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Who here drinks vinegar to help their UTI's??

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    Who here drinks vinegar to help their UTI's??

    I'm writing a small article on vinegar + UTI's for my next column in New Mobility. Can anyone here attest to its validity?

    Many thanks!

    theophania79@yahho.com
    May the fetus you save be gay

    #2
    i don't drink it to fight uti....i clean with it to fight uti, put it in wipes to clean around sp tube and stoma and clean cath bag with it...keeps e-coli down with out chemicals..........i didn't know about drinking it.......

    Comment


      #3
      Drink it?

      Maybe just a rumor but I thought it thins the blood?

      However, I have had bladder aug, still cath through penis, and
      DO USE a ratio of 1/6 Vinegar-saline for irrigating about a total of
      300 ccs. The vinegar does help soften, unclog, (insert verb here) the mucous in the bladder and makes it easier for me to draw out the piston syringe.

      Joe


      J.
      Last edited by NoDecafPlz; 6 Sep 2006, 5:48 PM.
      And the truth shall set you free.

      Comment


        #4
        I've downed some in the past as a dare. Unless you want to projectile vomit through your nose like I did, I wouldn't try it if I was you.

        Comment


          #5
          I've read/heard that vinegar helps keep the urinary tract acidic (same as cranberry juice and vitamin C) and thus helps reduce infections. The recipe that I saw was 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar, 1 teaspoon honey, and a full glass of water. Unfortunately, I can't attest to its' effectiveness because I've never tried it ... sorry.
          "This is a life like no other ... this is the Great Adventure" -- Steven Curtis Chapman

          Comment


            #6
            Im wondering if you would get the same effect if you just ate alot of vinegar based products....re pickles, dressing, sauces. Just a thought.

            Good luck Tiff. I always look forward to your articles.
            T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

            My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

            Comment


              #7
              i know CC member umb...(sp?) from norway has said he drinks it. he doesnt accept messages from CC though, so... anyone know how to contact him?
              May the fetus you save be gay

              Comment


                #8
                How 'bout doing an article on beer and how it helps fight UTI's. THEN you'll get some responses
                "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

                Comment


                  #9
                  I use it as a vinegar bath (watered down) on Chad to treat yeast ... never tried for UTIs. Hmmmmmm. A new idea perhaps!
                  Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

                  Comment


                    #10
                    i use to drink a shot of apple cider vinegar a day..

                    here are a ton of uses..

                    http://www.angelfire.com/cantina/hom...ar.html#Health





                    Life isn't like a bowl of cherries or peaches. It's more like a jar of jalapenos--What you do today might burn your ass tomorrow.

                    If you ain't laughing, you ain't living, baby. Carlos Mencia

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by DeadEye
                      How 'bout doing an article on beer and how it helps fight UTI's. THEN you'll get some responses
                      I wholeheartedly agree!
                      Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                      T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Theophania
                        I'm writing a small article on vinegar + UTI's for my next column in New Mobility. Can anyone here attest to its validity?

                        Many thanks!

                        theophania79@yahho.com
                        Theophania,

                        It is probably not a good idea to drink vinegar to acidify urine. Although vinegar (acetic acid) is frequently used for bladder irrigation and has questionable efficacy for preventing urinary infections (see Waites, et al., 2006 below) acetic acid is not usually given orally for acidification of urine. The reason is that the body has many ways of removing acid besides dumping it into urine. For example, if you have low pH, the body used its bicarbonate buffer system to convert the acid to CO2 and you exhale the acid that way. Large amounts of oral vinegar (acetic acid) puts stress on the kidneys and many factors that affect urine acidification by the kidneys.

                        One way to acidify urine is to use organic acids that are not broken down and secreted into the urine. One popular method is to take 1.5-2.0 grams of ascorbic acid per day. If you take more than your body needs, the kidney excretes the ascorbate into the urine. However, there is no evidence that high dose ascorbic acid is effective in preventing kidney stones although there is some evidence suggesting that it will acidify urine and perhaps help prevent urinary tract infection. Sour juices contain a variety of other organic acids that may acidify urine. Cranberry juice or concentrate is popular.

                        A common drug that is used to acidify the urine is ammonium chloride (1.5-3.0 grams per day) to acidify urine in patients who have infected kidney stones. Another drug is lysine dihydrochloride. Finally, people should understand that taking organic acids may change the pharmacokinetics of other drugs that they are taking.

                        People who are attempting to acidify their urine should drink plenty of fluids. This reduces the accumulation of acid in the body and gives the kidney plenty of fluids to move the acid into the urine. Cranberry juice, 18 or more oz. per day, is recommended. In the old days, many doctors use to prescribe methanamine (mandelamine) which converts to formaldehyde in the presence of acid urine and this tends to reduce bacteria colonization but the efficacy of this for preventing urinary tract infections has also been questioned.

                        I don't know if this is helpful. Vinegar is not a magic bullet.

