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    stretching

    I would like to know how come when I stretch my sons legs out really good he has very good movement and then in about three hours later he has so much trouble moving them. Example to day I stretched his legs real good[knees bend up as he lies on floor and push legs down to floor] then he sits on the floor with his back against the couch and knees bend he can move legs almost to the floor and back up over to his other knee fast as fast as I can. But three hours later he is having a really hard time moving half the distance. Any infro would be great thanks.
    "When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. That's my religion." — Abraham Lincoln

    #2
    Spasticity

    Spasticity, or excessive muscle tone, is a common problem after SCI. In people who have incomplete injuries, like your son, the spastic muscles can have so much tone that they over-ride the strength of normal or spared muscles.

    Stretching and ROM inhibits or decreases spasticity for several hours, so during that time the normal muscles are not held back as much by those with excessive tone.

    Is he taking any medication for spasticity? While some spasticity is good, if this starts to interfere with normal function, this is an indication for treatment with medication. Please discuss this with your physician, and ask that this also be assessed by his physical therapist.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      Physiotherapy and Spasticity

      You have not mentioned your sons diagnosis, so the following is general advice. The Physiotherapeutic approach not only addresses stretching as a means of spasticity control, but also weight baring and rotational movements. Whether standing would be indicated in this case, would depend on the time between injury and this intervention, but do discuss this option with your sons Physiotherapist or Doctor.

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