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Irragating with purified water and vinegar

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    #16
    There is no good evidence for vinegar bladder instillations or irrigations being effective in either the prevention or treatment of UTIs.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #17
      As a method to reduce colonization?

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        #18
        Originally posted by crags View Post
        As a method to reduce colonization?
        Evaluation of 3 Methods of Bladder Irrigation to Treat Bacteriuria in Persons With Neurogenic Bladder


        Read the entire study at NCBI*: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1864807/

        Ken B Waites, MD,1,2 Kay C Canupp, MSN, CRNP,2 James F Roper, MD, MS,2,3 Susan M Camp, MSN, CRNP,3 and Yuying Chen, MD, PhD2

        Abstract


        Background/Objective:


        We conducted a randomized, double-blind comparison of twice daily bladder irrigation using 1 of 3 different solutions in community-residing persons with neurogenic bladder who used indwelling catheters to evaluate efficacy in treatment of bacteriuria.

        Methods:

        Eighty-nine persons with bacteriuria were randomized to irrigate their bladders twice daily for 8 weeks with 30 mL of (a) sterile saline, (b) acetic acid, or (c) neomycin-polymyxin solution. Urinalysis, cultures, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed at baseline and weeks 2, 4, and 8 to determine the extent to which each of the solutions affected numbers and types of bacteria, urinary pH, urinary leukocytes, and generation of antimicrobial-resistant organisms.

        Results:

        Bladder irrigation was well tolerated with the exception of 3 participants who had bladder spasms. None of the 3 irrigants had a detectable effect on the degree of bacteriuria or pyuria in 52 persons who completed the study protocol. A significant increase in urinary pH occurred in all 3 groups. No significant development of resistance to oral antimicrobials beyond what was observed at baseline was detected.

        Conclusions:

        Bladder irrigation was generally well tolerated for 8 weeks. No advantages were detected for neomycin-polymyxin or acetic acid over saline in terms of reducing the urinary bacterial load and inflammation. We cannot recommend bladder irrigation as a means of treatment for bacteriuria in persons with neurogenic bladder.

        This study showed that twice daily bladder washout with saline, acetic acid, or neomycin-polymyxin solution is well tolerated by most persons with neurogenic bladder managed by an indwelling Foley catheter. The procedure did not cause pain or inflammation beyond what is already present in the urine or lead to the generation of antimicrobial-resistant organisms beyond their baseline occurrence. This conclusion must be tempered with the fact that there was already a high prevalence of MRSA and MDR gram-negative bacilli in the study population. The results were disappointing, although not entirely unexpected, in that that no beneficial effect of any of the 3 irrigant solutions on reducing bacterial colony counts or urinary leukocytes, or improving the quality of urine overall could be shown. In view of these findings, there is no basis on which to recommend the use of bladder irrigation as a routine method for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in catheterized persons with neurogenic bladder. Future studies incorporating an increased volume of irrigant, frequency of instillations, and/or duration of treatment should be considered.

        *NCBI
        The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.


        All the best,
        GJ





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          #19
          heres a good read as well. apparently many are very successful
          http://www.newmobility.com/2015/12/b...ant-solutions/
          Bike-on.com rep
          John@bike-on.com
          c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
          sponsored handcycle racer

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            #20
            And, there are those of us, me included, who use HydroCleanse, Microcyn, MicrocynAH and have very good luck with it. I know there are those who either don't like it or haven't had the results that I and others have had. But, my urine is generally crystal clear, no odor, no sediment, no clogged catheter, no urinary tract infections in a bit over 2 years. Supra pubic catheter in place.

            All the best,
            GJ
            Last edited by gjnl; 10 Oct 2016, 7:14 PM.

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              #21
              Thanks for posting this article gjnl - great reference

              pbr
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                #22
                here is another good read on irrigation I came across
                https://www.oumedicine.com/docs/ad-u...e.pdf?sfvrsn=2
                Bike-on.com rep
                John@bike-on.com
                c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
                sponsored handcycle racer

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