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Taking IV as outpatient for UTI?

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    Taking IV as outpatient for UTI?

    My urologist suggested one option I might consider for recurrent klebsiella was IV gentamicin for 2 weeks. Apparently I would have an IV but once a day would go to the hospital to get medication through it.

    My question is how would this work logistically? The IV's I've had in the hospital really weren't something you could lead a normal lifestyle with. If I had them near my elbow they would come undone all the time, especially with transferring or using a wheelchair. But if the IV would be in the wrist, I think it would interfere with things like bowel care or cathing.

    Is there some special IV for outpatients that would work for a para doing a lot of transfers and so on? Or do the normal ones work ok?

    Also, he said gentamicin IV was much easier on the stomach than Levaquin orally - is this right?

    #2
    I needed daily IV antibiotics for an orally resistant UTI about 10 years ago. The nurse came to my house, installed a pic line in my forearm, then came back once a day thereafter to setup the drip. The pic just stayed installed for the duration. It was annoying but workable. Lasted for 14 days IIRC.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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      #3
      as described by Oddity, you would get a PICC line which is an IV that is placed for long term IV access in use for infusions of IV medications
      pbr
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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        #4
        Ok thanks. I looked it up and honestly that sounds kind of scary, a tube going next your heart. I don’t think I have the courage for this disease.

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          #5
          Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
          Ok thanks. I looked it up and honestly that sounds kind of scary, a tube going next your heart. I don’t think I have the courage for this disease.
          Mine was in my forearm. No where near my heart.
          "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

          "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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            #6
            Ive done it no big deal a port put in my arm and a visiting nurse came in once a day and ran the antibiotics easy peasy.

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              #7
              As recently as July of last year I was on IV antibiotics for an infected pressure sore which needed to be opened 7.5 long. I had a central line on my chest. Nowadays technology provides for two easy ways for IV therapy at home without needing a nurse.
              1. IV bag (requires a pole) with a numbered regulator to be set to the prescribed drip.
              2. IV Ball (no pole required), plug and self-regulated drip. Most convenient.
              If you require frequent IV's or have bad access (hard stick), then visit a vascular surgeon to get an under the skin permanent access port.
              I have one implanted in my lap because I can not get one in my chest (preferred site) due to many scares from multiple previous central lines.

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                #8
                I have done the at home IV four times. Used the PIC line and IV ball method. My wife would attach the ball to the PIC line 30 minutes later I was done. Home Health came once a week to change the dressing covering the PIC line when I had completed the course of IV Home Health came and pulled the PIC line out in less than a minute.

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