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Stage 2 sacral question

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  • Stage 2 sacral question

    Found it today. Just above the butt crack small crack on a red area. Arranging to see wound doc tomorrow through my GP via text (he?s a friend). GP thinks I?m ok to sit since it doesn?t touch anything as it?s where the seat cushion/back gap is located.

    SCI-Nurse, is that right?

    I get significant pain on my side and if my chair tilt in space is a legit way to relieve pressure for a sacral sore that could be useful.
    T3 complete since Sept 2015.

  • #2
    As long as you don't slump and area is well above the pressure areas and make sure no pressure or minimal is on the area.
    Drink water and high protein.CWO
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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    • #3
      Thanks CWO.
      T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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      • #4
        I’m seeing ads on Amazon for gel based, anti-ulcer pads for placement under the lower back and buttocks. Do there’s actually work? I have a hard time with side sleeping beyond 10-15 degrees owing to neuromuscular pain around my fusion site. After this one heals I’m looking for ways to minimize pressure for the intervals I’m on my back. I was working at home the last two weeks while on iv antibiotics and I’m sure it’s that extra bed time (as opposed to power chair with tilt in space) that got me my first sacral sore. The product I’m referring to is called PURAP bed sore prevention system.
        T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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        • #5
          I have not been impressed by studies using barriers or pads like this to prevent sacral or coccyx pressure ulcers. All the studies I know of are done in AB people in the ICU, and their blood flow is better than in those with SCI in their denervated areas.

          Most sacral and coccyx ulcers come from laying on too hard of a surface in bed; although they can occur in those who sacral sit in their wheelchairs as well. If you have problems in this area, it is best to minimize the time you lay on your back in bed (supine), get a better pressure reducing surface for your bed, and spend more time on your sides or prone.

          Be careful sitting with a coccyx wound, even with the area bridged, as tissue stretch across this area can interfere with wound healing too.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          • #6
            By the time I got to the wound doc at around 3 yesterday, the sacral stage 2 had closed (a bit more than 24 hours after finding it) and the area of redness on the butt cheek has shrunk a fair bit. The doctor had seen the photos from the day prior and was pleased.

            He put me on just aquafor to reduce any friction/abrasion and said I could work between a tilt-in-space position and standing. I'm still sleeping only on my side for now.

            I've had this bed since I switched from the rental hospital bed. It's a sleep number and I haven't had any issues before. I was, however, working in bed over the last few weeks owing to so much nerve pain, etc. from the resistant UTI and the IV antibiotics. I think that the increased time sitting with the head of the bed raised is the culprit.
            T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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            • #7
              Consider a body cushion system which allows one to sleep face down for periods of hours, depending on how much your face swells! haha. Also, not so easy to get onto.

              https://www.massagetools.com/the-bod...81f77b7f26f025

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              • #8
                I have a prone pillow from just google them mine is blue from Chattanooga but I saw them from 50.00 to 125 just ur preference

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                • #9
                  I just put a pillow under my torso or get my wife to bring out the massage table when I want to prone. Biggest issue is my nose clogs up in that position (might be my cat allergy).

                  Has anyone used that bizarre, but functional looking side-sleep pillow where your arm goes inside? That would help with side sleep. After a night of alternating side sleep, my fusion site just aches for hours.
                  T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mize View Post

                    I've had this bed since I switched from the rental hospital bed. It's a sleep number and I haven't had any issues before. I was, however, working in bed over the last few weeks owing to so much nerve pain, etc. from the resistant UTI and the IV antibiotics. I think that the increased time sitting with the head of the bed raised is the culprit.
                    Sitting up in bed with your head higher than 30 degrees significantly increases both sacral pressure and shear.

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                      Sitting up in bed with your head higher than 30 degrees significantly increases both sacral pressure and shear.

                      (KLD)
                      Is there any way to mitigate this? I guess the best way to watch TV is in my power chair tilted back. In bed is nice, but not worth an ulcer.
                      T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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                      • #12
                        Can you be on your side with the HOB elevated? Otherwise, this is really a position to be avoided for long periods of time.

                        (KLD)
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                        • #13
                          Yeah. Once these stage 1 are gone I can do a tilt of about fifteen degrees with the wedges I got during in patient.
                          T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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