                        Wise.
                        1. Waites KB, Canupp KC, Roper JF, Camp SM and Chen Y (2006). Evaluation of 3 methods of bladder irrigation to treat bacteriuria in persons with neurogenic bladder. J Spinal Cord Med 29: 217-26. BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: We conducted a randomized, double-blind comparison of twice daily bladder irrigation using 1 of 3 different solutions in community-residing persons with neurogenic bladder who used indwelling catheters to evaluate efficacy in treatment of bacteriuria. METHODS: Eighty-nine persons with bacteriuria were randomized to irrigate their bladders twice daily for 8 weeks with 30 mL of (a) sterile saline, (b) acetic acid, or (c) neomycin-polymyxin solution. Urinalysis, cultures, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed at baseline and weeks 2, 4, and 8 to determine the extent to which each of the solutions affected numbers and types of bacteria, urinary pH, urinary leukocytes, and generation of antimicrobial-resistant organisms. RESULTS: Bladder irrigation was well tolerated with the exception of 3 participants who had bladder spasms. None of the 3 irrigants had a detectable effect on the degree of bacteriuria or pyuria in 52 persons who completed the study protocol. A significant increase in urinary pH occurred in all 3 groups. No significant development of resistance to oral antimicrobials beyond what was observed at baseline was detected. CONCLUSIONS: Bladder irrigation was generally well tolerated for 8 weeks. No advantages were detected for neomycin-polymyxin or acetic acid over saline in terms of reducing the urinary bacterial load and inflammation. We cannot recommend bladder irrigation as a means of treatment for bacteriuria in persons with neurogenic bladder. Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. waites@path.uab.edu http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16859225
                        2. Hess B and Ackermann D (1992). [Preventive measures in stones due to infection, uric acid and cystine]. Ther Umsch 49: 44-8. General prophylaxis of renal stone formation consists of 1. high fluid intake and 2. modest consumption of protein-rich foods. Specific prophylactic measures are based on pathophysiologic mechanisms of stone formation. In infection-induced renal stones, combined treatment with culture specific antibiotics and complete stone removal is of utmost importance. In all cases where stone fragments cannot be removed completely and/or partial obstruction remains, long-term antibiotics in combination with urine acidification by methionine (urine pH 5.6 to 6.2) are most appropriate. Prophylaxis of uric acid stones primarily consists of reducing purine intake and alkalizing the urine by potassium citrate. Only if this regimen failed or gout occurred, allopurinol should be administered. In patients with cystine stones, urine volume should be increased to greater than 3000 ml/die. Alkalizing the urine to a pH greater than 7.5 rises cystine solubility, whereas cystine excretion may be reduced by a diet low in sodium and/or low in methionine/cysteine. Thiols form mixed thiol-cysteine disulfides that are many times more soluble than cystine in urine; because of their high rate of adverse side-effects, however, these compounds are of lowest priority in the treatment of cystine stones. There is no convincing evidence for the efficacy of high dose ascorbic acid treatment in cystinuria. Urologisch-nephrologische Steinsprechstunde, Medizinische Universitatspoliklinik, Inselspital, Bern. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=1736401
                        3. Wall I and Tiselius HG (1990). Long-term acidification of urine in patients treated for infected renal stones. Urol Int 45: 336-41. The effects of ammonium chloride, methenamine hippurate and ascorbic acid on urinary pH was studied in 14 normal subjects. A statistically significant reduction of urinary pH was recorded with ammonium chloride in daily doses of 1.5 and 3 g, but not with 2 g of methenamine hippurate or 1.8 g of ascorbic acid. Long-term treatment with ammonium chloride in doses between 1.5 and 3 g was given to 11 patients in order to reduce the risk of new stone formation or growth of fragments remaining after disintegration of infected renal stones. Biochemical stone analyses showed struvite in 9 of the treated stones, and urine cultures verified the presence of urease-producing bacteria in 10 patients. Apart from ammonium chloride, the patients were treated with antibiotics, in 4 patients continuously and in the others during periods from 2 to 34 months. The patients were followed for an average period of 32 months. No adverse reactions were recorded with the dosage used. Initially, 6 patients were stone-free, whereas 5 had residual stone fragments with a largest diameter ranging from 4 to 20 mm. At follow-up, 2 patients were still stone-free, and of 5 patients with residual fragments 1 showed stable disease and 3 an improved stone situation. In 5 patients, 3 of whom had residual stone fragments, antibiotic treatment had been interrupted without infectious relapse.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Department of Urology, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=2288050
                        4. Simpson GM and Khajawall AM (1983). Urinary acidifiers in phencyclidine detoxification. Hillside J Clin Psychiatry 5: 161-8. Urinary acidification is widely used to increase the excretion rate of PCP in abusers. Various acidifying techniques were used and compared with regard to efficacy in lowering pH, side effects, and patient acceptability. On the basis of our findings and data from routine monitoring with test tapes, we would recommend the following acidifications procedures as efficacious and reasonably well tolerated: Ammonium chloride, 4 gm. per day, 1 gm. q.i.d., with sufficient water or cranberry juice. Lysine dihydrochloride, 6 gm. per day, 2 gm. t.i.d., with sufficient water or cranberry juice. Lysine hydrochloride, 8 gm. per day, 2 gm. q.i.d., with water or cranberry juice. Cranberry juice, 18 or more oz. per day alone, or plus lysine, ammonium chloride, or ascorbic acid. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=6423507
                        5. Nahata MC, Cummins BA, McLeod DC, Schondelmeyer SW and Butler R (1982). Effect of urinary acidifiers on formaldehyde concentration and efficacy with methenamine therapy. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 22: 281-4. Twenty-seven patients with indwelling urinary catheters and chronic bacteriuria were studied for methenamine efficacy. In a crossover fashion, each patient received methenamine mandelate granules 4 g/day alone, with ascorbic acid 4 g/day, and with ascorbic acid 4 g/day plus cranberry cocktail one 1/day. Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and E. coli were the common pathogens. Urinary acidifiers had no significant effect on mean urine pH, however, high urinary formaldehyde concentrations were associated with the use of ascorbic acid. Bacteriocidal formaldehyde levels were more frequently present in patients with acidic urine pH than those with alkaline pH. Although ascorbic acid increased formaldehyde levels, additional cranberry cocktail had no further effect. Despite higher formaldehyde levels, urine culture results were positive in most cases with or without urine acidification. Methenamine therapy may be of limited value in asymptomatic chronic bacteriuric patients with indwelling catheters. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=7106162
                        6. Ekvall S, Chen IW and Bozian R (1981). The effect of supplemental ascorbic acid on serum vitamin B12 levels in myelomeningocele patients. Am J Clin Nutr 34: 1356-61. Serum levels of ascorbic acid and vitamin B12 were analyzed in 40 myelomeningocele children to study the effect of supplemental ascorbic acid on serum vitamin B12 levels. The experimental group was composed of 20 children receiving ascorbic acid for urinary acidification: 10 received an average of 1.8 g daily, 10 received an average of 1.5 g daily (the amount depending on the requirement needs for urinary acidification) half of each group received ascorbic acid for less than 3 yr (an average of 2.1 yr) and half received ascorbic acid for more than 3 yr (an average of 4.3 yr). The control group consisted of 20 myelomeningocele children not receiving supplemental ascorbic acid. Both groups were matched for age, sex, race, and physical activity. Dietary levels of ascorbic acid and B12 were calculated to rule out their influence on serum levels. Results showed that the experimental group with supplemental ascorbic acid produced significantly higher ascorbic acid values than the control group. The serum B12 levels of the experimental group were not significantly different than those of the control groups and these children showed neither a deficient serum levels of B12, anemia, nor elevated mean corpuscular volume. Hemoglobin levels were slightly higher for the experimental group. Dietary calculations of B12 and ascorbic acid were not significantly greater than the Recommended Daily Allowance ruling out any influence of diet on serum levels. No evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency developed in 20 myelomeningocele children receiving daily mean doses of 1.65 g of supplemental ascorbic acid. In view of our findings, it is highly improbable that megadoses of supplemental ascorbic acid would induce vitamin B12 deficiency in man. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=7258126
                        7. Marquardt H, Bartolmas E and Nagel R (1973). [Results of drug-induced acidification of the urine in 103 patients with urinary infection and-or urolithiasis]. Urologe A 12: 173-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=4580090

