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    Do we live to be older...

    ... when injured earlier? Or just live longer past our injury? Or am I getting it backwards completely?

    Thanks.

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~
    ~See you at the CareCure-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

    #2
    There are charts that list life expectantices for SCI based on age and level of injurgy. Search UAB website for this chart.

    JJG
    Jake's Pop

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks, Dr. J.J.

      We live longer past the injury when injured earlier. But our expected age at death is lower when injured earlier.

      Dang. I was trying to look for at least one positive from having been injured so young. Guess this one ain't it!

      I need to be healthy for forty more years. But my life expectancy is only another sixteen! Wow! Never really paid attention until now. Guess I'm gonna have to skew the numbers with a whopping long life!

      BTW, if a cure changes my status from "low quad" to "incomplete motor" my life expectancy will go up. C'mon cure!

      http://www.spinalcord.uab.edu/show.a...0&return=21795

      ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~
      ~See you at the CareCure-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

      Comment


        #4
        There is so much information hidden in data like these. I wish my degree was more generically social science because I would love to run a study to update survival statistics for the SCI population. I can think of loads of other variables to ask about...presence or absence of 24/7 caregivers...depression...locus of control (do you feel like you control your life, or does your injury status control your life?)...socioeconomic status...education level...income level before injury...physical condition prior and post injury...etc. I'm sure even a cursory review of the literature would suggest a few more.

        I would hypothesize at the least that people who feel that they still control their lives, have sufficent access to caregiving, and are able to work could beat the listed averages easily. People who feel out of control, have difficulties getting care, and cannot work are probably at higher risk to have a shorter life span. If this hypothesis were supported it could be used as a basis for getting greater support to help the injured get better care and live longer (and hopefully more prosperously).

        Sigh.

        Another thing to think about is that the longer you live with an injury, the more likely it is that some oddball event will happen that threatens your life. A fire at your residence that an AB would escape, a bedsore resulting from an inadvertent unexpected event, an episode of the flu or pneumonia that is harder to survive. Those probably contribute to shifting the mortality rates downward. Something where remaining vigilant and safety conscious (getting flu shots, having sufficient exits and fire alarms, etc.) would also improve your odds.

        *************
        AB wife of T8 complete para
        *************
        AB wife of T8 complete para

        Comment


          #5
          Belle - Thank you so much. I was thinking and hoping similar things but couldn't express them as well as you.

          I'm really active, pressure sore resistant, infection resistant, I can cough normally [really helps avoid respiratory illness], I'm becoming really health conscious, I'm married, and my wife is younger. So I refuse to be disheartened by the average.

          My wife and I are trying to get in a position to start a family. And I want to live to see my grandchildren before checking out. Thanks for posting.

          ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~
          ~See you at the CareCure-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

          Comment


            #6
            I don't know if this information will be helpful Jeff but I feel I have more than beaten the odds for longevity.

            I am a female with a C6/C7 injury from a diving accident back in 1958 at age 14. Complete or incomplete was not in our vocabulary back then so never have figured out for sure what it means. I have not regained anything since the accident anyway. I have strong arms and shoulders but bad dexterity in my hands.

            I have had a wonderful full active life. I hit age 60 this year and other than feeling my age like everybody else I still feel well and healthy. I really believe the secret is good family and friends around me and a determination to want to experiance everything I can in spite of my injury. If I have to be here, I want it to be a good experiance.

            I did meet the man created for me and we just celebrated our 40th wedding anniversary. We have two natural child birth children ages 38 and 36. Our children have blessed us with 6 grand children. My husband left for work everyday while I stayed home to raised our children, took care of the house, & enjoyed many hobbies. I drove a 2 door car for many years and learned to pull my chair into the back seat. As the shoulders started aching from wear and tear we puchased a van with a lift about 9 years ago. We have many memories of a fun life full of fun experiances.

            Through the years I experianced UTIs, survived breast cancer 10 years ago (still cancer free today), & through time I had a couple broken knees from going headfrist out of my wheelchair. I normally don't have problem with pressure sores since my roho cushion. However, when I was younger before the roho, I did have pressure sores removed surgically two different times about 10 years apart.

            I just have to believe it can work if we have people around us who love us but will allow us to be as normal and independent as we can be. It does take work on our part to take care of ourselves, care about our appearance, & have good exercise and diet. We need to keep moving and keep the weight down. And keep the pressure releases going. I have faced many emotional ups and downs and my family have been patient for me to pull myself back up again. I believe we have to know our health care needs and have a physician who will work with us to meet the correct needs. I do understand your concern to be around for your children. That was always a concern for me.

            Actually, I do happen to be facing the decision right now whether or not to go through rotator cuff surgery if the insurance will cover the post-op care. I do not want to go through it because it will be a long tough recovery. If I indeed do decide to do it I will have to go for it with all I have in me. On the same hand, I do not want my independent mobility to be stopped by a bum arm. I like shopping too much. We are just waiting to see how this one plays out.

            Sounds to me like you are in good shape and have a good attitude and are on the right track. The odds of life statistics are beaten all the time. That is all anyone can work towards and the rest is out of our hands. Good luck Jeff and live long and happy.

            Comment


              #7
              thedestiny, your post brings tears to my eyes and fills me with optimism. Wow. What an amazing story. That was exactly what I needed to hear. Thank you so much.

              ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~
              ~See you at the CareCure-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

              Comment


                #8
                I was reading the life expectancy charts from UAB and would like to know what the category "motor functional at any level" means.
                Can anyone help me with this.

