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    colonoscopy

    any one have one?
    whats the best prep for a c4 quad?

    #2
    Originally posted by Tuesday
    any one have one?
    whats the best prep for a c4 quad?
    I'm not sure if the prep will be different for a quad or a para (that's me). I did speak to the Dr. that's doing my piles and he suggested I would be a good candidate for a "virtual colonoscopy" -- you swallow a camera and it goes through the GI tract -- because there is no easy/good prep.

    You could ask your Dr. about it, I will only be able to give an update on mine in about a month.

    Cheers!
    Han Tacoma

    ~ Artificial Intelligence is better than none! ~

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      #3
      Tuesday,

      I wrote this in another thread on the subject:
      I'm a C3/4 and had a colonoscopy a few years back. I fasted for a couple days just taking clear fluids, broths, bouillon, jello, etc. Then cleaned out the morning prior to my appointment and continued the clear fluids. Doc said I was clean as a whistle! Then stopped by Burger Master and gorged!

      They went in from both directions on me, down the throat was much less fun.

      Hope this may at least give you some ideas.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by NWC4
        Tuesday,

        I wrote this in another thread on the subject:
        I'm a C3/4 and had a colonoscopy a few years back. I fasted for a couple days just taking clear fluids, broths, bouillon, jello, etc. Then cleaned out the morning prior to my appointment and continued the clear fluids. Doc said I was clean as a whistle! Then stopped by Burger Master and gorged!

        They went in from both directions on me, down the throat was much less fun.

        Hope this may at least give you some ideas.
        what do you mean by "cleaned out"? regular bp or enema? i went for one but the doc cancelled because of an emergency. i never rescheduled. i did the one day fast deal an tried an enema that morning which just ran back out,lol. was jus wondering if fasting a couple of days then doing bp that morning would be good enough.

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          #5
          I am a C2/C3 incomplete. I just had a colonoscopy and it was not a pleasant experience. The prep work was done at the hospital. My wife ended up doing most of the work, because the staff had no clue how to deal with me. The commode chair that the hospital supplied was hard plastic, with no back support - very uncomfortable. I had to drink about a gallon of this stuff called NuLitely. I didn't quite finish it - the last 2 cups of it made me throw up. It also didn't work as fast as it would on a noninjured person. Finally, after about four hours, I was ready for the procedure. That was a piece of cake when compared to the prep.

          The next day however, my wife discovered a bruise on my left butt cheek, which scared both of us. I worried about skin breakdown for days. It resulted from multiple transfers onto that damn plastic commode chair. It took about 10 days to heal. I had to spend a lot of time doing extra weight shifts, going to bed early, and sleeping on my side. Luckily, I have enough feeling that I knew when it was time to relieve the pressure.

          I'm not trying to discourage you from the procedure, just making you aware of my experience. By the way, the test results showed that I have a perfectly healthy colon!

          Comment


            #6
            The prep is not different for SCI. We admit our patients for a 23 hour stay. This allows them to have their prep with nursing care available, then have the test and go home as soon as you are recovered from the procedure. They must be prepared to deal with any AD episodes during the procedure (a common problem) so be sure there is a plan and that the physician doing the exam knows what to do.

            We generally do not do this on a commode, but in bed with chux and lots of skin cleaning (for the reasons above). We still use Golytely, but my mother (who has MS and is tetraplegic) just had hers and used the oral Fleets mixed in ginger ale, and did much better with no nausea, and was well cleaned out. This is in addition to the 24 hours of clear liquids only (no red jello or red juice, no red popcycles, etc.). I would use this prep instead of the Golytlely. It is not worth not being well prepped...your procedure will have to be cancelled and repeated if you are not cleaned out. The virtual colonoscopy requires the same prep.

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              #7
              I used the Fleet as well. I came in a small bottle which I choked down half at a time followed by water, it worked well. The total process took about 3 hours. I sat on my shower chair and it pretty much resembled one nasty waterfall! Extreme light headedness is an issue, but I can't imagine the mess in bed and I regularly do my MWF routine in bed.

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                #8
                I had a colonoscopy a month and a half ago. I did the NuLytely prep and got it all down except the last two cups also. It took 3 hours for it to take effect. I was told to expect it to take effect about a half hour after beginning the prep so I just sat on the toilet and started drinking at 3:30 pm. 6:30 pm I began to empty. I thought I was finally empty at 11:00 pm so I cleaned up and put on a depends just in case and went to bed (I sat on the toilet the entire time). I woke up to see I wasn't as empty as I thought. My pad was completely covered, the depends diaper was completely soaked and I was pretty much empty now. It was terrible. I asked my doc if I could stay at the hospital for the prep. He said insurance wouldn't cover it. I would have much preferred doing the prep at the hospital. Sitting on the toilet for 8 hours was brutal. I thought for sure I'd have a skin issue, but it never happened, thank god.

