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Knee high spiral compression (vet) wrap for stage 2ish sore on bottom of heel

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    Knee high spiral compression (vet) wrap for stage 2ish sore on bottom of heel

    Anyone familiar with using a knee high spiral compression (vet) wrap for stage 2ish sore on bottom of heel with only one layer of foam pre-wrap and a thin duofoam pad (with medihoney and 2x2 gauze pad) for padding? Wouldn't that put more pressure on the nickle size sore? Don't you need an o cushion around the sore keeping pressure off the sore?

    Thanks!

    #2
    I'm not familiar with the compression wrap you mention, but as wiith any pressure wound, anywhere, at any stage there should be no pressure on the area at all.

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      #3
      http://www.o-wm.com/exclusives/notes...ssion-wrapping

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        #4
        What are you saying is stage 2 ish? What color is it? And the heel- doesn't take much depth to be a stage 4 and get osteomyelitis. Also what caused the pressure ulcer? Shoes? wheelchair?
        CWO
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #5
          Nickel size on very bottom of heel, white around the edges, red in the middle, and depth about the thickness of a dime. According to the pictures attached, it looks like number two. . Believe cause was wearing uncushioned shoe with hard foot bed and foot banging into wheelchair footrest during a transfer. No fever. Thanks for the response.
          Last edited by webfoot; 26 Jul 2017, 4:27 PM. Reason: photo didn' load

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            #6
            Nickel size on very bottom of heel, white around the edges, red in the middle, and depth about the thickness of a dime. According to the pictures attached, it looks like number two. . Believe cause was wearing uncushioned shoe with hard foot bed and foot banging into wheelchair footrest during a transfer. No fever. Thanks for the response.
            Last edited by webfoot; 26 Jul 2017, 4:26 PM.

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              #7
              webfoot, the compression bandages in the photo are usually used to control swelling of the feet and legs. From personal experience, they would do nothing to help a pressure area on the heel.

              When I had a pressure wound on my heel, the medical advice was to try and prevent any pressure on the area. It's almost impossible to do that unless you stay in bed all day, so try and find a way to keep your foot from resting on anything hard.

              When I sat in the wheelchair, I used a piece of foam with a hole cut out, and put that on my footplate. I then positioned my foot on it, so the heel was suspended over the hole. It did the trick and the wound eventually healed.

              Good luck.

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                #8
                I agree. Compression wraps like this are used to treat venous ulcers which usually occur on the ankle and calf in those with venous insufficiency. If your wound is actually a pressure injury as you say, and not a diabetic foot ulcer or venous ulcer (which look quite a bit different than a pressure injury), compression wraps are not an appropriate treatment. I think you need to get back to the wound care nurse who prescribed these, and discuss their rationale, and get a more appropriate treatment.

                Agree with keeping all pressure off that area, but avoid using foam donuts as above. A heel protection boot used most times in bed that can also be worn in your wheelchair would be best, and you would also be advised to not sit with your foot dependent for long periods of time, as edema can slow wound healing.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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