Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Catheter Insertion difficulty

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Catheter Insertion difficulty

    I intermittent cath and some days I have difficulty inserting my catheter and other days it goes fine using surgilube. On the bad days it seems like my urethra dries out so much and this causes the problem. Not sure what causes it to dry out so much where I cannot insert the catheter. It definitely helps when by bowels move and can get a little urine the urethra to help the insertion process. Thinking about skipping days taking my oxybutinin tablets to see if this might help get a little urine in the urethra. Anyone else ever have this issue?
    Last edited by Mike_Stan; 9 Mar 2017, 2:47 PM.

    #2
    About where in the insertion process are you having this problem? Right away or further up?

    I've tried Surgilube and don't like it as well as some other lubricants. I think Surgilube is too liquid. I like a lube that is thicker, something like Pro Advantage by NDC. Pro Advantage stays were you put it.

    Comment


      #3
      Have you tried hydrophilic catheters? They insert a lot easier than the regular straight tip catheters. If you want to try a sample pack of 12 for free. Here's the link to my website to try them out no cost for shipping nothing. https://www.indemedical.com/Cure-Hyd...ks_p_2994.html Good luck. Nick Mireles Indemedical.com

      Comment


        #4
        It's normally about 4 to 5 inches in. Today is the first time in 32 years I have not been able to get the catheter in. I have tried twice. I have tried a couple of different lubricants including Pro Advantage. Had many issues with it so I went back to Surgilube which works best for me. Never tried hydrophilic but will give them a try. Thanks for the website.

        Comment


          #5
          Do you sit in your chair when you go? I ask because I've had this problem, too and I sat in my chair to go. Now I transfer onto the toilet seat and that really alleviates the problem for me. Do you ever bring up a little blood after your failed attempt?
          Rollin' since '89. Complete C8

          Comment


            #6
            I've had this issue happen frequently. It may be stool pressing up against the prostrate or, an enlarging prostrate. The viscosity of the lubrication can also cause difficulty passing the cath. Another factor is the size and diameter of the cath.
            I refuse to tip toe through life, only to arrive safely at death.

            Comment


              #7
              Yes, I sit in my chair when cathing. I never had any blood. Today it seemed harder to insert catheter the first 4 inches but couldn't get any further than that. Finally did the bowel movement thing and got the urine in the urethra and was able to insert catheter. Not sure what I would have done if there wasn't stool to pass and get the urine in urethra. This has happened off and on different times but was the worse today.

              Comment


                #8
                I reduced the size of my cath and found it alot easier after that.. I'm now using FR 12 all the time and keep a couple of FR 10 as backups. Can usually get a few samples of the different sizes.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'm the opposite: when I had difficulty with insertion I found that increasing the Fr size from 14Fr to 15Fr helped, because the 15Fr was stiffer. But that was with red rubber type, which are floppier than the silicone kind most people use.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I had the same issue (bad) when changing my indwelling foley...before my urostomy. Doc said that my pain meds effect on the bladder sphincter may have been the cause...dunno if ur on pain meds or not. My utis were back to back to back so I got an ileal conduit urostomy...
                    C6/7 Complete

                    14 years post injury

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Mike_Stan View Post
                      I intermittent cath and some days I have difficulty inserting my catheter and other days it goes fine using surgilube. On the bad days it seems like my urethra dries out so much and this causes the problem. Not sure what causes it to dry out so much where I cannot insert the catheter. Anyone else ever have this issue?
                      I have been doing intermittent cathing for 39 years and have run in to this problem. A few precautionary things I do are scoot to front edge of seat partially to get out of any dump in chair because I find bladder doesn't drain fully if I am down in angle. (I also think cath has a straighter shot to bladder) At the same time if I am / was having any problems with insertion just tried to rotate each leg a bit to trigger any spasms and get things as loose as possible. Also a little relax breathing helped.

                      Finally, and in the past two years most relevant I have started putting lubed cath in and moving cath down and up gently before making it all the way to bladder. It seems to me that this technique lubricates the tract pretty well. I rarely have a problem since adopting this method.

                      I use a 14 fr cath, it is about 16" long so I insert lubed, go down about 4-5 ", pull back up ( but don't remove) gently push back down to about 9" second time and maybe third time, go all the way down to uretha assuming you are getting no resistance. For me, each time it seems to go down with less resistence. This has pretty much solved the problem, it takes about 20 seconds. The distances above are not exact but suggest you try sliding up / down a few times and seeing if it gets easier ( less resistence) each time.
                      Hope it makes a difference for you.
                      Last edited by ChesBay; 13 Mar 2017, 2:41 PM. Reason: typo

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Maybe bulbourethral gland secretion rather than urine that provides lube, but you can't rely on that every time.

                        Instillation of 10 mL of lubricant into urethra before catheter may help.

                        Was told not to use lidocaine lube for self-cath. Presumably, so that you don't hurt yourself.
                        Last edited by zagam; 15 Mar 2017, 11:34 PM. Reason: Can't type SI
                        http://zagam.net/

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I agree with the hydro caths. I use regular caths and surgilube at home, and once in a blue moon, I will have the same difficulty that you're having. Have never found a correlation to anything as a cause. If you search back, you will find quite a few threads where people have had it happen.

                          When I am out and about, I use Coloplast SureCath hydrophyllic bag caths for convenience. If I have the stuck cath problem at home, I will use the SureCaths for the next 2 or 3 caths, and waalaa, the problem will go away and normal caths work fine again.

                          No rhyme, no reason, just another sci gift...
                          "a T10, who'd Rather be ridin'; than rollin'"

                          Comment


                            #14
                            i have experienced the same problem few times in the past, and the solution i did was to use a hard intermittent catheter with tube size of a lesser diameter instead. For lubrication i use xylocaine jelly.

                            If nothing works for you, you would ultimately need to convert to supra pubic catheter.

                            In the mean time you can read my detailed post on intermittent catheterization male guide. I hope it helps you http://spinalinjury.info/intermitten...rization-male/
                            Quadriplegic c6 complete.

                            Bsc(HONS) Applied Physics / Msc Electronics from University of Karachi. Currently doing Mphil in AI/Robotics from IBA karachi.

                            Physics / Maths high school instructor. Part time Web developer/ blogger . Have keen interest in Astronomy / physics/ World politics / Economics.

                            Visit http://spinalinjury.info where people suffering from SCI share articles about post spinal cord injury life based on research and personal experiences

                            Comment


                              #15
                              One thing that you have in your guide, is to recycle the catheters. Fortunately, as of right now, we do not need to do that in the US. This is just a piece of information, not a critique.
                              ckf
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X