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Interestingly, cranberry juice throws Chad's bladder into an absolute hissy fit. I give him cranberry supplements (of which I know the evidence is mixed and at best, quite weak), but I figure it can't hurt. So I give him water only, with an occassional Coke (he begs and I can't resist that puppy dog look .... ). Even worse is lemonade - if he drinks that I have to cath him every hour - no joke - and we have to give him bladder meds to calm it down (belladonna/opium suppositories, which believe me, are NOT easy to get as they are compounded and a major major major DEA target!!). Our urologist is great though and will help him. So, now I refuse to give him lemonade no matter what, and only cranberry when mixed with ginger ale or water. Thought I'd throw in that total ancedote. Also, I give him 4,000 mg/vit C a day. He's done that for 15+ years, and high doses of Vit C have some (questionable) efficacy in other things, such as cancer prevention, and does not harm you in huge doses, so I figure, why mess with a good thing? So far, no bladder infections in about 4 months ... and counting.

                          Ami
                          Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Interesting about the lemonade Ami, sometimes Orange Juice sets me on fire and it takes a couple of days for the burning to subside.
                            T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

                            My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

                            Comment


                              #15
                              wise, everyone, thank you for your responses. ive done research on drinking vinegar online. it appears to have been a homeopathic remedy used for centuries for a variety of ailments.

                              i read mixing 1 tablespoon vinegar to 8 oz of water can help with a variety of things. thats why i thought perhaps it could also help uti's. to experiment, i tried drinking rice vinegar in the above said dose a couple weeks ago. overall, my entire body felt amazing. uti subsided too. i then tried drinking a bit of the pple cider vinegar, to no avail.

                              very odd.

                              wise, i might use your comments in my article if thats ok with you.
                              May the fetus you save be gay

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