Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sleep apnea

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sleep apnea

    I have just failed a sleep test that was performed at home with a pulse- ox. Are upper level thoracic injuries prone to sleep apnea? What would be the cause of this? My injury is at T2 and I have had moments where I’m falling asleep and feel like I have to remember to take a breath. I also have a tendency to hold my breath if I’m In pain trying to change sleeping positions... worried about reflux at night as well. I’m not sure if these could be causes of sleep apnea. Anyone have any sleep apnea linked to
    an upper level injury? I’m so scared there is something else going on here but then sci causing sleep apnea is pretty scary

  • #2
    Yes, people with both cervical and thoracic SCI/D are at higher risk for sleep apnea than the general public. Most often it is OSA (obstructive sleep apnea) instead of CSA (central sleep apnea). We don't know why. Being overweight can contribute to risk, as can anatomical issues such as a short neck.

    Here is a good journal article about this: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4017769/

    It is good that you have been diagnosed, and while it is not fun to have to wear a CPAP or BiPAP at night, treating it appropriately will reduce strain on your heart and actually give you a more restful sleep. Finding the right mask or nasal pillows that is right for you can be a challenge. You don't mention what your insurance is, but Medicare does pay for the equipment and supplies, as do most other insurers.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you... the article is very helpful. I have my husbands insurance and I also have Medicare... so getting the equipment will be easier than wearing it but I’ll give it my best.

      Comment


      • #4
        I had sleep apnea prior to SCI - KLD is right on finding a good fit of mask and nasal pillows. Once you get used to it you will be grateful to have it. Uninterrupted sleep IS all it's cracked up to be ! Good luck

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, I have it myself, and have now used CPAP every night for 3 years. It does take some getting used to, but I found my best mask right away with the help of my sleep clinic, and that is the same one I use now.

          I wake up fully rested, and even have had better dreams. I attribute the latter to having more REM sleep (this is when you dream the most). It takes a hour or more to get into REM sleep; if you awaken during the time, the clock re-sets. REM sleep is also when your body produces most of it's HGH (human growth hormone) which in adults is responsible for healing and repair throughout your body. So REM sleep is critical if you are fighting off infections and healing wounds.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


          • #6
            I probably already know the answer but here goes... I think I have sleep apnea, 42 years t-2. I was scheduled for a test a few summers ago but had to cancel. Both of my brothers a few years older have sleep apnea.

            My Question: I take 10mg Diazepam and 10 mg of Baclofen before bed for spasms and the only time I take during the day... does that increase chances of sleep apnea?

            Comment


            • #7
              I was diagnosed with sleep apnea about 8 years ago, a year after my C7 SCI injury. I have very little body fat and was judged to have central apnea rather than the more common obstructive apnea. Tests showed that I was having more than 100 apneas per hour. I started on a CPAP machine, using that for a couple of years before upgrading to a BIPAP machine. After a couple more years without the apneas being controlled very well, I upgraded to an Resmed ASV machine. It works quite a bit better for me. I average less than two apneas per hour, according to the Resmed monitoring software.

              I went through a whole range of full face masks trying to find one that didn't leak and didn't cause open pressure sores on the bridge of my nose. I finally found the Philips Respironics Amara View mask. It's great, especially when used in conjunction with the RemZzzs fabric liner--rarely leaks and never any skin breakdown. If you do try out those RemZzzs liners, ignore the manufacturers recommendation to use a new one ($1 each) every day. They can be used several days and then washed and used again and again.

              People worry about being able to sleep with the mask on. I can only speak for myself, but when I put it on it's like that gives my mind a signal that it's time to go to sleep. I have no trouble going to sleep or staying asleep. Conversely, if I try to take a nap in the afternoon without it, the apneas don't let me sleep well at all.

              I have never had true acid reflux, but I did learn that if I set the ASV pressure too high, it will force air into my stomach. I would wake up with extreme discomfort until I could belch out a whole bunch of air.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, unfortunately drugs that are sedating can increase your risks for sleep apnea. Please follow through with getting tested through a sleep lab.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                  Yes, unfortunately drugs that are sedating can increase your risks for sleep apnea. Please follow through with getting tested through a sleep lab.

                  (KLD)
                  Thank you. I will get working on getting a test scheduled.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I suspect I may have sleep apnea as well. There are times where I begin to fall asleep, and suddenly find myself gasping for air as if I forgot to breath. It's frightening when it happens. I otherwise sleep very poorly, and even worse so when I'm in a different environment. So I don't know how I could ever participate in a sleep study, because I doubt I would sleep.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by landrover View Post
                      I suspect I may have sleep apnea as well. There are times where I begin to fall asleep, and suddenly find myself gasping for air as if I forgot to breath. It's frightening when it happens. I otherwise sleep very poorly, and even worse so when I'm in a different environment. So I don't know how I could ever participate in a sleep study, because I doubt I would sleep.
                      Do you often feel sleepy during the day? Wake up with a headache? These can be signs of sleep apnea as well.

                      I also had doubts about being able to sleep with the monitoring equipment. I went to a lab where you were wired up from head to toe and it did take me a while to fall asleep, but they actually stopped the study after 3 hours because when I was sleeping I had breathing cessations as often as every 5 minutes. My lab also required me to come back and do another study (with a little less wiring up) wearing the CPAP to be sure that it worked for me; they also stopped that test early because I dropped down to less than 2 cessations an hour.

                      Some only do oxymetry monitoring with a recording oxymeter (device attached to a finger or earlobe) in your own home. Not as definitive as in a controlled sleep lab environment, but as above, can be diagnostic. Talk to your provider about how they recommend you be tested and which labs they work with.

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have sleep apnea and use a mouthpiece for it. I still don't stay asleep and rarely wake up feeling rested. Taking baclofen at night helps me to sleep better and wake up feeling rested.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by August West View Post
                          I have sleep apnea and use a mouthpiece for it. I still don't stay asleep and rarely wake up feeling rested. Taking baclofen at night helps me to sleep better and wake up feeling rested.
                          Have you been tested with the mouthpiece to be sure that it is actually correcting your sleep apnea?

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It was a long time ago. But if I recall correctly, there two studies in which I slept overnight at their office and they monitored the results. I suppose the second study must have been to test results with the mouthpiece.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sounds to me like it is not working correctly. I would recommend calling your sleep clinic and see if they want to re-test you with the mouthpiece.

                              (KLD)
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X