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    #16
    Sodium bicarbonate costs pennies. Potasium citrate costs hundreds of dollars so there must be some benefit?

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      #17
      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
      Stones can easily reoccur, in fact once you have had stones, it is very likely that you will have them again. Potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate and lots of fluids (at least 3 liters of water daily) are recommended for prevention of uric acid stones as well as calcium stones. Uric acid stones form less readily in alkaline urine.

      (KLD)
      Three liters of water a day can put some of us as risk for hyponatremia. Any one planning on embarking on the above recommendation needs to monitor their electrolyte balance with frequent blood tests. That said, the counsel of a nephrologist, in this instance, is a reasonable consideration.

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        #18
        Originally posted by CapnGimp View Post
        KLD posted this in 2004...
        https://www.carecure.net/forum/showt...atients-(2003)

        I have had stones removed a few times starting in 1999, the last was 2016 when I started using Duette dual balloon catheters to reduce clogging/blockage. I will post a picture that was taken in 2014 when I had a couple of big ones removed(described as tennis ball size added together), didn't get pics of any of the others. The 2016 trip was done with lasers and if I can find the paperwork sometime, I will get the size. For some reason, they always put me under in the hospital. I can't feel a thing and do not get AD, since one time in rehab. I have 'grit' built up on the end of my catheters every time I remove them. I change them about 2-3 times per month. Hydration makes a big difference in discharge rates of sediments, 'slime', etc. The closer to clear I keep my urine in the leg bag, the less often they show up. For the record, I do not eat any animal products and avoid sugars like the plague, unless it occurs naturally in the fruits I eat. When I was eating animal products and sugars, it was WAY worse, that is when I produced the 'tennis ball' sized ones.
        Side question... I read that your last stone was after using the Duette catheter. Like I first stated, I've never had a stone until now. I know it's most likely from just being a person with sci using a catheter. ...but I just started using a Duette catheter about 6 months ago. Do you think it contributed to yours?

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          #19
          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
          Potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate and lots of fluids (at least 3 liters of water daily) are recommended for prevention of uric acid stones as well as calcium stones. (KLD)
          Potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate -Are these tablets? Or powder? Do you mix it in water? Any suggested dosage?

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            #20
            Sodium bicarb is also known as alka seltzer, here in the states. It needs to be dissolved and then down the hatch. Cheap and does seem to work for some people.

            Once you have had a stone, you are more likely to form them again. A indwelling catheter of any sorts seems to put you at higher risk for forming them. However, I know plenty of people who have had them and have not had an indwelling.

            Diet has gone back and forth as a culprit, and there is some evidence that sugars in particular can contribute towards the formation. I am not convinced 100% since I know people on both sides (those who consume a lot and those who don't), both who form and don't form stones. It certainly does not hurt to limit your sugar intake.

            ckf
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              #21
              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
              Sodium bicarb is also known as alka seltzer, here in the states. It needs to be dissolved and then down the hatch. Cheap and does seem to work for some people.

              ckf
              Alka Seltzer contains three major ingredients: aspirin, sodium hydrogen carbonate and citric acid. If someone were going to try sodium bicarbonate to help prevent stones, wouldn't it be better to take it in the form of baking soda dissolved in water rather than taking aspirin which those taking coumadin (warfarin) should avoid and is know to cause some people stomach upset and gastric distress, even bleeding?

              The article cited at the end of this sentence suggests a common dosage for adults is 1-2 teaspoons of baking soda dissolved in water 3-4 times a day. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Recent Progress and Future Directions, See section entitled, Acidic Urinary pH (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1831527/)

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                #22
                Ye, it probably is. However, unless you are on Coumadin, the aspirin can also assist with resolving any pain that may occur with the formation of grit or a stone.

                ckf
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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