Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

After Baclofen Pump Surgery

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    After Baclofen Pump Surgery

    I'm scheduled to have my pump put in on March 26, but I guess this is a more serious surgery than I had thought. I was told no driving for 2 weeks and to give myself that long to recover before going back to work.

    Is it really going to take that long? I had expected to be back to work a lot sooner than that. Those of you that have the baclofen pump, can you please tell me how long before you could drive or begin PT? I'd really appreciate it.

    I didn't expect to need anyone to stay with me after the surgery! All of my family is out of state and someone would have to fly in to help me! Yikes, I really wasn't plannin on that.
    Tina
    C5-C7 Walking Quad - Very Incomplete
    Aug '03

    #2
    Mine went in in one day, left by afternoon, and I don't remember them telling me I couldn't do anything. They put staples in the front, and a stitch in the back. But, they may have known if they said no, I would do it anyway. So far not a problem, it's been over a year,

    Comment


      #3
      How sore were you? They tell me that I will be really sore. I don't have much feeling there, of course, and even for my bladder aug I wasn't in THAT much pain.
      Tina
      C5-C7 Walking Quad - Very Incomplete
      Aug '03

      Comment


        #4
        The "Hamburger" doesn't really hurt too much, but , having an intrusion never has been my favorite kind of pleasure. It does hurt when I try to bend over to tie my shoes, or pick something up. Kind of like wearing a tight coat, with something in the pocket your too lazy to take out, but, of course, you can't. I've fallen a couple of times on it, I'm 6',1" and 185 lbs. and I'm amazed I haven't broke it yet. It helped alot to take out the spasticity in my left leg, and I get Botox shots too. I'm almost there, I like to use a shopping cart, and go up and down every isle in Sam's Club, Can't miss a bargain. In fact I just went today and got all the excersise I need. Went to the doctor too, and had to ask her to stop smiling so much, she really sees the hard work I put into overcoming my accident. To think, she and the other doc's I now see accused me of hospital shopping, I think I got a good deal !!!!!

        Comment


          #5
          The reason they told my son to take it easy - even cautioned us about turning him gently - was that there are internal stitches as well as the external ones you see on the skin, and you want to give those a chance to heal, as well as to allow the pump to 'settle' into the tissue. Remember, you'll have 2 incision sites, one on your abdomen, and one next to your spinal column. My son's were each about 3 inches long. It's a pretty major deal, and a little more complicated than an augmentation.
          _____________

          Comment


            #6
            I didn't think mine was a big deal. I'm a VA patient and was gone two days after the surgery and had no restrictions put on me. But every place is different. Just had to wear a binder for 2 weeks afterward until it got settled. I'm in the Yahoo group called Pumpsters and they were a big help. You should join if you don't mind e-mails. Subscribe: pumpsters-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
            My pump is amazing.
            Last edited by Jimi5; 28 Feb 2007, 9:41 PM.

            Comment


              #7
              I have considered one of these but I am worried about it. Anyone out there with a small frame who can give me details? Has anyone had bad experiences? I want to see a pic of what it will look like if anyone has one. CAn you feel it when laying on your stomach? I do have sensation here, I am a T12. Thanks and sorry if I stole the thread.
              If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


              Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

              Comment


                #8
                No picture, but it looks like something in your pocket, I'm thin, and between that and no spleen, I've lost a little of my nice, once flat stomach, the price you pay,,,,, I had no option with the spleen, it exploded, when I got hit by a building falling on me,,, oh, well.

                Comment


                  #9
                  YOu should follow the recomendations of your health care provider (surgeon). While you may be able to do more than he/she tells you, it's always better to ere on the side of being conservative.

                  Most of the folks that I see with pumps are told to hold their activity a little so that the pump can settle in and so that they don't break any of the internal stitches. It would be a shame to go through all of this and then ruin it with something that could be prevented.

                  Can you afford to get an attendant for that couple of weeks? It might be an alternative to having your family come and drive you crazy!
                  CKF
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Addiesue,

                    Here is a link to my other post about the pump. Someone there posted a pic of what his looks like.

                    /forum/showthread.php?t=70854




                    Well, I've had a couple people offer to help me get the kids to and from school, so I'm thinking maybe I'll compromise and not drive for a week. (Unless others from church offer more help)
                    Tina
                    C5-C7 Walking Quad - Very Incomplete
                    Aug '03

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I have a small frame. When I had my spinal cord stimulator, it was pretty easy to see the internal part below my rib cage.
                      Alan

                      Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        You really can't notice it unless you look, Imo. I've had one for a decade or so, and nobody has even noticed it unless I brought it up.

                        I go in for the first refill in 6 months - the new pump allows for this due to the big reservoir. Needing only two refills a year is great for my lifestye.
                        Please donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org.
                        Copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

                        Thanks!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by rdf
                          You really can't notice it unless you look, Imo. I've had one for a decade or so, and nobody has even noticed it unless I brought it up.

                          I go in for the first refill in 6 months - the new pump allows for this due to the big reservoir. Needing only two refills a year is great for my lifestye.
                          Does the medicine last 6 months though?? I go every 3 months and they drain 9cc of Baclofen out and pitch it. I used to go 4 months, but they said the medicine is not effective after 90 days. I could go 6 months easy since I'm on such a low dose, but the neurosurgeon says 90 days is the longest interval for the medicine to work.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Offthahook - your Doc is behind the times. Medtronics "recently", last year or so, has now said that Baclofen is good for up to 6 months in a pump.
                            "a T10, who'd Rather be ridin'; than rollin'"

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by McDuff
                              Offthahook - your Doc is behind the times. Medtronics "recently", last year or so, has now said that Baclofen is good for up to 6 months in a pump.
                              He's either ahead or behind the times. Several years ago, he told me I was part of a study to see if Baclofen could go longer than 90 days. I was fine and went 120 days. I thought it was all good and my neurosurgeon is supposedly an expert on the pump. He has been putting them in forever and is in really tight with Medtronic. Then, I heard he was not going over 90 days in any of his patients because he had couple people complain that, after 90 days, the medication wasn't as effective. I think I'll just call him...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X