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    I this a stage 1 pressure sore

    see picture
    gp says it's a stage 1, i've never had a stage 1 like this.
    1. gp says wash and use lotion 3 times daily.
    2. internet article states keep the area clean and dry.

    so 1 or 2?
    btw i do my bm on my left side, my right side just doesn't get any pressure on it.
    so i don't get it. this sore popped up in one day.
    Attached Files
    Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
    Bob Seger

    #2
    Sorry to see that. I have no advice but would prefer an infectious disease person's opinion over my GP. It looks awful.

    Comment


      #3
      The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)https://www.npuap.org/national-pressure-ulcer-advisory-panel-npuap-announces-a-change-in-terminology-from-pressure-ulcer-to-pressure-injury-and-updates-the-stages-of-pressure-injury/

      "Deep Tissue Pressure Injury: Persistent non-blanchable deep red, maroon or purple discoloration
      Intact or non-intact skin with localized area of persistent non-blanchable deep red, maroon, purple discoloration or epidermal separation revealing a dark wound bed or blood filled blister. Pain and temperature change often precede skin color changes. Discoloration may appear differently in darkly pigmented skin. This injury results from intense and/or prolonged pressure and shear forces at the bone-muscle interface. The wound may evolve rapidly to reveal the actual extent of tissue injury, or may resolve without tissue loss. If necrotic tissue, subcutaneous tissue, granulation tissue, fascia, muscle or other underlying structures are visible, this indicates a full thickness pressure injury (Unstageable, Stage 3 or Stage 4). Do not use DTPI to describe vascular, traumatic, neuropathic, or dermatologic conditions."


      Suggest getting to a wound care clinic immediately.

      Comment


        #4
        Doesn't look like a pressure injury to me. Does it feel hot? Are you running a temperature? Did he do any lab work (like a WBC)? It looks much more like a burn, or even cellulitus. By definition, a pressure injury is over a weight-bearing bony prominence. That would not be the case for a problem like this which covers your abdomen, and does not look at all like pressure injuries that can occur over the ribs (rarely). Is the area larger/redder today? If so, I would get to an emergency room and ask to be evaluated for cellulitis.

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
          Doesn't look like a pressure injury to me. Does it feel hot? Are you running a temperature? Did he do any lab work (like a WBC)? It looks much more like a burn, or even cellulitus. By definition, a pressure injury is over a weight-bearing bony prominence. That would not be the case for a problem like this which covers your abdomen, and does not look at all like pressure injuries that can occur over the ribs (rarely). Is the area larger/redder today? If so, I would get to an emergency room and ask to be evaluated for cellulitis.

          (KLD)
          On second look, it does appear that you can see involvement of his thigh and that would indicate it is spreading, supporting your speculation of cellulitis. As I understand cellulitis, it is most usually caused by streptococcus or staphylococcus bacteria, entering through a crack or break in the skin. Most commonly cellulitis occurs in areas of the body that suffer edema, like the legs, although it surely can occur wherever there is some kind of skin break down and bacteria.

          "Tvot," have you fallen out of bed or your chair recently or lost your balance and injured your skin by falling over the arm of your wheelchair?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
            Doesn't look like a pressure injury to me. Does it feel hot? Are you running a temperature? Did he do any lab work (like a WBC)? It looks much more like a burn, or even cellulitus. By definition, a pressure injury is over a weight-bearing bony prominence. That would not be the case for a problem like this which covers your abdomen, and does not look at all like pressure injuries that can occur over the ribs (rarely). Is the area larger/redder today? If so, I would get to an emergency room and ask to be evaluated for cellulitis.

            (KLD)
            I agree. I'm going to the ER tomorrow. The last time this happened it was on my back. It was from being 320mg aspirin. I was told to go back to 81mg, that was in July.
            Also what the hell is this. (picture) they said PS also. I keep calfs on pillows ! BTW no chills or temp. Just livid. This new new GP is history.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by tvot; 23 Mar 2019, 8:07 PM.
            Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
            Bob Seger

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by tvot View Post
              I agree. I'm going to the ER tomorrow. The last time this happened it was on my back. It was from being 320mg aspirin. I was told to go back to 81mg, that was in July.
              Also what the hell is this. (picture) they said PS also. I keep calfs on pillows ! BTW no chills or temp. Just livid. This new new GP is history.
              Who is "they" that said "Pressure Sore?" How was the issue in July treated? I don't see the spreading redness in the July picture.

