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Shoulder impingement...cortisone shot?

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    #16
    Injections do not repair the damage already done to your shoulder, and if numbing agents were included in your injection, they can actually make you more likely to continue activities that were damaging your shoulder already and even make the injury worse. Be careful.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #17
      Joe Monte posted this item on another thread:
      http:///forum/showthread.php?250063-...et+rich+plasma

      My doctor wanted me to try PRP plasma treatments and stop getting the quarterly cortizone injections. I recently submitted all the paperwork to go thru this process. I will let you know how it works after I get it. Here is some info. The clinic conducting this is the New Jersey sports medicine clinic.

      PLATLET RICH PLASMA (PRP)

      What is PRP?
      PRP is an acronym for Platelet Rich Plasma which is an emerging modality being used in the treatment of orthopedic, musculoskeletal, skin and dental conditions as well as sports injuries. This procedure is rapidly becoming "mainstream" with many professional and elite athletes having received the treatment. The process involves preparing an autologous (same donor and recipient- it’s yours) tissue graft of platelets from a patient’s own blood. The person being treated has some blood removed, which is spun in a centrifuge that separates the blood components eventually creating a solution of concentrated platelets.
      Depending on the indication, the solution may be injected into ligament, tendon, joint, or grafts (tissue or hardware) prior to being transplanted or implanted to aid in healing and improved structural integrity. PRP is being used with success to promote wound (ulcer) healing in diabetics and people with bad circulation. PRP is being used to coat titanium implants during lumbar spinal fusion and to aid healing from complicated fractures and post joint replacement procedures1. One study demonstrated treatment of patients with chronic elbow tendinosis with buffered platelet-rich plasma significantly reduced pain.
      How does this stuff work?
      Platelets are known to most as blood cells that help the blood clot. However this is only one of many roles that platelets play. In fact, by being the first cells on the scene of an injury they have a key role in initiating and coordinating the healing response. In ones body, receptors on the surface of platelets tell them to go to the sight of injury where they initiate clotting and interact with signaling factors released by injured tissue. Platelets can release a multitude of signaling proteins, growth factors, chemotactic factors which stimulate tissue repair and vascular remodeling. This returns the tissue to a normal structure to do its job and results in less or no pain.
      Through scientific research much is known of the armamentarium contained within a platelet. Through electron microscopy and biochemical studies it is known that platelets have many different granules or storage containers for different signaling proteins, structure proteins, coagulation factors and proteases. The surface of the platelet has a variety of membrane embedded protein which provide for a dynamic action in response to tissue damage. By receiving signals from the local environment platelets have the ability to release their healing factors in a control and appropriate fashion.

      I'm looking forward to hearing more about this.

      All the best,
      GJ

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        #18
        I am currently waiting for the doctor to reveiw all medical records and xrays/mri's. Once I hear more, I will post what's going on. I hope it does work and I can eliminate the quarterly shots in both shoulders.

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          #19
          Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
          Does it work for ED?
          You know if I answer this the way I want to they will kick my butt ou-ta-here. Personnally for that condition, I use a keno waitress that can suck the chrome off a trailer hitch (thanks Willy).

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
            To use the kinesiology tape, you need to see a PT or OT who knows the correct technique in applying it. They can teach you how to apply it correctly. It is difficult to tape your shoulder yourself, so you may need someone to help you with it.

            it may assist in reducing your pain and is certainly a good option to consider. That being said, the cortisone should also assist in reducing the inflammation significantly. Add the tape to that and you may not need as many injections.

            ckf
            I must disagree. I've been slapping this dam tape of every one that will let me for 3 years. And I don't know squat. This stuff is not a medical device. It has no proven medical value. (Except for one night at a holiday with a nurse) So why am I so wild about it. Cause I've slapped it on me and I'm better. I've slapped it on my girl and she's better, I've slapped it on my 92 year old mother and she doesn't go to the pain clinic for her knee or back anymore. I've slapped it on grumpy old farts (my friends) who, skydive, kayak, surf,etc and as much as they hate to admit it; its helped them all. Except that dick Cliff, but there's just no helpin" him, cause he's a pain in the @*$^.
            So give it a try.

