BMs and a decrease in bowel care time with the use of the standing table 5 times/week versus baseline. For this patient, the use of the standing table was a clinically useful addition to his bowel care program. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=12035465

                      Eng JJ, Levins SM, Townson AF, Mah-Jones D, Bremner J and Huston G (2001). Use of prolonged standing for individuals with spinal cord injuries. Phys Ther 81: 1392-9. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Prolonged standing in people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) has the potential to affect a number of health-related areas such as reflex activity, joint range of motion, or well-being. The purpose of this study was to document the patterns of use of prolonged standing and their perceived effects in subjects with SCIs. SUBJECTS: The subjects were 152 adults with SCIs (103 male, 49 female; mean age=34 years, SD=8, range=18-55) who returned mailed survey questionnaires. METHODS: A 17-item self-report survey questionnaire was sent to the 463 members of a provincial spinal cord support organization. RESULTS: Survey responses for 26 of the 152 respondents were eliminated from the analysis because they had minimal effects from their injuries and did not need prolonged standing as an extra activity. Of the 126 remaining respondents, 38 respondents (30%) reported that they engaged in prolonged standing for an average of 40 minutes per session, 3 to 4 times a week, as a method to improve or maintain their health. The perceived benefits included improvements in several health-related areas such as well-being, circulation, skin integrity, reflex activity, bowel and bladder function, digestion, sleep, pain, and fatigue. The most common reason that prevented the respondents from standing was the cost of equipment to enable standing. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Considering the many reported benefits of standing, this activity may be useful for people with SCI. This study identified a number of body systems and functions that may need to be investigated if clinical trials of prolonged standing in people with SCI are undertaken. School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of British Columbia, T325-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2B5.janicee@interchange.ubc.ca http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=11509069

                      Walter JS, Sola PG, Sacks J, Lucero Y, Langbein E and Weaver F (1999). Indications for a home standing program for individuals with spinal cord injury. J Spinal Cord Med 22: 152-8. Additional analyses were conducted on a recently published survey of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) who used standing mobility devices. Frequency and duration of standing were examined in relation to outcomes using chi square analyses. Respondents (n = 99) who stood 30 minutes or more per day had significantly improved quality of life, fewer bed sores, fewer bladder infections, improved bowel regularity, and improved ability to straighten their legs compared with those who stood less time. Compliance with regular home standing (at least once per week) was high (74%). The data also suggest that individuals with SCI could benefit from standing even if they were to begin several years after injury. The observation of patient benefits and high compliance rates suggest that mobile standing devices should be more strongly considered as a major intervention for relief from secondary medical complications and improvement in overall quality of life of individuals with SCI. Edward Hines Jr. Veterans Affairs Hospital Research Service (151L), Hines, IL 60141, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=10685379

                      Dunn RB, Walter JS, Lucero Y, Weaver F, Langbein E, Fehr L, Johnson P and Riedy L (1998). Follow-up assessment of standing mobility device users. Assist Technol 10: 84-93. The use of standing devices by spinal cord-injured subjects was investigated through a national survey of a sample of individuals who returned their manufacturer's warranty card to two companies. We obtained a 32% response rate (99/310). The majority of respondents were male (87%) with a median age between 41 and 50 years. Seventy-seven percent were paraplegic and 21% were quadriplegic. Forty percent had between 1 and 5 years experience with their device, and 84% of those responding were currently using their standing device. Forty-one percent used their standing device one to six times a week; two-thirds stood between 30 minutes and 1 hour for each use. Less than 10% of subjects experienced any side effects, such as nausea or headaches, from standing. Twenty-one percent of subjects reported being able to empty their bladder more completely. There was also a favorable response by some individuals on the effects of the standing devices on bowel regularity, reduction of urinary tract infections, leg spasticity, and number of bed sores. Finally, 79% of subjects highly recommended use of standing devices to other people with spinal cord injury. The positive responses of individuals using standing devices is a strong recommendation for the assistive technology community to make these devices more available to individuals with spinal cord injury. Rehabilitation Research & Development Center, Edward Hines Jr. Veterans Affairs Hospital, Illinois 60141, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=10339284

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                      • #12
                        that literature is very promising....i dont see how standing couldnt help, it just makes sense...

                        "Man is bound to follow the adventurous promptings of his scientific and inventive mind and to admire himself for his splendid achievements" Carl Jung
                        Bike-on.com rep
                        John@bike-on.com
                        c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
                        sponsored handcycle racer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the great study information Dr. Young.

                          AAD
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have an EasyStand standing frame in which I stand nearly everyday for approximately an hour. My bowel routine is daily. I don't know if that can be attributed to the standing frame, but my back side sure appreciates the one hour daily break.

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                            • #15
                              I had bad hemmriods ., used to stand more than hour.

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