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Has anyone used a Convatec fms for colonoscopy prep?

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    Has anyone used a Convatec fms for colonoscopy prep?

    I will have my first colonoscopy soon, and I'd rather not spend the whole prep day in my less-than-comfortable commode chair. With the FMS (basically, an oversized foley catheter with balloon for the bum), I picture myself lying comfortably in bed, free-flowing into a bucket with barely a skid mark on the chux I'm lying on.

    Has anyone tried this? Assuming I'm solid-stool free, is there any reason why I shouldn't?

    #2
    ...
    Last edited by Rook98006; 17 May 2021, 12:50 PM. Reason: .....
    "Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed." - Hunter Thompson
    T5/6 complete

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    • SCI-Nurse
      SCI-Nurse commented
      Editing a comment
      Have you done a colonoscopy prep this way? Not so easy with the amount of liquid stool expelled! (KLD)

    #3
    Do you mean something like the Convatec Flexi-Seal Protect? https://www.convatec.com/continence-...-protect-fms/#
    or the Consure QORA? https://www.consuremedical.com/

    Both are indicated for containment of liquid stool in hospitalized patients, and are usually inserted by trained nurses. Because of the retention balloon or ring, they do hold a significant risk of causing AD in people with SCI at or above T7, and neither is cheap. Unlikely to be covered by insurance for use for a colonoscopy prep, even if you could get your physician to prescribe it. They also have a pretty small collection bag; you would likely have to cut open the bag and have it drain into a bucket, which could be smelly and risk getting stool splashed around.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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    • kilgore
      kilgore commented
      Editing a comment
      I already got a Convatec. You're right-it costs more than it should. Inserting it looks no more invasive than a digital stimulation, but that's a good point to be wary of disreflexia!

    #4
    For posterior... I mean posterity... it didn't work for me. My home health nurse installed it inflated the balloon as directed, checked the pressure indicators. I tolerated it just fine, but found that about half of the fluid leaked out around the tube. We took it out and I transferrd to my commode chair.
    On the bright side (for me), I don't have to do this again for 10 years!

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      #5
      Ugh. Glad you managed to at least successfully get through this.

      This is a nightmare for me to even think about. I shouldn't need one for a few years, but lately I am dealing with colitis and if I can't get it cleared up, a gastro might want me to take one.

      I literally cannot be on the commode for more than 10 or 15 minutes before everything starts to hurt. Specifically my entire back. It's like torture. I was going to start looking to see if they had much more comfortable commodes out there or just anything tolerable.

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      • SCI-Nurse
        SCI-Nurse commented
        Editing a comment
        With assistance, you can do all your evacuation for a colonoscopy in bed with Chux and towels. It is not easy, but if sitting on a commode or toilet is out for you, this may be the best option. You may also inquire about the ability to do a 23 hour outpatient admission to the hospital for the prep, then go home as soon as the procedure is complete, so that the nurses can assist you.

        It is also possible to contain liquid stool with a simple fecal incontinence bag, similar to an ostomy bag. This doesn't have anything inside the rectum, so is unlikely to cause AD. It can remain in place for up to 24 hours.
        (KLD)
        Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 6 Jun 2021, 3:03 PM. Reason: Add information

      #6
      KLD- can you give us a couple links to purchase the fecal incontinence bag you mention above? Does it need a prescription?

      Comment


        #7
        Here are a few sources. You may have to purchase a case lot, although Hollister says they will provide 1 free sample of their version. It does not require a prescription:

        https://www.hollister.com/en/product...ecal-collector

        https://www.vitalitymedical.com/holl...hoCf2AQAvD_BwE

        https://www.walmart.com/ip/Drainable...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

        https://www.homesupply.net/product/s...hoCIYkQAvD_BwE


        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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