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Why does my back arch...normal?

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    Why does my back arch...normal?

    T6 complete, I have noticed that when I sit straight up, in my chair, or even being upright in my standing frame, that my back tends to arch so that if I put my hand behind me there is space between my spine and backrest down around the lower half of my back. The problem is my back only touches my backrest at the top edge of it because of the arch. I didn't even know it did this for years. Is this an issue with anyone else, and is it normal? Doctors and therapists have ever said anything, so I'm wondering if it's because some muscles aren't stretched like they should be, but I don't know which ones would cause my back to arch if they are tight. Anyone else's back do this?
    Last edited by Brad09; 23 Aug 2015, 4:26 PM.

    #2
    I believe what you are describing is lordosis. Unfortunately it tends to hit many with SCI because of the constant sitting. A PT may be able to help with exercises to strengthen muscles you do have and to look at your seating system. Stretching your back muscles too much just compromises your posture.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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      #3
      You should have a seating therapist look at your seating and make adjustments and also can give you assitance in preventing potential future problems or keep from worsening problems. The curvature of the lower back goes in a bit but normally you are able to straigten your spine. Lordosis is the exaggerated curvature. CWO
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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        #4
        Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
        You should have a seating therapist look at your seating and make adjustments and also can give you assitance in preventing potential future problems or keep from worsening problems. The curvature of the lower back goes in a bit but normally you are able to straigten your spine. Lordosis is the exaggerated curvature. CWO
        Well it's curved below my injury level. So I don't have the muscles to force my back to straighten. Are you saying it should be straight anyway? So if I were to sit against a flat wall, my back should be touching it all the way down?

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          #5
          I had my wife sit in my chair, on two different cushions, and her lower back doesn't touch the backrest either. I asked her to sit against a flat wall and it was the same. The only way she could get her lower back flat against the wall was to hunch forward, which you wouldn't/couldn't do in a normal seating position. So apparently this is normal. You should put your hand behind your lower back to see if there is any space between your lower back and backrest. Obviously this isn't an issue when reclined, only when sitting straight up, and my backrest is at 90 degrees.
          Last edited by Brad09; 24 Aug 2015, 8:56 PM.

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            #6
            also could be a spasm if it occurs everytime

            I also agree with SCI Nurse CWO above

            pbr
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              #7
              I am T6 too and have severe scoliosis so done some "mapping" which gives the therapist information about how we sit and that allows them to adjust cushion and back rest etc to try and help our back. Good luck

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                #8
                Thanks everyone, I've been to my local seating clinic last year after I got my cushion and had it pressure mapped and my therapist and I picked out my backrest specifically for my posture, so everything has been checked out. Like I said before, I think it ended up just being the natural curve of my lower spine, that we all have when sitting straight up 90 degrees. Because my wife has the same space between her lower back and the backrest when she tried it.

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                  #9
                  Yes Brad, everyone should have a bit of lumbar curve. Lordosis is when it goes past just sliding a hand flat back there. Some backs have an adjustable air pumped lumbar support area in them. For more than a small degree of the exaggerated curve you need more than that and need to see a seating specialist.
                  Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                  Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                  Comment

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