                Had one pollup that was removed and not and issue...
                "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

                Comment


                  #9
                  moe, your saga is EXACTLY what I'm trying to avoid. I'm a C6-7 guy and it's time for my colonoscopy. The doc tried to get me in the hospital for the prep but they said no. I have Medicare...if that makes any difference. I was in the hospital about 5 years ago for a few days and one of the tests performed was a colonoscopy so I have "fond" memories of swilling GoLytely and stooling endless amounts of shit, mucous and 98% of my bodily fluids. I think it took about 6 hours to even start shitting and about 12 hours to drink the GoLytely. I oozed stool for days off and on. The scene was ugly, the stench was great, the hospital staff was inept. I don't know what I'm going to do this time around. There has to be a better way to manage the prep. It is very unfair and cruel.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Ask specifically about a "23 hour stay" for hospitalization. Technically (even for Medicare) this is considered an outpatient visit, not inpatient, and they will often pay for it esp. with an explaination of your SCI as a complication. We can do this and admit the person the afternoon prior to the test, and discharge them immediately after their recovery from the anesthesia.
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Anestesia

                      Is the Anastasia normal, or to prevent AD? I'm fairly sure I'll need this done in the near future. I'm EXTREMELY worried about an AD episode!!! Any negatives on the virtual colonoscopy? That seems like a better way to go.

                      -Ron

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                        #12
                        Anastasia


                        I think you mean anesthesia. It is actually called conscious sedation ("twilight sleep"). This is given to relax you and to make you have amnesia for any discomfort during the procedure. It does NOT prevent AD, so you still need to have a plan for how this will be managed if it should occur during the procedure (fairly common) with the physician who is doing it.

                        You still have to have the same prep with the virtual colonoscopy, and it has a downside that if anything abnormal is found (most commonly polyps) which must be biopsied, you have to undergo a second regular colonoscopy to do this. You cannot do a biopsy or remove a polyp during a virtual procedure.


                        (KLD)
                        Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 28 Oct 2005, 8:37 PM.
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by smokey
                          moe, your saga is EXACTLY what I'm trying to avoid. I'm a C6-7 guy and it's time for my colonoscopy. The doc tried to get me in the hospital for the prep but they said no. I have Medicare...if that makes any difference. I was in the hospital about 5 years ago for a few days and one of the tests performed was a colonoscopy so I have "fond" memories of swilling GoLytely and stooling endless amounts of shit, mucous and 98% of my bodily fluids. I think it took about 6 hours to even start shitting and about 12 hours to drink the GoLytely. I oozed stool for days off and on. The scene was ugly, the stench was great, the hospital staff was inept. I don't know what I'm going to do this time around. There has to be a better way to manage the prep. It is very unfair and cruel.
                          First, talk to your doc about exactly how horrible this is for someone with SCI and no home health care (do you know an agency that wants to send help for bowel prep?). This is so far beyond family caregiver requirements. Then suggest using citrate of magnesium. It has a habit of lowering your blood pressure to where you need an IV drip... I managed 4 of the 5 bottles and you couldn't tell if that was a foley or a "colon collection device??" the liquid was so clear after 4 bottles. The RN and I decided 4 bottles was more than enough. Yep, they taped some sort of liquid poop collector to my butt after one bedpan of something vaguely solid. By the time I got to the OR prep area my BP was 52/45. They almost cancelled me till I suggested opening that IV all the way for 5 minutes. Back to my normal 90/60. Also advice the case manager type at Medicare about AD and its side effects like stroke, coma, death, lawsuits... My primary is BC/BS and talking to my gastroenterologist and a case manager I got a 23 hour stay as KLD said.

                          BTW, I had the head of anestiseology come in to tell me if my BP went up I shouldn't freak if I woke up in the ICU. In case of AD she would be called to put me under regular completely knocked out anesthetic and then up to ICU for a few hours to make sure the AD was gone. I had no problems at all with twilight. As soon as I got home I took one immodium and was fine.
                          Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                          Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                            Ask specifically about a "23 hour stay" for hospitalization. Technically (even for Medicare) this is considered an outpatient visit, not inpatient, and they will often pay for it esp. with an explaination of your SCI as a complication. We can do this and admit the person the afternoon prior to the test, and discharge them immediately after their recovery from the anesthesia.
                            KLD, Just exactly where in the hospital does someone like myself stay for 23 hours, get undressed, drink GoLytely, stool, lay down and stool again and so on? Would I typically get a regular hospital room or the "cow barn" section of the endoscopy clinic? I will need hospital staff helping me of course. Thanks.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Some hospitals have a seperate unit for these 23 hour stay patients, while others mix them together with the regular inpatients. It varies, but you have nursing care, and it is not in the same area where the endoscopies are done. Discuss this with your physician. They will be very familiar with 23 hour stay arrangements at the hospitals they use, and can direct you to the right person at the hospital to ask questions.

                              (KLD)
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

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