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  • quad or para?

    What am I?
    My level of injury is c5/c6. I function on a higher level, not sure exactly what level that is.
    I don't know medically speaking how I am classified. I have use of all 4 limbs, so logically I say I am a para. But, I believe my level of injury points the other way.Help!!! I probably need to know this, but I don't.

    The heart seems to have its reasons which even reason cannot understand.
    "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
    - Alan Kay

  • #2
    technically speaking, an incomplete quad.

    by definition, quads have cervical injuries. paras have thoracic or lower.

    it's just a classification, not a descriptor of function.

    ______________
    There will be plenty of time to rest when I'm dead and gone, until then, 150% straight ahead....

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    • #3
      i think if you have full funnction in your hands means your level of function is t something, which means your a para

      Even if your body cannot move, you can still think and meditate ~Dalai Lama~

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      • #4
        Functionally a para has deficencies in only 2 limbs (their legs) while a quad has deficencies in 4 limbs. So even though my arms are fully functional my hands have deficencies so I'm still a quad. My neck was broken at the C6 level but I recovered functionally to C8.

        "Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow"
        ~ Anon
        Emily, C-8 sensory incomplete mom to a 8 year old and a preschooler. TEN! years post.

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        • #5
          Amanda,
          I was injured at C3/C4 but have use of all 4 limbs. I am considered an incomplete quad, as are you. It means that we have impairments in all 4 extremities, although compared to others, they may be relatively minor. A para will have no deficits in their upper extremities, although their legs might be far less functional than ours. Quadri = four
          plegia = weakness

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          • #6
            Amanda -- As others have said, your injury is considered to be an incomplete quadriparesis. Paresis because you mention you have use of all 4 limbs meaning weakness of muscles, quad because your injury is above the T1 level. PLG
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            • #7
              I would recommend reading Dr. Young's article on the ASIA system.

              Using this system, your neurologic injury is called by the lowest motor level with a muscle grade of 3 or better and normal sensation. If you have poor sensation and good strength (or the reverse), you would still have to "move up" the cord segments to find the level that meets both criteria.

              You can have different levels on the right or left side, but you cannot have more than one level on the same side (using this criteria). So someone with a C5/C6 injury would have C5 as the lowest intact cord segment on the right, and C6 as the lowest intact cord segment on the left.

              In addition, you are then rated (using the ASIA scale) on how incomplete your injury is as an A, B, C, D or E.

              Tetraplegia (formerly quadriplegia) is any neurologic injury above T1, while paraplegia is considered any injury T1 and below. The term "paresis" is now discouraged.

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              • #8
                I just re-read this and realized I said I have use of all 4 limbs...so not true. Not sure how that came out. I have use of both arms. Both legs- nada. I have a really good right hand. But, the left is not the best. My right functions on a T1 lvl...my left on a c7.So, if my injury is c-lvl, but I function {at least on one side} is t-lvl what does that mean? I'm sorry for the confusion....I still don't know how I am " labeled", "classified", whatever it may be.

                "When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."
                Franklin D. Roosevelt
                "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
                - Alan Kay

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                • #9
                  Amanda - Dr. Young may further clarify your question about classification. However, for purposes of identifying your functional level, I think the best is to describe yourself as a C7/T1 injury. If you have some deficits on one side within the cervical range, you do have a quadriplegic injury. CRF
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you everyone for the input...sorry for the confusion....It's nice to know as much about my injury as possible, even if it is text book knowledge.

                    "When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."
                    Franklin D. Roosevelt
                    "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
                    - Alan Kay

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                    • #11
                      Amanda, you appear to have had a C5/6 injury and recovered to C7 on the left and C8 on the right. The terms of quad (tetra) and para refer to injuries of the neck and below. If you don't have any function in the anal sphincter, that means that you have an ASIA A at C7. The level is defined as the lowest level that has a normal function.

                      Wise.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wise Young:

                        Amanda, you appear to have had a C5/6 injury and recovered to C7 on the left and C8 on the right. The terms of quad (tetra) and para refer to injuries of the neck and below. If you don't have any function in the anal sphincter, that means that you have an ASIA A at C7. The level is defined as the lowest level that has a normal function.

                        Wise.
                        Dr. Young,

                        How would someone be classified if they have totally normal function on one side, but not another? My son's left side is totally normal motor-wise, but he has reduced temperature sensation on that side. He even has fine motor dexterity and strength on his good side. His right side, however, is not normal. He has normal traps and then below that he has movement in almost every muscle, but varying degrees of strength. (Some muscles have little strength.) That side has normal temp. and pain sensation. He has been told by his physical therapists and a physician that he has recovered more like a stroke victim, in that one side seems to be so unaffected in the motor area. Would he be a C2 on one side and nothing on the other, or are temperature sensation abnormalities taken into account when determining a level?

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Wise

                          "When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."
                          Franklin D. Roosevelt
                          "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."
                          - Alan Kay

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                          • #14
                            I am much the same as you, have good abs and biceps but some weakness in my grip, I am told I am C8/T1. My Wife is T1 but has good grip in her hands. By the way any idea why sometimes they miss out C8 and jump from T1 to C7?

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                            • #15
                              LFC,

                              The condition that you describe is hemiplegia (indicative of complete motor loss on one side) or hemiparesis (partial motor loss on one side). This is an "incomplete" injury if there is preservation of anal sphincter sensation or contraction.

                              By the way, hemiplegia is very rare for people with spinal cord injury. It may be present during the first weeks or months after injury but almost everybody will recover substantial function if they have hemiplegia or hemiparesis.

                              There is usually a separation of proprioceptive and pain sensations on the two sides, if the hemiparesis/hemiplegia is due to an injury of the spinal cord. An injury that involves one side of the spinal cord more than the other is called a Brown-Secquard syndrome.

                              A Brown-Secquard syndrome is characterized by weakness and loss of proprioceptive (position and fine touch sensation) on the side of the injury, associated with loss of pain-temperature sensation on the other. In general, most people with Brown-Secquard will recover walking.

                              The neurological level is defined as the lowest spinal segmental level that has "normal" motor and sensory function.

                              Wise.

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