              No fever, no chills...does the area on your right trunk side feel warm?
              Last edited by gjnl; 24 Mar 2019, 10:39 AM.

              Comment


                #8
                Is that arrow pointing to your ankle, or your heel (as labeled)? To me, it looks like it could be a venous ulcer, which can occur in edematous lower extremities which have insufficient venous outflow. It should be evaluated by a wound care specialist and possibly a vascular surgeon. It is not a pressure injury.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by gjnl View Post
                  Who is "they" that said "Pressure Sore?" How was the issue in July treated? I don't see the spreading redness in the July picture.
                  Last July my cardiologist put me on a dose of 320 bear aspirin. Within 2 weeks what you see in that picture is quite similar to what's on me side, only it was on my back. I was put back on 81mg with no problems.
                  One finally thought. My new gp of a year is history. The gp I had since 77 canned me cuz I hadn't seen him in 5 years. Well boohoo Dr. Becker.
                  Going to wound center tomorrow and I will lie that gp moron set up the appointment.
                  I was so much easier years ago. I seriously believe there's to many pot smokers messing up everything, why are these receptionist out to lunch.
                  I'm really tired.
                  Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
                  Bob Seger

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Looks like a burn to me. Hot water from your shower?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by tvot View Post
                      Last July my cardiologist put me on a dose of 320 bear aspirin. Within 2 weeks what you see in that picture is quite similar to what's on me side, only it was on my back. I was put back on 81mg with no problems.
                      One finally thought. My new gp of a year is history. The gp I had since 77 canned me cuz I hadn't seen him in 5 years. Well boohoo Dr. Becker.
                      Going to wound center tomorrow and I will lie that gp moron set up the appointment.
                      I was so much easier years ago. I seriously believe there's to many pot smokers messing up everything, why are these receptionist out to lunch.
                      I'm really tired.
                      I assume your dictation program substituted "bear" for "Bayer." So are you saying that you had the same skin issue on your back last summer, and it was assumed that it was caused by a sensitivity to aspirin? Were you given any medications or did the skin condition go away after you went back to a lower dose of aspirin? Are you currently taking any new drugs or large doses of NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), like Aleve, Advil, Motrin etc. Aspirin and NSAIDs can cause hives (urticaria) and morbilliform (rashes or eruptions of the skin that look like measles) from mild to severe. Just another guess as to what may be going on.

                      By the way, just announced by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association a couple weeks ago, low dose aspirin therapy is no longer recommended as a preventative for heart attacks for older, healthy adults who don't have a high risk or existing heart disease.

                      Keep us up to date on diagnosis and treatment from the wound clinic.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I wonder if the aspirin connection made in tvot's posts has to do with excessive thinning of the blood and easy bruising, with pooling of blood under the skin where he lies. I'm looking at the pattern of redness and it makes me wonder - but it's just a guess.
                        MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                          Is that arrow pointing to your ankle, or your heel (as labeled)? To me, it looks like it could be a venous ulcer, which can occur in edematous lower extremities which have insufficient venous outflow. It should be evaluated by a wound care specialist and possibly a vascular surgeon. It is not a pressure injury.

                          (KLD)
                          A+ for KLD. I'm going back Friday for an ultra sound on my leg veins. Going to dermatologist Wednesday for skin rash.
                          Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
                          Bob Seger

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by tvot View Post
                            A+ for KLD. I'm going back Friday for an ultra sound on my leg veins. Going to dermatologist Wednesday for skin rash.
                            Sounds good. Best of luck.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Dermatologist diagnoses today. Its nummular dermatitis
                              Men get nummular dermatitis more often than women get it. Men often have their first outbreak between 55 and 65 years of age. I'm 59. Happy Happy, Joy Joy.
                              Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
                              Bob Seger

                              Comment

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