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    Anyone go to Chiropractor .... what are your thoughts?

    Thinking of trying a Chiropractor....
    seeing if it helps with any of my pain.

    Anyone try it ?
    Thoughts?

    #2
    Originally posted by NW-Will View Post
    Thinking of trying a Chiropractor....
    seeing if it helps with any of my pain.

    Anyone try it ?
    Thoughts?
    Here is a paragraph out of a study reported in the Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1864800/Treatments for Chronic Pain in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury: A Survey Study

    "Alternative and Other Pain Treatments. Eighty-five (73%) of the respondents with pain reported that they had tried at least one of the 7 alternative pain treatments listed on the survey. Different alternative treatments had been tried by different numbers of respondent (Table 3); in descending order, these frequencies were massage (tried by 55%), marijuana (32%), acupuncture (28%), chiropractic manipulations (27%), biofeedback/relaxation training (23%), magnets (17%), and hypnosis (9%). The most relief was provided by massage (mean, 6.05 ? 2.47) and marijuana (mean, 6.62 ? 2.54), although chiropractic care was also among the treatments that provided greatest pain relief (mean, 5.00 ? 3.04). As with the other treatments, the relief provided by these treatments tended to last for minutes or, more often, hours. However, pain relief from massage and acupuncture lasted for days for a subgroup of about 25% of those who received these treatments. In patients who received chiropractic care, pain relief lasted for days in 41% and for weeks in 19%. Similarly, of those who received hypnotic treatment, the pain relief only lasted for days (33%) or weeks (17%), but the amount of relief provided by hypnotic treatment tended to be low (mean, 2.43 ? 3.16)."

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      #3
      I would not allow any forceful manipulation techniques on any part of the spinal column that has been fused. I would also not allow any forceful manipulation technique to be used on any portion of the spinal column that does not have complete sensation and proprioception. Ditto for any portion of the spine that does not have full bony density, which is unlikely in SCI, though sitting does help preserve density as opposed to the lower extremities. Any side lying manipulation technique could result in fracture of the lower extremity and hip as well.

      Soft-tissue techniques as well as non-force mobilization in areas that are above the level of injury may possibly be considered.

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        #4
        I've been going once or twice a week for twenty years to the same chiro and masseuse. Back then the docs wanted to do surgery on both shoulders, wrists and carpals. We wanted to see if 6 months would make a difference. It had so kept on going. The shoulders are shot after 46 years of draggin' my sorry ass thru life but feel without a doubt, the chiro and massage has kept me from the surgeries and still be able to live my very active lifestyle. Best thing I've ever done was delay those surgeries they wanted to do at the same time.

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          #5
          I've learned, to my intense regret and dismay, never to allow anyone to manipulate my spine in any manner whatsoever, not even with supposedly soft tissue techniques. I have been permanently damaged by well meaning, well trained therapists and specialists who imagined they understood the condition and tolerances of my spine and cord. Plenty of people will disagree with me, based on better personal outcomes than I've experienced, but I think it's entirely too risky to entrust a compromised spine and cord to therapists using any form of hands-on manipulation. I lost the use of my left arm and hand following one session of passive manipulation and massage by a Ph.D. physical therapist who pushed my cervical structures beyond capacity.
          MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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            #6
            I'll refer you to this Forum posting written by a former chiropractor. I contributed the Reader Response dated 8/3/13.
            stephen@bike-on.com

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
              I'll refer you to this Forum posting written by a former chiropractor. I contributed the Reader Response dated 8/3/13.
              Wow. Thanks for sharing that, stephen212.
              MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

              Comment


                #8
                I think it depends on the school they went to. This one sounded like the med. school on the Falklands Island war; You get the degree but not the proper training. I searched mine out extensively. I don't see him as often mainly due to his not open the days I'm in town. I still see my masseuse twice a week. Being a stuntman from long ago, is where I learned the value of a chiropractor being adjusted on set. These were top notch chiros. with a few others knowing from experience how to throw a rib or.. back in place. If you can't do the gig, they find someone else.

                I agree not to go to any medical practitioner without knowing their background.

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                  #9
                  It's all about finding the right chiro.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
                    I agree not to go to any medical practitioner without knowing their background.
                    How do you vet their background? Not trying to be pejorative...but what does "knowing their background" mean? How do we evaluate background vis a vie our own issues and needs?

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by gjnl View Post
                      How do you vet their background? Not trying to be pejorative...but what does "knowing their background" mean? How do we evaluate background vis a vie our own issues and needs?
                      That's just it, to me. I've been to physicians and therapists with great backgrounds (on paper), years of experience, and professional recommendations - and they still managed to screw up royally. With something as important as the spine and cord, I won't take chances anymore in the anguished hope that something might help with existing issues that are easier to cope with than bad therapeutic results.
                      MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
                        That's just it, to me. I've been to physicians and therapists with great backgrounds (on paper), years of experience, and professional recommendations - and they still managed to screw up royally. With something as important as the spine and cord, I won't take chances anymore in the anguished hope that something might help with existing issues that are easier to cope with than bad therapeutic results.
                        It is one of the most difficult issues that any patient deals with...no matter what the medical issues. One person's great doc is another person's worst nightmare...

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by gjnl View Post
                          It is one of the most difficult issues that any patient deals with...no matter what the medical issues. One person's great doc is another person's worst nightmare...
                          So true, GJ! Absolutely.
                          MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by gjnl View Post
                            How do you vet their background? Not trying to be pejorative...but what does "knowing their background" mean? How do we evaluate background vis a vie our own issues and needs?
                            Fairly easy now a days, I would assume, with the advent of the internet. It's not that difficult to find what schools and Universities they went too. If from the Falklands school of Chiropractory vs. the Palmer School of Chiropractors would be a good hint of their background and training.

                            Do you ever read the certificates of training your doc went thru? They're usually posted on his wall or can ask.

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                              #15
                              I used a chiro for several months about 25 years ago for a neck injury after tipping backwards in my chair. Did wonders for me, however I refused to have any manipulation below my neck. Moving forward and into 2000, I developed severe, debilitating bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and basically lost hand use for over a year (I'm T11). Saw a chiro to avoid surgery and within less than 5 months, he had cleared it up doing hand & wrist traction & manipulation along with some neck adjusting. Mine was brought on mostly from doing data entry for 20 years. Even though I had a very knowledgeable chiro each instance I still would avoid it if at all possible and never ever let them get anywhere near my fusion. As Bonnette mentioned, it doesn't take much to screw you up for life.

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