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s/p catheter change injury

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    s/p catheter change injury

    About four or five weeks ago while changing my suprapubic catheter I managed to sustain an injury, and didn't realize what caused it until now. The catheter went down into my urethra (size 22 French) and the balloon was filled up to 10 cc's. My caregiver realized what happened right afterward and deflated the balloon then made sure that everything was right before inflating again. I didn't worry about it very much because everything seemed to be OK.

    Since then I've been having a problem. When I get an erection it is bent to the left, which never happened in the past. It's like the left side (tube/chamber) of my penis does not fill up with blood as well as the right side does. It's not a very bad problem overall, because everything still works and the bend is only about 15°, but it's just not the same as it used to be. And I can also feel a lot of pain down on the left side of my perineum.

    I just saw my urologist yesterday and he thinks everything will heal on its own in time. He checked me out, and is going to do an ultrasound and a KUB next week. Is there anything else I should ask him to do? I'm quite concerned about this, and even though it's not very bad it is shortening my duration during sex and increasing my refractory period. I'm also concerned about any future effect on my ability to have children.

    Is there anything to worry about? Anything else I can do, etc.?
    Thanks!

    btw, I'm c5/6 complete, 3.5 years post-injury, two years with s/p cath

    #2
    Do you ejaculate during intercourse now? It is unlikely that your fertility would be effected by this unless scarring should include the ejaculatory duct into the urethra. It is likely that you have a hematoma, and that as this reabsorbs you will have less deformity, but scarring long term can cause problems. If it does not subside in another few weeks, you may want to request a urethrogram or have your urologist look inside the urethra with a scope.

    Be sure your caregiver gets a good review of how to avoid doing this again. There is a specific technique needed when changing a SP catheter to avoid doing this, and many nurses do not have this training.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      My urologist is going to do a cystoscopy as well. I assume that during this test he will look at the urethra. I will definitely ask about it.

      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
      Do you ejaculate during intercourse now?
      (KLD)
      No, I have not yet ejaculated during intercourse. How likely is it that this injury may prevent normal ejaculation?
      Last edited by sittinsux; 25 Aug 2005, 1:11 PM. Reason: Typo

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        #4
        I have always had my nurse irrigate the tube after insertion but before the balloon is inflated. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I figure that is the tube is in my urethra, the irrigation water would come streaming out of my penis. If the water just comes out of the tube again (a little yellowed and bloody) then it's probably safe to inflate the balloon.

        Good luck on getting your guy to stand up straight. If not, maybe it can work to your advantage as, say, a G-spot finder...

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          #5
          I asked about ejaculation because you asked about fertility. If you don't ejaculate during intercourse, then having a bent penis will not interfere with fertility, but of course you would still have to have some form of sperm retrieval to use for artificial insemination.

          Irrigation during insertion does not insure that the balloon is not in the urethra. The best way to assure this is to measure the removed catheter (prior to removal mark the stoma edge on the catheter with a felt-tipped marker). Be sure to NOT insert the new catheter any further than this, then inflate the balloon.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment

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