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              #21
              I'm happy to say that the shot has significantly helped my shoulder pain. It's been about 2 1/2 weeks and while it still clicks a little bit, having very little pain. Now let's hope it stays this way! At least for a good 8-12 months.
              -------7-23-04----------
              C5/6- Workin' on Recovery
              www.darrentempleton.com
              www.pushtowalknj.org

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                #22
                That is great. Much like my experience with the injections. It is critical for you to remember that although the pain is diminished you have a very fragile joint. Treat it like you want it to last. If you have not done it yet, read the manual linked to the S.O,.S. below.
                You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                See my personal webpage @
                http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                Comment


                  #23
                  hmm..with all of the success...I wonder why mine did not help? Maybe I need to think about trying it again.
                  "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by wheeliecoach View Post
                    hmm..with all of the success...I wonder why mine did not help? Maybe I need to think about trying it again.
                    Sometimes the problem is misdiagnosed. But this is one of those procedures that is best done by very experienced physicians. Most physicians are "qualified" to do the injections but those like family practitioners only do them occasionally. Consequently, they may miss the targeted area. The likelihood of success is increased if the injection is done by physicians who have a sports medicine practice or orthopedic surgeons who specialize with shoulder problems.
                    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                    See my personal webpage @
                    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
                      Sometimes the problem is misdiagnosed. But this is one of those procedures that is best done by very experienced physicians. Most physicians are "qualified" to do the injections but those like family practitioners only do them occasionally. Consequently, they may miss the targeted area. The likelihood of success is increased if the injection is done by physicians who have a sports medicine practice or orthopedic surgeons who specialize with shoulder problems.
                      I actually had it done by my physiatrist (sp?). He has given me other shots for other things (tendonitis in my elbows mainly) and those worked wonders. This was the only one that did not. It was several years ago...so maybe I try once again.
                      "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Check out the article in latest New Mobility about non-surgical alternatives to shoulder issues. The individual's own blood is centrifuged to separate blood plasma and plasma is injected into tears to promote healing. It's called PRP therapy and sounds very impressive. Article is by Bob Vogel.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Thanks for the resource 55. I got a small taste of what it would be like without shoulder usage for the 2 days it was sore. That would be very bad if it got anything like that long term. I'll keep giving an update as time passes, and when/if I need another shot.
                          -------7-23-04----------
                          C5/6- Workin' on Recovery
                          www.darrentempleton.com
                          www.pushtowalknj.org

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by divin'darren View Post
                            Ok so I'm about 5 days past when I had the cortisone. It was quite sore for a few days. The next day I could barely transfer and could feel some soreness all the way up until yesterday. So now I can kind of feel if it has had any effects.

                            It still clicks and pops a little, I wasn't really expecting that to change right away or at all, but I think there is a bit of improvement. The easiest thing to tell is that I'd sometimes get pain while pressing downward while in bed on my stomach, to either roll over or change positions. I'm not really getting that pain right now. I've been a bit cautious but it does feel better. I'll give another update in a few days or a week.

                            Have you seen a PT or OT at all about this? I work closely with my PT, and we've done a lot to work on improving my shoulder mechanics. My lats are frequently tight, and they pull my scapulae down. Muscle energy techniques and specific strength training has helped me. I have a non-Union shoulder separation, and a poorly aligned elbow (both from my original injury), so some things just can't be helped. Having an expert look at your mechanics and make recommendations is a good idea (frequently orthopedic physicians and physiatrists are not experts in mechanics - but some are).

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Cortisone shot ok but you need to see Physical Therapist- and get exercises etc.. that might help it from worsening and may even get better. With neck/shoulder muscles weak you shoulders tend to hunch forward and down and cause the problem. CWO
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

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