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    Instilling bladder medicine directly into bladder?

    I have read on here that some put the bladder medicine directly into the bladder rather than taking it orally. Can this be done with any of the bladder meds; oxybutynin, Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Detrol & Detrol LA? If so how much (dosage), how often and for how long can you do it this way? Also what I understand is that you crush it up and put it in a syringe with saline water & then put it in the bladder.

    #2
    Sandra - If you are considering this possibility, I suggest that you discuss this with your urologist. CRF
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      I'm going to see my urologist this Wednesday and plan on asking him about this and would like to have some info for him. I was wondering from anybody that does this exactly what thy do, how much (dosage), how often and for how long can you do it this way & can it be any of the medicines I listed above? Also what I understand is that you crush it up and put it in a syringe with saline water & then put it in the bladder. But as I read my medicine (Ditropan XL) it states not to crush or chew, so what does that mean?

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        #4
        Only regular Ditropan can be used this way. It would not work with XL, which should not be crushed or dissolved. Generally the Ditropan solution is instilled into the bladder following catheterization 2-3X daily. It cannot be used for those who take Ditropan and use an indwelling catheter or urinate into an external condom catheter...only those who do intermittent cath.

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

        Comment


          #5
          I'd like to know about instilling antibiotics directly into the bladder. I mean I get these horrible symptoms just like an AB, serious pain, burning, urgency, low fever sometimes and my primary care doc no longer wants to treat them because my last UTI was resistant to all oral meds and I had to do 6 days of IV meds. If I catch it before it's systemic or fever hits above say 99.5 would this work? Has anyone here done this? How did it work? Do you wait for a UA, culture and sensitivity like with regular medical protocols for UTIs? Yes, I'll be speaking to my urologist next week but want some info up front. I normally do CIC and use a new cath each time now but sometimes have to use a foley for travel, etc.

          Thanks for any help. I am also no longer on any prophylactic antibiotics or anti-infectives. Just trying d-Mannose.

          Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."
          Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

          Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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            #6
            bump-HELP

            Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."
            Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

            Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

            Comment


              #7
              Sue, generally antibiotics directly into the bladdder are not very effective. Unless you have significant reflux, they will not help with pockets of infection in the ureters or kidney (common). In addition, many antibiotics must pass through your blood stream and kidney first and be metabolized by your body before they help with infections. Years ago I remember instilling neosporin solution at the end of intermittent catheterizations. It was a mess to do, expensive, and did not result in any lower rate of UTIs, so we stopped doing it. I don't think anyone does this anymore at a reputable center.

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks KLD. My urologist's RN did now of anyone doing it either but is checking anyway. I just don't get the problem. I have wonderful pressures, cath often, use new catheters and a light mix of Hibiclens because betadine and I do not get along and drink what I'm supposed to and still I get them. No stones, no signs of kidney problems, grrrrrrrrr. I guess I spend the rest of my life with crossed legs, huh?
                Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                Comment

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