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Cleaning Catheters

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  • Cleaning Catheters

    For those of you who clean catheters. What type of catheter do you use and how do you clean them when you re-use?

    I have always used the red rubber 14fr catheter. To clean I always boiled them and put them in jars to keep them clean.

    Does anyone reuse and clean hydrophilic coated catheters?

  • #2
    Hydrophilic (lubricious) catheters cannot be cleaned and reused.

    PVC/plastic or silicone catheters can be cleaned, but boiling is not the best method for doing this, nor is microwaving, as they can melt.

    This procedure is the research-based method recommended if you must reuse these types of catheters:

    1. Rinse in warm water, then clean the outside of the catheter with plain (not scented) soap and water, rubbing with your hands to get off all lubricant and mucous.
    2. Avoid using antiseptics (betadine, alcohol, hand sanitizer, vinegar, etc.) to clean or soak catheters.
    3. Rinse well in warm tap water (don't put in the sink, which is very dirty, hold in your hands and run water over each catheter).
    4. Shake the catheter well to get as much water off the catheter as possible.
    5. Lay the catheter on a clean, dry towel. Fold over a bit of towel to completely cover the catheter.
    6. Allow to dry 24 hours folded in the towel. You can fan-fold the towel to accommodate a day's worth of catheters.
    7. Store the folded towel where pets will not lay on it, but where it will get good air circulation.
    8. Remove from towel and either reuse, or put into new clean paper lunch bags to take with you when away from home for catheterizations.


    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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    • #3
      I use 1 coloplast speedicath Hydrophilic (lubricious) catheter a day, reusing it 4 times. I rinse with tap water after use and store it in the original packaging topped off with tap water.

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      • #4
        Reuse of hydrophilic catheters is not recommended. The lubricant coating can harbor bacteria, and cannot be cleaned to remove it.

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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        • #5
          Used to boil the red rubber 14fr catheters, now medicare covers 200 per month free, no more boiling.
          c6/7 incomplete 6/30/07

          whats that smell? its me, cause im the shit.


          если я сейчас умру то нахуй я родился

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          • #6
            I use a reusable catheter at home and at work - my medical insurance won't pay for single use catheters and I only use them when away from home / work where I don't always have access to warm / clean water. At the moment I have two Cliny brand catheters (from Graykon Scientific, Australia), which have served me well for about two years.
            After use I wash them (as described by SCI-Nurse above), dry them on a clean paper towel and replace in it's tube. Once a week I soak them for a few hours in a mild tap water / bleach solution.
            In the past three years I have had only one UTI, which was successfully cleared up with a single dose of Urizone.
            T4 complete since 30 April 2012

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            • #7
              I would encourage you to stop the bleach soaks. There is evidence that even if you rinse the catheters well after soaking in bleach, that residual remains on the catheter, and can cause problems such as urethritis. Good air drying is the most important part of this procedure.

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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