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Fosformycin and cath change question.

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    Fosformycin and cath change question.

    I know with 7 or 10 day antibiotics and if you have a indwelling cath you should change your cath early on after the antibiotic killed some germs making the cath change easier. But with fosformycin do you just drink it and change right away or wait a few hours or what? I’ve never used it and don’t know.
    thanks.
    Mark 9:23 - All things are possible for those who believe.

    #2
    Actually, it is best to change your catheter prior to collecting your specimen for urine C&S, then start an antibiotic (if a true UTI) while waiting for the C&S results, and then (at 72 hours) change to the best antibiotic (if indicated) once the sensitivity results are received.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      Yeah thanks. I have always done those steps. These last few years it’s always been Ecoli infections and my lab test show fosformycin works for the ecoli. I’ve never had Fosformycin before and since it’s a drink you have one time I’m unsure when to change the foley cath.
      Mark 9:23 - All things are possible for those who believe.

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        #4
        E. coli can become resistant to any antibiotic. You should always have a C&S test of your urine before starting treatment for a UTI with an antibiotic, and then, at 72 hours, when the sensitivity is complete, check to see if you are actually on the correct antibiotic. If you have bacteria resistant to the antibiotic you are taking, it should be changed to one that shows sensitivity.

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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