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Problem removing catheter when doing CIC

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  • #16
    but, hydro caths has less chance of uti's i thought?? but yes the hydro caths will dry. tell him not to open vapro until he is ready to insert.
    Originally posted by hlh View Post
    Thanks for this info. Still waiting on a Vapro sample to try with the coude. He's not a fan of the enclosed kits in general, but I'll look into that.

    Got some interesting info from the expert at his catheter supply company. He said that hydrophilic catheters actually stay slick for a relatively short period of time, and it is not uncommon for the coating to be insufficient if you leave the catheter in for too long or for some long term users (over time). He suggested my Dad be much quicker with his caths (should be in the bladder less than 2-3 minutes), and to try the CURE Ultra catheters. CURE Ultra catheters are not hydrophilic, but are regular catheters that are pre-coated with a lubricant over the entire length. So you open the package and it is ready to insert right away (no packet to pop). It has an insertion sleeve, to keep it clean. And it is "ultra-low resistance" since lubricant tends to be more slippery than hydrophilic coatings.

    So my Dad is waiting for samples of the CURE Ultra catheters, is trying to cath more quickly, and will see his urologist next week to have a cystoscopy to see if there is any scarring etc.. in his urethra.
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    • #17
      Originally posted by fuentejps View Post
      but, hydro caths has less chance of uti's i thought?? but yes the hydro caths will dry. tell him not to open vapro until he is ready to insert.

      Yes, in theory the hydrophilic caths were supposed to be associated with fewer UTIs. Surprisingly,when my Dad had a bad year of UTIs 3 years ago he used hydrophilics, so actually went back to regular ones for a period. But there were a lot of variables contributing....

      Anyway, he got samples of the new CURE Ultra today, and they were a failure. They were convenient, but the coating of the lubricant was uneven and very thick.... They were actually harder to insert than the hydrophilics, and slow to remove and left him with pain. So he's going to go back to trying different hydrophilics, keep them in for as short as possible. Thanks for the rec on not opening them until just before use.

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      • #18
        When I first started cathing, I used the EZ Gripper by MTG. It's a totally enclosed catheter with some plastic grips to make it useable for those with little or no grip strength. It was prelubricated. I could insert it and fall back asleep for half the night and it was always easy to remove. When I started using straight caths with the lubricant packets, I tried the same thing but found that the catheter was hard to remove when left in for a couple of hours. Then when I switched to hydrophyllic catheters, I found that I only had a few minutes before it seemed to dry and stick. I don't know if an enclosed catheter would work for your Dad, but MTG sure seems to have the right lubricant for the job.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by endo_aftermath View Post
          When I first started cathing, I used the EZ Gripper by MTG. It's a totally enclosed catheter with some plastic grips to make it useable for those with little or no grip strength. It was prelubricated. I could insert it and fall back asleep for half the night and it was always easy to remove. When I started using straight caths with the lubricant packets, I tried the same thing but found that the catheter was hard to remove when left in for a couple of hours. Then when I switched to hydrophyllic catheters, I found that I only had a few minutes before it seemed to dry and stick. I don't know if an enclosed catheter would work for your Dad, but MTG sure seems to have the right lubricant for the job.
          Appreciate the rec. He hasn't used one of that brand for years. The enclosed kits are a little harder for him to manage, but we'll take a look.

          Tried the coloplast speedicath, and while they don't have an insertion sleeve, they went in and out great. So slippery that they were a little harder hold while inserting! He'll try a few more of these. There's also a ?new Coloplast product speedicath flex that has an insertion sleeve covering the entire catheter. He has some samples of those to try.

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          • #20
            I use a wet wipe to hold the speedicath cath during insertion to keep it from slipping through my fingers. I also have extreme difficulty removing it when keeping the catheter in for longer than usual. If I drink water with lemon it sends my bladder into spasms giving me the urge to pee every five minutes. So one time, I tried leaving the speedicath in for an hour. That was a big mistake. It felt like I had inserted it with super glue.

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