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    speeding up bowel transit time

    seems like everytime i get like totally cleared out like from my noSe to ass, i dont go again for a while. anyway to keep things moving. i have sensation so no BP.
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

    #2
    Allow enough time after eating for the stomach and bowels to digest and move along.
    I refuse to tip toe through life, only to arrive safely at death.

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      #3
      LOL i eat corn to see how long the time is i call them trackers

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        #4
        Keeping the stool formed and not hard ( like a milky way) semisoft, will make it easier to go through the intestines.
        Stool softeners, diet, probiotics, drinking water/liquids should be used first before laxatives. Dig stim , suppository or Enemeez to empty out colon if needed.
        CWO
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #5
          Do you still use psyllium husk? My bowels recently started slowing down and I started adding the husk to my daily diet. It has made a big difference.

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            #6
            I use a soluble fiber that you cannot taste and can go in anything, called benefiber, once per day.
            I use an insoluble fiber (psyllium), such as Citrucel/Metamucil, once per day.
            I use a half dose of a stool hydrater, such as MiraLAX, every other day.
            I take a stool softener, once per day.
            I drink plenty of water and try to eat a diet that provides adequate fiber.
            I do my bowel routine every other day.

            This seems to keep the train moving. I believe mouth to rectum transit time is about 24 to 48 hours. One needs to keep ingesting proper foods in order to keep G.I. motility in order to push bowel contents out the other end.

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              #7
              Include varied resistant starchs in your diet. Worked better than anything. It feeds the good bacteria in the gut.

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                #8
                While intake to exit time (transit time) is 24 - 48 hours, that is what is quoted for someone who does not have a spinal cord injury. Due to the nervous system issues associated with this injury, transit time can be longer. Anywhere from 48 - 72 hours .....

                ckf
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  #9
                  I've spent the last 20 odd years absolutely dreading my bowel morning because not only did it take a long time, it would also often end in very poor results.


                  Ever since I was in hospital I've had my bowel routine carried out whilst in bed in the morning. A couple of suppositories would be inserted a couple of hours before my carer came in. Hopefully, I would have started to move by then. Sometimes I will do everything without assistance, nine times out of 10 I would need assistance from my carer which could take anything up to 1 1/2 hours. In the last few years results have been poor most days with the odd day where I produce an enormous amount of faeces. However, after a recent simple change in my bowel routine I seem to have really cracked the problem and everything is now absolutely fantastic. I can now be out of bed showered, my bowels clear in just over an hour.


                  There's nothing scientific about what changes I made, I simply sit over the toilet and let gravity take control. Actually, this is my bowel routine every other day.



                  When my carer arrives in the morning she will get everything ready in the bathroom and then insert a couple of suppositories. She will then go and get my breakfast and give it to me whilst I am still in bed. This takes approximately 15-20 minutes. I then get into my shower chair and take a shower. After my shower I clean my teeth at the think and 9/10 my bowels will start to move at this time. I always put them incontinence unit underneath me to catch anything that starts to come out. However, it normally takes only a few minutes before my bowels start to work over the toilet and I suppose it can be between 20 minutes and half an hour before they are clear completely and I'm back on the bed to get dressed.


                  For the first time in God knows how many years I don't dread my bowel routine morning.

                  I should have added that I do take one sashay of laxido mixed in 200 mL of water every night. This seems to keep my movements at a good consistency so my bowel can expel them by itself. I did take some fibre gel a couple of weeks ago and my movements became really hard and that was one of the times my carer had to manually evacuate me. So I don't take fibre gel any more.
                  Tetraplegic & Spinal Injury Site

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                    #10
                    John, not sure exactly what you're after but if you mean how to keep things moving in between or soft, I use Walmart brand (because it's the same stuff) Restoralax. Just a teaspoon in a drink will do with big meals. It's tasteless. Unless you dump a bunch in a small amount of fluid, you'll never notice it. It doesn't make you go, it just keeps moisture in the stool.

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                      #11
                      Are you able to share resources or more detail on the least problematic options? On its way out, some recently ingested corn evinced a 48 hour transit time, but even that had a girth that threatened to clog the sewer plumbing. Could my fondness in recent years for probiotic and organic foods have led to a gut that can convert food to concrete before the chewing is barely done? Can diet be sufficiently altered to compensate for my ravenously efficient gut flora, or are my only options between pharmaceuticals and this quarry of a colon?

                      My disregard for big pharma has helped reduce my use of prescribed drugs to hardly any. Softer poop would make life less consistently miserable and sweaty, but the very thought of violating my long abused rectal sphincter even more frequently makes it clamp tightly shut in screaming phantom pain. The most natural advice so far has been to eat prunes and unrinsed quinoa (for the sapopin coating). I can't eat enough prunes apparently without emulating a pungent and persistent tuba and the sapopins have the same problems as drugs I think.

                      I'd love to have a sensible strategy for escalating efforts to soften the stool while minimizing reliance on pharmaceuticals, my obstinance on that last point is diminishing.

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                        #12
                        While the food you eat is certainly very important, are you drinking enough water? That too is an important component of your GI system. Also sitting up for your routine. And getting enough exercise (I realize that is challenging). Consistency in timing seems to hold a key also.

                        ckf
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                          #13
                          Linzess has helped my bowel motility problem.

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                            #14
                            I drink lots of water, probably two gallons a day on avg, exercise is a challenge, but does help. Some kind of sensible escalation plan from where I am to the point of myriad ameliorative inputs like some people described here would be useful to a lot of people.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by everhad View Post
                              I drink lots of water, probably two gallons a day on avg, exercise is a challenge, but does help. Some kind of sensible escalation plan from where I am to the point of myriad ameliorative inputs like some people described here would be useful to a lot of people.
                              Three gallons of water consumed in a day is crazy dangerous! You could be at great risk for hyponatremia which can be life threatening, resulting in coma and death. If you are consuming that much water every day, you need to have frequent blood tests to monitor your electrolyte balance. Take it from someone who has been of the edge on death with very low sodium and an electrolyte imbalance. So very dangerous.

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