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Recipes for avoiding UTI's

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  • #31
    folley ?agrrr...i almost died ....AD and bleeding .

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Mona~on~wheels
      So use dermacyn to clean around stoma of suprapubic catheter daily?
      Hi Mona, no, I dont use any catheter (supra or intermitent). I use Dermacyn to clean the area around the urethra after I go to the loo.

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      • #33
        Oh okay I understand.

        Would it be good to use around my suprapubic stoma too?
        Like for daily cleaning?
        sigpic

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        • #34
          mona, did you have a foley before you had a suprapubic? did they close the urethral opening when they put the suprapubic?

          thank you!
          "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing" ~ edmund burker

          c4-5 quad

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          • #35
            So <cough cough>

            MODS.

            Can you please sticky? It's useful.
            And the truth shall set you free.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Mona~on~wheels
              Oh okay I understand.

              Would it be good to use around my suprapubic stoma too?
              Like for daily cleaning?
              I dont see why not. It is exactly like water, but it kills even MRSA.

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              • #37
                I wear a leg bag and "spit and slip" after BP in the morning. On my yearly I show up dirty and take 20 days two times a day of Cipro 500 mg. I doing great!

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                • #38
                  Found these on a related web site:
                  • Drink plenty of liquids, especially water. Cranberry juice may have infection-fighting properties.
                  • Urinate frequently, and avoid retaining your urine for a long time after you feel the urge to void.
                  • Wipe from front to back after a bowel movement to prevent bacteria in the anal region from spreading to the vagina and urethra.
                  • Take showers rather than bubble baths.
                  • Wash the skin around the vagina and anus daily.
                  • Empty your bladder as soon as possible after intercourse, and drink a full glass of water to help flush bacteria.
                  • Avoid using deodorant sprays or feminine products such as douches in the genital area that could irritate the urethra.
                  • Wear cotton underwear
                  • If you are sexually active, make sure you wash your genital area and urinate after intercourse. This will help to remove any bacteria that could travel up the urethra.
                  Disability & Mobility Information Directory
                  Complimentary Therapy Directory
                  DDA Disability Access Audits

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                  • #39
                    I have a recurring UTI and a fellow gimp told me that he had a problem with not being able to empty out his bladder completely. He had a urodynamics done and he found out that when he cathed he would not empty out completely so there would always be some urine in the bladder.

                    I self cath and I had a urodynamics done in the hospital about a year ago. I read the report and I don't know what it is suppose to say if that is what is wrong with me. I think I might have the same problem. Right before I begin my bowel (dig stim) I cath and then I start digging. I found that when I am leaning over to do the stim as soon as I sit up straight I shoot out pee, even after I had just cathed.

                    Anyone have the same condition?

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                    • #40
                      Do you always Crede well before removing the catheter? This will help to get the last drops out, and is the only time we recommend using the Crede manuever anymore.

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                        Do you always Crede well before removing the catheter? This will help to get the last drops out, and is the only time we recommend using the Crede manuever anymore.

                        (KLD)
                        Dear nurse, why is Crede not recommended anymore?
                        While I was in the Hospital (11 years ago), I was taught I should do this.

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                        • #42
                          We have known that this is a potentially dangerous practice for some time. Unless you have a sphincter that has no tone or one that you can voluntarily open, when performing the Crede maneuver you risk damaging the ureteroviscular valves that prevent reflux of urine from the bladder up to the kidneys, and the pressures exerted against a closed sphincter can easily cause reflux of potentially colonized urine along this route. For the same reasons, for those with bladder tone and spasm, "triggering" or "tapping" to stimulate bladder contraction and reflex voiding is no longer recommended.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                            We have known that this is a potentially dangerous practice for some time. Unless you have a sphincter that has no tone or one that you can voluntarily open, when performing the Crede maneuver you risk damaging the ureteroviscular valves that prevent reflux of urine from the bladder up to the kidneys, and the pressures exerted against a closed sphincter can easily cause reflux of potentially colonized urine along this route. For the same reasons, for those with bladder tone and spasm, "triggering" or "tapping" to stimulate bladder contraction and reflex voiding is no longer recommended.

                            (KLD)
                            Thank you, i'll keep it in mind.

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                            • #44
                              Is the Crede Maneuver = pushing with abdominal muscles to make myself pee? Like before SCI when we used to have contest to see who could pee the farthest? This question sounds silly but I am seriously asking. I read about Crede but it has never been explained to me. I am an L1 complete para almost 2 years post. I can make myself pee but can't stop myself from peeing. I wear a condom catheter and leg bag / bed bag. 24/7. Just wondering.
                              L1 Complete - Injury 3/12/06 - Grateful to be alive!!!!

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                              • #45
                                Pushing with your abdominal muscles or diaphram (valsalva) is called straining. While it is different from the Crede maneuver (pushing with a hand or fist just above the pubic bone into the bladder) it is also now recommended to be avoided for those with neurogenic bladders. Long term use of external condom catheters and either reflex voiding or straining is also rarely recommended anymore.

                                (KLD)
                                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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