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    Does sediment= UTI?

    Does sediment in urine always mean a UTI? I don't have a fever. But, there is most certainly some kind of gunk present....What is it? Should I be taking some precautions, actions, or some route of action?

    "When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."
    Franklin D. Roosevelt
    "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
    - Alan Kay

    #2
    Amanda - Is the presence of sediment in your urine new for you? Does your urine have an odor? Is there any change in spasticity? Do you have an indwelling cath or do you do intermittent catheterization?

    What is your amount of fluid intake? You can try to increase your fluid intake to 10 - 8 oz glasses, to see if that will help flush your bladder. Sediment does not necessarily mean you have a UTI. Have you had any problems with bladder stones or been evaluated for such a problem?

    I have asked a lot of questions. I will try to provide more guidance with a little more information. CRF
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      sediment is common, i know when i each starchy foods-spaghetti or potatoes i get lots of sediment, wqater should flush it
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      John@bike-on.com
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        #4
        Presence of sediment is not new for me, but there is an increase of it.
        No odor.
        No change in spasticity.
        I do intermittent catherization.
        I've never been evaluated for bladder stones.
        Umm, is that everything?

        "When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."
        Franklin D. Roosevelt
        "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
        - Alan Kay

        Comment


          #5
          Amanda - I would suggest that you increase your fluid intake for 2 to 3 days to see if that will change the amount of sediment. However, I know that this may be difficult depending on your IC schedule. It may just bear watching for a few days. If you have no other UTI symptoms, you probably need not be concerned. CRF
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            Thans...That shouldn't be hard to do. So, if I increase intake and sediment is still there or doesn't at least decrease, what should I be watching for to imply a problem?

            "When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."
            Franklin D. Roosevelt
            "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
            - Alan Kay

            Comment


              #7
              Amanda - Do you have a urologist who is familiar with SCI? Have you had a complete urological evaluation done with urodynamics, etc within the past year? If you have not been seen during this time period, it may be time for an appointment. If you remain asymptomatic, but the sediment continues or gets worse, I would suggest that you contact your urologist. A discussion with a nurse in his office may clarify whether you need to be seen or not. If you begin to develop signs of a UTI (odor to urine, high fever, chills, nausea, increased spasticity) , then you definitely need to go to the doctor. Hope this helps. CRF
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #8
                Vinegar Test

                I'm always fearful when I see sediment in my urine that I have another UTI. I'm L1/2 para using intermittent catheterization. It turns out that 9 times out of 10, or even 49 times out of 50 my sediment is caused by something other than an infection, usually cheese from the day before. After some extensive research on PubMed I found an article about urine sediment. My takeaway from the article is testing my urine with white vinegar. I catch some of the cloudy urine in a glass jar and then add a couple of teaspoons of vinegar. It's miraculous to see the urine suddenly become clear. That means, from everything I can tell that don't have an infection, that it was undisolved calcium. (Of course, it's a major disappointment to see it remain cloudy.) Hope this is helpful.

                Originally posted by amanda View Post
                Does sediment in urine always mean a UTI? I don't have a fever. But, there is most certainly some kind of gunk present....What is it? Should I be taking some precautions, actions, or some route of action?

                "When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."
                Franklin D. Roosevelt
                Last edited by atusler; 5 Apr 2014, 11:05 PM.

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                  #9
                  Sediment is not necessarily an indication of a UTI. It can be from a variety of issues, including stones, diet and lack of fluids. While, it can be an indication of infection, likelihood is not, unless it is a change for you.
                  ckf
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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