                Thanks

                Comment


                  #9
                  You are so welcome Jeff. Statistics are made up of titles and numbers and you can create your own category and numbers. You and your wife enjoy those grand children and all your other accomplishments along the way. [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]

                  Jan

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Hi Jeff. I am ac6/c7 imcomplete, motorcycle accident in i956, that's 48 years. ......i'm now 68 and still going.

                    olly
                    olly

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thank you Jeff for starting this topic. I always love to read your posts! You are so encouraging!

                      Thedestiny wrote: I did meet the man created for me and we just celebrated our 40th wedding anniversary. We have two natural child birth children ages 38 and 36. Our children have blessed us with 6 grand children. My husband left for work everyday while I stayed home to raised our children, took care of the house, & enjoyed many hobbies. I drove a 2 door car for many years and learned to pull my chair into the back seat. As the shoulders started aching from wear and tear we puchased a van with a lift about 9 years ago. We have many memories of a fun life full of fun experiances.


                      I nearly fell out when I read this!!!!! This sounds like me in a few years!!! I'm c6/7, have a wonderful husband and 2 boys (ages 5 and 10). Your post uplifted me soooo much. I'm now looking forward to one day enjoying my grandchildren! You are so right about family...they have gotten me through. Thanks for sharing this...it made my day!

                      Shannon
                      C6/7 incomplete
                      Shannon
                      C6/7 incomplete
                      20 yrs post sci

                      "falling is easy it's getting back up that becomes the problem, becomes the problem" Staind
                      "A synonym is a word you use when you can't spell the word you first thought of.:" :-)
                      - Burt Bacharach

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The better insurance you have the longer you will live, I mean they will keep you alive.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Dying before my daughter is grown and on her own is a huge concern for me. In my 26 SCI years, my health has been pretty good. I have some AB friends who worry probably as much as I do that they will die before their children are grown. I think it's a pretty common feeling.

                          I just received this email:
                          Do you realize that the only time in our lives when we like to
                          get old is when we're kids? If you're less than 10 years old, you're so
                          excited about aging that you think in fractions.
                          "How old are you?" "I'm four and a half!" You're never
                          thirty-six and a half. You're four and a half, going on five!
                          That's the key.
                          You get into your teens, now they can't hold you back. You jump
                          to the next number, or even a few ahead.
                          "How old are you?" "I'm gonna be 16!" You could be 13, but hey,
                          you're gonna be 16! And then the greatest day of your life . . . you
                          become 21. Even the words sound like a ceremony . . . YOU BECOME 21.
                          YESSSS!!!
                          But then you turn 30. Oooohh, what happened there? Makes you
                          sound like bad milk. He TURNED; we had to throw him out. There's no fun
                          now, you're Just a sour-dumpling. What's wrong? What's changed?
                          You BECOME 21, you TURN 30, then you're PUSHING 40.
                          Whoa! Put on the brakes, it's all slipping away. Before you know
                          it, you REACH 50 . . . and your dreams are gone.
                          But wait!!! You MAKE it to 60. You didn't think you would!
                          So you BECOME 21, TURN 30, PUSH 40, REACH 50 and MAKE it to 60.
                          You've built up so much speed that you HIT 70! After that it's a
                          day-by-day thing; you HIT Wednesday!
                          You get into your 80s and every day is a complete cycle; you HIT
                          lunch; you TURN 4:30; you REACH bedtime.
                          And it doesn't end there. Into the 90s, you start going
                          backwards; "I Was JUST 92."
                          Then a strange thing happens. If you make it over 100, you
                          become a little kid again. "I'm 100 and a half!"
                          May you all make it to a healthy 100 and a half!!
                          HOW TO STAY YOUNG
                          1. Throw out nonessential numbers. This includes age, weight and
                          height. Let the
                          doctors worry about them. That is why you pay " them " .
                          2. Keep only cheerful friends. The grouches pull you down.
                          3. Keep learning. Learn more about the computer, crafts,
                          gardening, whatever. Never let the brain idle. " An idle mind is the
                          devil's workshop." And the devil's name is Alzheimer's.
                          4. Enjoy the simple things.
                          5. Laugh often, long and loud. Laugh until you gasp for breath.
                          6. The tears happen. Endure, grieve, and move on. The only
                          person who is with us our entire life, is ourselves. Be ALIVE while you
                          are alive.
                          7. Surround yourself with what you love, Whether it's family,
                          pets, keepsakes, music, plants, hobbies, whatever. Your home is your
                          refuge.
                          8. Cherish your health: If it is good, preserve it. If it is
                          unstable, improve it. If it is beyond what you can improve, get help.
                          9. Don't take guilt trips. Take a trip to the mall, even to the
                          next county; to a foreign country but NOT to where the guilt is.
                          10. Tell the people you love that you love them, at every
                          opportunity.
                          AND ALWAYS REMEMBER:
                          Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by
                          the moments that take our breath away.

                          Alive for 34 years
                          T4/5 complete for 26 years
                          Mom for 7 years

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by olly:

                            Hi Jeff. I am ac6/c7 imcomplete, motorcycle accident in i956, that's 48 years. ......i'm now 68 and still going.

                            olly
                            Yesterday was 25 years for me..............wow!! Thanks for the inspiration (I hate that word, but you know what I mean) [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]
                            Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

                            I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

                            Comment

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