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    Blood Work

    I have orders for some blood work. I have a port because I'm a very hard stick. The problem is non of the labs will touch my port. Any suggestions on how to get it done?

    #2
    Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
    I have orders for some blood work. I have a port because I'm a very hard stick. The problem is non of the labs will touch my port. Any suggestions on how to get it done?
    I had a VAP or VAD (Veinous Access Port/Device) in my chest when I was treated for non-Hodgkins lymphoma. None of the labs in my area would access the port for blood work because the workers at the major labs are not nurses, they are phlebotomists. These ports have to be accessed with a Huber needle, a flush of saline, blood drawn, a flush of heparin. These devices should be accessed once a month to every six weeks to perform a flush.

    Nurses in outpatient surgery centers would not access the port for endoscopies or cystoscopies either. Once a nurse in an outpatient hospital setting (for the placement of a supra pubic catheter), called an oncology nurse from the cancer treatment unit to access the port. Oncology nurses it seems have the special training to access these ports, while general practice nurses may not. Accessing these ports take special training and supplies.

    So, I think you are pretty much out of luck getting someone to access your port for a blood draw. If I had difficulty with being a "very hard stick," I would go to my oncologist, who has a unit of a major lab in his office and have the phlebotomist call one of the oncology nurses to do the access procedure. But, that is only because I am a patient of the oncology practice, and even so, I would probably have to pay for the services of the oncology nurse to do the draw.
    Last edited by gjnl; 8 Dec 2018, 11:31 AM.

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      #3
      Originally posted by gjnl View Post
      I had a VAP or VAD (Veinous Access Port/Device) in my chest when I was treated for non-Hodgkins lymphoma. None of the labs in my area would access the port for blood work because the workers at the major labs are not nurses, they are phlebotomists. These ports have to be accessed with a Huber needle, a flush of heparin, blood drawn, then another flush of heparin. These devices should be accessed once a month to perform a flush.

      Nurses in outpatient surgery centers would not access the port for endoscopies or cystoscopies either. Once a nurse in an outpatient hospital setting (for the placement of a supra pubic catheter), called an oncology nurse from the cancer treatment unit to access the port. Oncology nurses it seems have the special training to access these ports, while general practice nurses may not. Accessing these ports take special training and supplies.

      So, I think you are pretty much out of luck getting someone to access your port for a blood draw. If I had difficulty with being a "very hard stick," I would go to my oncologist, who has a unit of a major lab in his office and have the phlebotomist call one of the oncology nurses to do the access procedure. But, that is only because I am a patient of the oncology practice, and even so, I would probably have to pay for the services of the oncology nurse to do the draw.
      I'm going to talk to my ID doctor and see if they can do it. The ID doctor might have to rewrite the script so they can get paid.

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